GlassfordStatistics
The section provides data on NamesAges, Life Span, Marriage Age etc, and Family Sizes of Glassfords that are in my database. As information is forwarded to me I will make modifications to this data.

Glassford Most Common Names

The common names (first and middle) used by the Glassford family vary widely and depends upon the point in history you are looking at. In the early history of the family, generally a son or daughter was named after the father, mother or grandparents and often, should a child die in infancy the name was reused. As the number of children living past infancy increased, the names used became more extensive. This increased list often included the family name of a mother and it was often used as a middle name to carry on that family.

This section provides a summary, in chart form, of the common names that are related to the Glassford Family Tree. Female (350 name classifications from 1416 entries) and male (314 name classifications from 1575 entries) names are shown in separate charts. Each chart identifies the list of names in order based on the number of times it (or an alternate spelling) appears in the family tree. For each name, the date when it first could be found in the family is shown. The classifications were created using different spellings of the same name or common contractions of a name i.e. Larry for Lawrence, other endings such as Ann (e)(ebelle ) (ie) for Ann, Anne, Annabelle, Annie).

The family can be traced in an unbroken line back to James Glassford who was born in 1623 in Erskine Parish Scotland, in the tree, published in 1997, he was the first of the recorded 84 Glassfords to have the name James. In this 2011 edition, he is the first of 134. Other common male names (a comparison to the 1997 figures is shown as 2010/1997) include John (135/74), William (117/55), Robert (87/46), George (54/31), David (45/24), and Thomas (Tom) (40/21). The most common female Glassford offspring names of the James (1623) line include Mary (71/31), Margaret (73/30), Ann(e)(a)(ie) (73/28), Elizabeth (Eliza) (81/26), Janet(ice) (25/13), Jane (45/18), and Jean(ie) (36/13), and Agnes (25/10).

 

Male Common Names& Alternate Spelling

Quantity

% of Total

Year First Occurred

Female Common Name & Alternate Spellings

Quantity

% of Total

Year First Occurred

James, Jamie

139

8.7%

1623

Elizabeth, Eliza

81

5.7

1710

John, Johnston, Jonathan

135

8.4%

1670

Ann

73

5.1

1826

Wiliam, William

117

7.3%

1750

Margaret, Margartte, Margartta, Margret, Marggaret, Marget, Maggie

73

5.1

1690

Robert

87

5.4%

1655

Mary

71

5.0

1690

George

54

3.4%

1695

Jane, Janene

45

3.2

1746

David

45

2.8%

1825

Jean, Jeanie, Jeanine 36 2.5 1736

Thomas, Tom

40

2.5%

1775

Agnas, Agnes 25 1.8  

Don, Donald

26

1.6%

1831

Janet, Janice, Janette 25 1.8 1762

Henry

25

1.6%

1764

Sarah 25 1.8 1705

Douglas

24

1.5%

1905

Catherine, Cathryne 22 1.6 1755

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If you have any questions or concerns or wish to provide or obtain additional information please contact Gary Ernest Glassford mailto:gary.glassford@sympatico.ca
 


Glassford Age as a Factor in the Glassford Family Journey

Life Span

The average age expectancy of an adult Glassford varies depending upon the specific line that you investigate. To produce statistically valid results for any single line requires more information on the date of death than I currently have on record. However, using the data that is available, some analysis can be done. The current database contains death dates and birth dates (confirmed and estimated) for 844 individuals (this compares to only 90 in 1997 when the book was first produced) both male and female members of the Glassford family (spouses have not been included here). The entire database produces an average life expectancy of 57 years. The following chart identifies the various life expectations based on the time frame in which a person lived, provides a breakdown between men and women, and shows the impact of the removal of infant/youth mortality. There is insufficient information in the database to provide valid information for 1600-1699 or 1950-2010 so these time frames have been omitted.

 

The data shows there is a significant impact on life expectancy for those born in the 18th and 19th century due infant mortality. Without the infant data, the male life span increased by 4 to 9 years on the average and the female’s span changed from 3 to 13 years

 

Life Span Data of the Glassford Family

Time Frame

# M

# F

Avg. Age All

Adult only

All M

Adult M

All F

Adult F

1700-1749

19

12

32.0

53.3

31.1

54.5

34.0

51.0

1750-1799

41

33

54.5

61.1

64.9

73.1

47.0

60.4

1800-1849

68

65

58.2

61.3

57.0

61.0

58.0

61.8

1850-1899

121

104

57.2

58.5

53.8

60.2

61.2

63.7

1900-1949

119

94

58.4

61.2

51.4

54.5

69.4

71.5

 

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If you have any questions or concerns or wish to provide or obtain additional information please contact Gary Ernest Glassford gary.glassford@sympatico.ca
 


 

Marriage Age and Starting a Family

The age, at which a person will marry changes, based on the family, social pressures and expectations, the sane can be said for the birth of children, number of children and even the number of marriages. In 1997, data related to the specific marriage dates is missing from most of the older records, the records themselves were not available or difficult/expensive to access, however the last 13 years has allowed all three of these difficulties to be reduced considerably.

 

In the following table identifies: the average age of men and women when they were first married, had their first child and their last child. The information has been created using a database of 850 individuals with these events recorded. In order to limit the skewing of the information with regard to “social norms” the data has been broken down into seven (7) time frames between 1623 and 2000.

 

Some interesting analysis of the results show that over the years the average age for a man to be married for the first time is decreasing while women are marring older. These changes are sufficient to show an aging population for first marriages when men and women are combined. Although women are marring older those that are having families are having their first child closer to the marriage date and their last child at a younger age.

Average Age at Child Birth and Marriage

Time Frame

Age 1st Child M + F

M

F

Last Child M+F

Last Child M

Last Child F

Age 1st Marriage   M + F

1st Marriage M

1st Marriage F

1623-1699

26.5

27.4

22.5

35.5

34.5

22.5

18.0

29.2

17.3

1700-1749

24.6

29.1

19.4

32.0

35.2

24.9

24.6

27.1

21.8

1750-1799

27.4

32.2

21.2

41.3

28.9

30.1

22.6

26.9

21.2

1800-1849

29.5

32.3

24.8

41.2

30.9

32.9

24.4

28.6

20.9

1850-1899

26.7

27.8

25.2

36.6

26.6

29.4

26.9

27.4

26.3

1900-1949

24.4

24.0

24.8

32.6

24.0

32.3

22.6

22.4

22.9

1950-2000

24.8

25.9

23.8

28.6

25.5

26.3

23.4

24.5

22.4

 

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If you have any questions or concerns or wish to provide or obtain additional information please contact Gary Ernest Glassford gary.glassford@sympatico.ca
 


 

Family Size

The number of children per family (marriage or common-law) and the number of families/marriages per individual depends on the historical period being investigated, the family life style (wealth/income) and the sex of the individual. In this analysis, I have used data only for Glassford “surnamed” individuals, as it is the most complete file than the entire database. The resultant data allows the marriages and child producing relationships of 195 persons, 170 males and 70 females, covering 12 generations of the family from 1623 to 1985 to be assessed.

 

These individuals have had a total of 220 relationships with 3 relationships for a single individual being the most and an overall average of 1.1 marriages per individual. It should be noted that none of the females in the data had multiple families even if they had multiple relationships.

 

The relationships have also resulted in 735 children (412 sons and 323 daughters). The most children recorded for an individual is 15, all from the same spouse, and occurring in the middle of the 19th century. The average family size is 3.8 children.

 

The following three charts provide summary data related to children per relationship.

 

Children per Marriage

 

First Marriage

Second Marriage

Third Marriage

Sons / Marriage

1.9

1.5

1.0

Daughters / Marriage

1.5

1.4

1.0

Children / Marriage

3.4

2.9

2.0

 

 

Children & Marriages with Time frame Reference

Time frame

Individuals

Marriages

Children

Son Tot

Dau Tot

C / 1st

C / 2nd

C / 3rd

1600-1699

8

9

30

16

14

16

14

0

1700-1749

10

12

45

21

24

36

6

3

1750-1799

23

26

141

79

62

128

13

0

1800-1849

19

19

104

50

54

104

0

0

1850-1899

38

40

131

84

47

129

2

0

1900-1949

58

70

197

110

87

168

26

3

1950-1985

39

44

87

52

35

85

2

0

Totals

195

220

735

412

323

666

63

6

 

Summary of Children & Marriages with Time frame Reference

Time frame of Individual’s Birth

Marriages per Individual

Children per Individual

Sons Per Marriage

Daughters per Marriage

1600-1699

1.1

3.8

2

1.8

1700-1749

1.2

4.5

2.1

2.4

1750-1799

1.1

6.1

3.4

2.7

1800-1849

1

5.5

2.6

2.8

1850-1899

1.1

3.4

2.2

1.2

1900-1949

1.2

3.4

1.9

1.5

1950-1985

1.1

2.2

1.3

0.9

 

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If you have any questions or concerns or wish to provide or obtain additional information please contact Gary Ernest Glassford gary.glassford@sympatico.ca