HAMILTON & DISTRICT BUDGERIGAR SOCIETY INC.



FALLOWS
Color Varieties/Color Production/Genetics & History

Color Varieties:
Fallow Yellow (Light Green): Mask: yellow, ornamented by six evenly spaced large round brown throat spots, the outer two being partially covered at the base by cheek patches.
Cheek patches: violet.
General body colour: back, rump, breast, flanks and underparts, yellowish green.
Markings: on cheeks, back of head, neck and wings, medium brown on a yellow ground.
Eyes: red or plum.
Tail: long feathers, bluish grey.
Fallow Dark Green: As above but with a light laurel green body colour.
Tail: long feathers, darker in proportion.
Fallow Olive Green: As above but with a light mustard olive green body colour.
Tail: long feathers, darker in proportion.
Fallow Grey Green: As above but with a dull mustard green body colour.
Cheek patches: grey to slate.
Tail: long feathers, darker in proportion.>BR> (It should be noted that there are light, medium and dark shades of Fallow Grey Green).
Fallow Skyblue: Mask: white, ornamented by six evenly spaced large round brown throat spots, the outer two being partially covered at base by cheek patches.
Cheek patches: violet.
General body colour: back, rump, breast, flanks and underparts, pale Skyblue.
Markings: on cheeks, back of head, neck and wings, medium brown on a white ground.
Eyes: red or plum.
Tail: long feathers, bluish grey.
Fallow Cobalt: As above but with a warm cobalt body colour.
Tail: long feathers, darker in proportion.
Fallow Mauve: As above, but with a pale mauve body colour of a pinkish tone.
Tail: long feathers, darker in proportion.
Fallow Violet: As above but with a pale violet body colour.
Tail: long feathers, darker in proportion.

Genetics:
The Fallow is actually a mutation of a Green/Blue Budgie that had dark brown wavy design on a golden yellow background. The rest of the bird was olive yellow, the eyes were dark red and the legs were pink. This description shows that their is only a small difference between Fallow and Cinnamon. The Fallows brown is darker than the Cinnamon. Fallows have one easily distinguishable feature, namely their dark red eyes. The red is darker than that of the Albino and Lutino. The hereditary factor for Fallow is recessive to the factors of normal Budgies. That means, you lose the features of the Fallow when you cross them with other colour variants. To describe the Fallow factor we can compare it with Albino and Lutino. With the latter, it is a case of an absent melanin factor, the one that produces pigment. The melanin factor is double, it consists of black and dark brown pigment. Switching to Fallows, in their case there is a color change in the melanin, where the black is apparently pushed aside by the brown. The recessive Fallow factor is not sex-linked.
The rules for inheritance follow:
Fallow x Fallow: produces all Fallow.
Fallow x split for Fallow: produces half Fallows, and half split for Fallow.
Fallow x Normal: produces all split Fallows.
Split for Fallow x split for Fallow: produces 25 percent Fallows, 25 percent Normal, and 50 percent split for Fallows.
Split for Fallow x Normal: produces half split Fallows, and half Normal Budgies.

Color Production:
Comparatively few people now breed the Fallow variety. They never enjoyed more than a passing popularity. At one time it was thought that the judicious use of Fallows improved colour in some of the Normals -- Cobalts, for instance -- but I think this was more theoretical than practical. With exceptions, they have never been as good as the old varieties in size and shape, and I am afraid that if one did improve colour by crossing them into Normals, that which was gained would be but poor compensation for a deterioration in type which would be likely to occur. Be this as it may, the suggestion that Fallows were useful to Normal breeders was not carried out by many fanciers, and nowadays it is rare for anyone even to refer to the theory. It is possible to breed a White Fallow and a Yellow Fallow (actually light green/yellow), but few specimens of either kind have ever been exhibited. Of those I remember the Whites were in no way better than Albinos, and the Yellows were inferior to Lutinos. The breeding of Fallows in their different colours should be conducted on similar lines to those recommended for the breeding of Normals, Greywings, etc.

History of Fallows:
The Fallow has never achieved any degree of popularity, and only occasionally are specimens seen in the Any Other Colour classes. As the Standard indicates, it is bred with all the Normal body colours. Then there is a light form of Fallow corresponding with the Greywing series, and there are Fallow Yellows and Fallow Whites. The markings are dark brown and the eye is red. The body colour is lighter than normal. The Fallow is not sex-linked. The Fallow was reported from California, USA in 1931. In December, 1932, Mr. Shrapel and Mr. Kurt Kokemuller purchased Fallows which had been bred by Mr. Schumann, of Magdeburg. Mr. Kokemuller described these birds in Der Wellensittich, Hanover, on 26th January, 1934, and this article was translated by Mr. F.S. Elliott and published in March, 1934. An interesting note on Fallow varieties appeared in The Budgerigar Bulletin of June, 1935. In the course of an article headed "The Material Foundations of the Various Colour Varieties of the Budgerigar and their Genetic Significance," Dr. H. Steiner, of Zurich, said:
"As regards Fallow Budgerigars, I should like to begin by giving an historical note. The yellow birds with brown undulation markings and dark red eyes, which were bred by Mr. Schumann, of Magdeburg, in 1932, do not appear to have been the first occurrence of this mutation. Before this, in the year 1929, a Swiss fancier, Mr. Augustin, of Biel, bred a brown Budgerigar which according to the description given to me must have been a Fallow. It came from a mating Olive X Greywing Green. Like Mr. Schumann's birds this was also a cock, i.e., the opposite of the genuine Cinnamon which appeared first as hens. It was exhibited at a bird show in Biel in 1929, and purchased by a well-known fancier, Mr. Zaugg, of Solothurn, who had to hand it over to the municipal aviary of Solothurn in 1930 for a short time to be looked after, and unfortunately, this bird died there in the summer of 1930 without leaving any progeny." Mr. Kokemuller expressed the opinion that the Fallow was not due, as in the case of the Albino, to the absence of one of the two pigment-forming factors (the agents for the formation of the black colour) but that it was only a question of an alteration of one of these factors, that it was a form of dilution, that is to say, of an equal reduction of the melanin, and that therefore it was better to describe it as the Fallow Budgerigar rather than Cinnamon. Fallows were first imported into Britain about 1933. It is recognised that there are two types of fallow, the German which had an eye iris and the British which has a solid red eye colour.

E-Mail: berniehansen@sympatico.ca

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Hamilton & District Budgerigar Society Inc.