January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
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26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
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The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
February 5 - 11
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 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1940s Glenn Miller received a gold record for Chattanooga Choo Choo, in 1942. The song was from the movie, It Happened in Sun Valley, and was most likely presented to him by his own record company, Bluebird Records. The R.I.A.A. would begin awarding official American gold records in 1958, followed by platinum and multi-platinum records in 1976, and diamond records in 1999. Chattanooga Choo Choo had spent 9 weeks at number 1 in 1941.
 1950s A 1955 radio poll by WNEW showed that the most popular artists at the time were Perry Como, The Crew Cuts, Patti Page and Ray Anthony. Five months later, Bill Haley and His Comets would usher in the rock and roll era, leaving many easy listening artists in the dust. In 1957, he landed on British soil this week for a series of concerts, becoming the first American star to tour the U.K. By this time, however, The Crew Cuts were just seeing their last hit make the charts.
 1950s Heartbreak Hotel was performed by Elvis Presley on U.S. television for the first time, in 1956. He also sang Blue Suede Shoes, backed by hosts, Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey. This was The King’s third consecutive Saturday night appearance on Stage Show, broadcast from New York. On the previous shows he rocked his way through Shake Rattle and Roll / Flip Flop and Fly, I Got a Woman, Tutti Frutti and Baby Let’s Play House. The following week he repeated Tutti Frutti and added I Was the One. Heartbreak Hotel had just been released, but the single would take another two months to hit number 1.
 1960s Mark Dinning had his one-hit wonder, Teen Angel, make it to number 1 in the U.S. for the first of 2 weeks in 1960. The song had been written for him by his sister Jean, who was one of The Dinning Sisters. Some stations banned the song, and in the U.K. where it barely made the top 40, they dismissed it, stating that “blood runs in the grooves.” Teen Angel was one of many songs that were chosen for the American Graffiti soundtrack in 1973.
 1960s The Beatles made their famous, first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show. February 9th, 1964 was probably the most important date in rock and roll history. Over 73 million people (60% of the viewing audience) watched The Fab Four perform All My Loving, Till There Was You, She Loves You, I Saw Her Standing There and I Want to Hold Your Hand. It has been said that there were no crimes committed in the U.S. while the broadcast was taking place. The Beatles were paid $10000 for three shows (this one and a couple others). Two days later they played a U.S. concert in Washington, on a bill with Tommy Roe, The Chiffons and The Caravelles. A taped appearance from Liverpool aired on The Jack Paar Show on January 3rd, and was actually their first U.S. television showing. A year later, George Harrison was getting a tonsillectomy in London’s, University College Hospital. And in 1982, he handed over $9 million in proceeds from the Bangla Desh concert held on August 1st, 1971, after all the red tape had finally been cut.
 1960s The Monkees had their second album, More of The Monkees, jump from position 122 to number 1 this week in 1967. They were a group put together to star in a TV series in 1965, to capitalize on the recent emergence of The Beatles. The hit album contained a couple of great pop songs in I’m a Believer and (I’m Not Your) Steppin’ Stone. Expert backing was contributed by Glen Campbell and Neil Sedaka, while Carole King, Carole Bayer Sager, Tommy Boyce and others helped produce. Apparently the famous boys were still just providing vocals to their hits at this point in time.
 1960s Blind Faith formed in 1969, after the break-up of Cream and Traffic. Eric Clapton and Ginger Baker got together with Steve Winwood and Rick Grech. They recorded a self-titled album, using the 11 year old daughter of a friend of the cameraman’s for the cover photo, but went their separate ways before the end of the year. The trio named the band as a reaction to media expectations of the new supergroup. The album contained the popular tracks, Can’t Find My Way Home and Presence of the Lord, as well as the 15 minute, Do What You Like.
 1960s Tom Jones began a two year run in 1969 with his new variety show, This is Tom Jones. The television programme featured Jones duetting with guests each week, which brought in the high ratings. An album named after the TV show was released later in the year. It made the top 10 on the strength of cover songs like Fly Me to the Moon, Hey Jude, Little Green Apples and Let It Be Me.
 1970s Badfinger had their biggest hit when Day After Day made it to number 4 in the U.S. in 1972. Right behind it was a cover of their own song, Without You, performed by Harry Nilsson. Nilsson’s version would be the number 1 song in the U.S. 2 weeks later. Day After Day was their third and last top 10 song, as Baby Blue made number 14 later in the year. Both Badfinger songs were from their Straight Up album.
 1970s The O’Jays were awarded a gold record for Love Train in 1973. Released in 1972 on the Back Stabbers album, Love Train was a likely candidate for the first disco song. It followed the album’s title track into the top 10 in the U.S., eventually becoming the band’s only number 1 hit. Other standout tracks on the LP were Mr. Lucky and 992 Arguments, making Back Stabbers one of the best albums of Philly soul from the 1970s.
 1970s Paul Simon earned his only solo number 1 U.S. hit when 50 Ways to Leave Your Lover made it to the top for the first of 3 weeks in 1976. The song was from his landmark album, Still Crazy After All These Years. A return to work with Art Garfunkel was evident on the album in the form of My Little Town, a song that also appeared on Garfunkel’s Breakaway album.
 1970s Van Halen released their impressive debut album in 1978. Gene Simmons of Kiss met the band in 1976, but a demo tape he helped produce at the time went nowhere. A year later, Warner Brothers producer Ted Templeman got the group signed and took them into the studio to record the eleven track LP, including a cover of You Really Got Me. The album has since sold over 10 million copies.
 1980s Pink Floyd began the U.S. portion of The Wall tour in 1980 when they gave their first live performance of the new double album at the Sports Coliseum in Los Angeles. A 30 foot high wall was constructed across the 160 foot stage in the first half of the show, and then following the intermission, it was thoroughly destroyed. However, by this time in the life and times of Pink Floyd, Richard Wright was no longer an official member of the band. Instead he was paid a straight fee for his back-up on the tour.
 1980s Bill Haley died of a heart attack in 1981, at the age of 55. He was still a big star in Europe and south of the U.S. border, where his Twist album was the best selling album of all time in Mexico. It was reported that Haley was getting ready to release a new record of country and western music when he died in Harlingen, Texas. His last concert was in South Africa, in April of 1980, at which time he had been suffering from a brain tumour. Haley has sold over 60 million records.
 1980s Huey Lewis and The News were named the Best International Group at the fifth annual BRIT Awards in London, in 1986. They were in the middle of a run of hits that would continue into the early 1990s. The Power of Love from the Back to the Future soundtrack had given them their first number 1 in 1985, and was followed to the top a year later by Stuck With You, their biggest hit.
 1990s Billy Idol broke an arm and a leg in 1990 when he crashed his motorcycle. He apparently ran a stop sign and hit a car while in Los Angeles. The man with the Whiplash Smile was returning from the recording studio after session work on his next album, Charmed Life.
 1990s Del Shannon committed suicide in 1990, several days after appearing at the annual Buddy Holly memorial concert in Fargo, North Dakota. A self-inflicted gunshot wound ended his depression, which he had been fighting for years. Shannon had just finished recording a new album with the help of Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne. Rock On! was finally released a year later, and included the single, Walk Away.
 1990s Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers had their Greatest Hits album hit number 5 on the U.S. albums chart in 1994, where it peaked for 2 weeks. It included the newly recorded tracks, Something in the Air (originally a hit for Thunderclap Newman), and Mary Jane’s Last Dance. MCA Records would release Playback, a boxed set, after Petty left the label and signed with Warner Brothers, now part of AOL.
 1990s Carl Wilson and Falco both died this week in 1998. Falco had his best year in 1986 with Rock Me Amadeus at number 1 and Vienna Calling making it into the top 20. Wilson died of lung cancer, but also had brain cancer for over a year. He formed The Beach Boys with brothers Dennis and Brian, and cousin Mike Love, in 1961. Carl had the lead vocals on God Only Knows, as well as other hits including Good Vibrations.
 2000s The Isley Brothers had their Valentine’s Super Love Jam concert cut an hour short in 2000. While the group was entertaining the audience at the Los Angeles Sports Arena, police officers returned fire on a spectator seen shooting into the crowd, killing the suspect. Three other people were injured, and the concert was finally called to a halt. The Isley Brothers would see the release of another compilation of their early hits, Shake It Up, Baby, released by archive specialists Varèse Sarabande, a month later.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

February 5:
Barrett Strong (1941) and Al Kooper (Blood, Sweat & Tears, 1944) were born into Money.
February 6:
Fabian (1943), Bob Marley (1945), Natalie Cole (1950) and Axl Rose (1962) had their first Unforgettable experience.
February 7:
Sammy Johns wasn’t born in the back of a Chevy Van but it was on this day in 1946.
February 8:
The doctor realized that Some Things Don’t Come Easy when Larry Verne (1936), Dan Seals (England Dan & John Ford Coley, 1948) and Joshua Kadison (1965) were delivered.
February 9:
It was One Fine Day when Carole King (1942) and Barbara Lewis (1943) arrived.
February 10:
Roberta Flack (1939) and Nigel Olsson (Elton’s drummer, 1949) were measured for their first Dancin’ Shoes.
February 11:
There was a Lotta Lovin’ when Gene Vincent (1935), songwriter Gerry Goffin (1939), Bobby “Boris” Pickett (1940) and Sergio Mendes (1941) were born.
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

February 6:
Jesse Belvin died in 1960 in a car accident. Vince Guaraldi died of a heart attack in 1976. Hugo Montenegro died at the age of 55 in 1981. Falco died in a car accident in 1998. Carl Wilson died in 1998 of complications from lung and brain cancer.
February 7:
Dave Peverett (Foghat, Savoy Brown) died of pneumonia in 2000, at the age of 56.
February 8:
Del Shannon shot himself in 1990. Keith Knudsen, drummer for The Doobie Brothers, died of pneumonia in 2005. He was 56.
February 9:
Bill Haley died from what was assumed to be a heart attack in 1981. Brian Connolly (The Sweet) died of a heart attack in 1997. Tyrone Davis died after a stroke in 2005. He was 66.
February 11:
Oliver (William Oliver Swofford) died of cancer in 2000. He was 54.

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July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
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23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
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28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
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23 - 31

 
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