An occlusive dressing to suffocate the larvae causing it to migrate into the dressing is the preferred method of choice for removal.  This technique has many variations, but petroleum jelly may be the best option.  Care must be taken to  remove the entir Top left D. hominis larva in patient forearm (Medical Post 1996 Lower left an early 3rd instar larva of Dermatobia hominis.  Three slits in each of its two spiracles set in a cavity are visible Cuterebra spp. scatter eggs on foliage in areas traveled by small rodents such as rabbits, mice and squirrels.  When in contact with a warm blooded animal the egg hatches and enters the host through the skin (mucous membranes suggested) developing to 3rd Dermatobia hominis larva.  Rows of parallel concentric  spines angled posteriorly help anchor the larva in the skin Cuterebra emasculator adult fly with pupa  illustrating the typical characteristics  of  the Cuterebra spp. insect D. hominis attach eggs to other Diptera flies such as mosquitoes Dermatobia hominis adult fly, also known as the Human Bot Fly Cuterebra spp. larva.  Notice the smaller spines and the grub like shape compared to that of D. hominis The Cuterebra spp. larva on the lower right with two slits in each of its two spiracles is a 2nd instar larvae Top right anterior hooks common to both Dermatobia and Cuterebra spp. larvae Surgical removal of larvae may be required if it is located in a critical area or the larva is dead

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