Designing an Easy-to-Use Web Site

This page lists a checklist of the top accessibility design questions, links to design hints, and design questions that need answers. Can you help our team to answer these questions?

Checklist of the Top Ten Accessibility Design Questions

  1. Do your pages display in any browser? Yes or no?
  2. Do your pages display in less than 10 seconds? Yes or no?
  3. Is the information in an easy-to-read format for screen readers such as JAWS, Window-Eyes, or Window Bridge? Yes or no?
  4. Do your pages provide navigation links that show your users where they are and where they can jump to? Yes or no?
  5. Do your pages mainly use text and not more than three graphics? Yes or no?
  6. Do the graphics have a description in the alt tag? Yes or no?
  7. Does your site use simple headings, paragraphs, lists, and tables but not frames? Yes or no?
  8. Does your site comply with the W3C HTML 4.0 tags? Yes or no?
  9. Was the site tested using the popular screen readers such as JAWS, Window-Eyes, or Window Bridge? Yes or no?
  10. Was the site tested for accessibility by using the CAST Bobby Accessibility tool? Yes or no?

Additional Design Hints

Links to Design Hints

Can you help us answer the following design questions?

  1. How can we make the navigation links at the top and bottom of each page usable for a person who is totally blind? Can we make them talk and jump?

    Part of the answer from Tiger Team 3 - To navigate forward from link to link, use the Tab key. To navigate back from link to link, use the Shift+Tab key. To open a link while navigating, press the Enter key. This navigation method works for Netscape 4.03 or higher, Internet Explorer 4.01 or higher, or Opera 5.12 or higher.

  2. Is it easier for screen readers such as JAWS to read sentences or lists? For example, is the following list or sentence easier to read?

    This page lists links to organizations:

    - or -

    This page lists links to Canadian, American, and British organizations.

    Answer from Tiger Team 3 - Use a sentence. With automated speech, the sentence was more understandable than the list version. The list version was difficult to understand and had no natural rhythm so it almost sounded like it didnít end properly.

  3. How can we use the MS WAV program to play a talking description of the site?

    Answer from Tiger Team 2 - Refer to the Sound File Information and Research that was produced by the Humber College Tiger Team 2 during the Spring of 2002.

  4. How can we use the MS WAV program to play a talking description of the links?


Tiger Team 3 - Usability Research Results

Tiger Team 3 developed a usability checklist to evaluate the accessibility to a web site for a person who is blind. Then, the team used this checklist to evaluate the redesign of the PinBall Design (design.html) page.

Tiger Team 3 in the Humber College Quality course researched and published the Usability Checklist and Evaluation reports. Thanks to Rachel (team leader), Laura, Debbie, Lloyd, and Randall for taking the extra time to help other people to design a web page for people who are blind.