It is a good thing for me my father, Errol, didn't always follow orders. As a crew member aboard the HMCS Magog in World War II, he missed curfew one night walking a young lady home and the next day was in trouble with the Captain as the ship patrolled the St. Lawrence River.

He had been summoned, reprimanded, and then was preparing to return to work when a German torpedo hit the ship -- right where he would have been had he not missed curfew.

He and most others survived, and I was born nine years later. But several died that day, and their loss is still commemorated by the Quebec town for which the ship was named.

Now I am a father myself, and my own father has passed on. This is dedicated to the men of the Magog and my son, Justin, who wishes he could have known his grandfather. I want to especially thank Herb Montgomery, another member of the crew, who has provided much all of the material you see here, and Mike Esraelian, son of Dick Esraelian, another member of the crew, who saw the site and offered additional photos.

I am also grateful to Jacques Boisvert of the town of Magog, both for keeping the memory alive and for contributing to this site.

Edison Stewart

 

The launch of HMCS Magog

The crew

Oct. 14, 1944: a first-hand account of the attack by U-1223.

Accounts from the Globe and Mail and Canadian Press

The Robertson collection: Photos of the aftermath

More from the Robertson collection

The Esraelian collection

The town of Magog remembers

The cenotaph in Magog

Another victim of U-1223, the SS Fort Thompson