HAMILTON & DISTRICT BUDGERIGAR SOCIETY INC.



INFLAMMATION of The Airsacs (AIRSACCULITIS):
Several species of bacteria, fungi (especially Aspergillus fumigatus) and some mites are capable of producing exudates which cause the walls of the airsacs to adhere to each other. In some instances, masses of cheesy, yellowish material are formed. Visceral gout may also produce whitish deposits on the walls of the airsacs, but this cannot be diagnosed during life. Obstruction of the airflow by adhesion of the opposed walls of the airsacs or by accumulation of exudates severely interferes with the mechanism of respiration. Although the bird may not appear to be very ill and may eat well and be lively, its breathing becomes heavy, its tail pumps noticeably up and down, it loses weight, and clicking sounds during breathing may be heard some distance away. After quite brief exercise, particularly flight, respiration becomes very distressed for a time and the heart rate greatly increased. Unless there is also a generalised infection present, the bird usually recovers within a few minutes. In the live bird the cause of airsacculitis is rarely ascertained. It is usually chronic, and respiratory trouble can exist for months or even years before causing death. If such an affected bird contracts pneumonia or an acute infection, it is of course serious and frequently fatal. Treatment seldom has any effect on chronic airsac disease.

E-Mail: berniehansen@sympatico.ca

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Hamilton & District Budgerigar Society Inc.