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The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
February 19 - 25
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 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s Buddy Holly recorded, That’ll Be the Day, at a New Mexico studio, in 1957. It was actually a re-recording because he had just switched labels. The title of the song was taken from a phrase in the John Wayne movie, The Searchers. This new version would soon become a rock and roll classic. Holly was backed on the track by Jerry Allison, Larry Welborn, Niki Sullivan, and Gary and Ramona Tollet.
 1950s Carl Perkins left Sun Records in 1958, becoming the first big rockabilly artist on the Columbia label. He had a number of singles released by Sun since joining the Sam Phillips team in 1955, but Perkins’ debut album, Dance Album of Carl Perkins, wasn’t released until just before he left. It contained most of his Sun singles.
 1950s Frankie Avalon had his first top 10 hit when Dede Dinah hit number 7 in 1958. He had a string of hits over the next couple of years, including Ginger Bread (number 9), Venus (number 1 for five weeks), Bobby Sox to Stockings (number 8), A Boy Without a Girl (number 10), Just Ask Your Heart (number 7) and Why (number 1 for a week).
 1950s Get a Job by The Silhouettes became a number 1, one hit wonder in 1958. The doo wop group took their name from the 1957 song by The Rays, and once Get a Job was played on American Bandstand (and Dick Clark was given half the publishing rights), the song became a national hit. Member Rick Lewis wrote the track on his mother’s piano, when things weren’t going very well with his career in the music business. She told him... well, what else? “Get a Job. You need to get a job. You get up in the morning and go out and get a job.”
 1960s The Beatles hit number 1 on the U.K. Disc singles chart in 1963 with their second single, Please Please Me. There are a couple versions of the song floating around. One of them has Paul and John singing different words.
 1960s Three classic British songs were released this week in 1964. Billy J. Kramer’s, Little Children, Just One Look by The Hollies and The Rolling Stones’ version of Not Fade Away all made the top 3 in the U.K. But it was Little Children that won the battle on both sides of the Atlantic. The song was the first and biggest U.S. hit by Kramer, and was followed later in the year by Bad to Me, I’ll Keep You Satisfied and From a Window. Do You Want to Know a Secret put him on the U.K. charts the previous year.
 1960s The Beatles began filming Help! in 1965. The original title of the movie was Eight Arms to Hold You.
 1960s Genesis released its first single back in 1968. The Silent Sun was written by Tony Banks and Peter Gabriel when they were trying to emulate The Bee Gees. The song turned up the following year on their first album, From Genesis to Revelation, but the flipside, That’s Me, didn’t until it was released on CD. Ten years later, Follow You Follow Me would become their first international hit single.
 1970s Simon and Garfunkel went out on top in 1970 when Bridge Over Troubled Water entered the U.K. albums chart at number 1 and stayed there for 12 consecutive weeks. It returned to the top seven times, spending a total of 41 weeks there over the next two years. It spent 10 weeks at number 1 in the U.S., on the strength of three top 10 singles taken from the album, and was the number 7 album of the 1970s in America.
 1970s 1975 was a big year for The Average White Band. This week they held the number 1 position on the albums and singles charts. AWB and its contained single, Pick Up the Pieces, were both huge hits for the Scottish group. Cut the Cake followed their instrumental hit into the top 10 a few months later. They were on a roll for the next couple of years.
 1970s Florence Ballard of The Supremes died in 1976 of heart attack, at the age of 32. She had left The Supremes nine years earlier after her constant fights with Diana Ross. Ballard was replaced by Cindy Birdsong, and by the time of her death, Ballard had separated from her husband and was on welfare, having lost a multi-million dollar lawsuit against Motown Records. Ross attended the funeral, surrounded by several bodyguards.
 1970s The vocals of Chris Thompson were heard on the number 1 song in the U.S. in 1977 this week. At the top of the singles chart was Blinded by the Light by Manfred Mann’s Earth Band, a rocking recording from The Roaring Silence album. Thompson would also soon be heard on a remix of Spirit in the Night, the follow-up single, and the 1984 hit, Runner, written by Ian Thomas of Painted Ladies fame. If You Remember Me and Hot Summer Nights gave Thompson a couple more hits in 1979 while he was a member of the band, Night.
 1970s Ray Charles was a guest on The Second Barry Manilow Special, in 1978. Charles performed One of These Days, a song to be included on his next album, Love and Peace, and joined the host on It’s a Miracle. Manilow was in the middle of a run of hits. Looks Like We Made It had been number 1, as was his Barry Manilow Live album, seven months before. Later in the year he would have four more hits, Can’t Smile Without You, Even Now, Copacabana and Ready to Take a Chance Again, from the Chevy Chase / Goldie Hawn film, Foul Play.
 1980s Bon Scott, of AC/DC, drank himself to death in 1980. Back in Black was released later that year, and in 1997, Bonfire, a box set, was put together in honour of Scott. Apparently, Scott had recommended Brian Johnson as his own replacement years before. Johnson was heard in the U.K. band, Geordie, before becoming a full-time AC/DC member for the Back in Black sessions.
 1980s Peter Cetera, bass player for Chicago, left the band in 1985 as You’re the Inspiration hit number 14 in the U.K. He was replaced by Jerry Scheff, as Cetera started a solo career. The following year he would hit number 1 twice, with Glory of Love from the movie, The Karate Kid Part II, and The Next Time I Fall, a duet with Amy Grant.
 1980s The Honeydrippers peaked at number 25 in the U.S. in 1985 with their second single, Rockin’ at Midnight. Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck and Nile Rodgers formed the one-off group for an EP of five songs. Sea of Love had already made the top 10 near the end of 1984.
 1980s Rolling Stone, Bill Wyman, organized a benefit concert in 1988 at the Royal Albert Hall to raise money for a local Sick Children’s Hospital. He was joined on stage by Ron Wood, Phil Collins, Elvis Costello, Ian Dury, Chris Rea, Eddy Grant, Terence Trent D’Arby and others. The Stones were in between the albums, Dirty Work, which featured the singles, Harlem Shuffle and One Hit (to the Body), and 1989’s very underrated Steel Wheels. It contained Rock and a Hard Place, a classic Rolling Stones track.
 1980s In 1989, just a couple of months after he died, Roy Orbison, had two of the top albums in the U.S. His solo album, Mystery Girl, contained the hit, You Got It, and Volume 1 from The Traveling Wilburys had success with Handle With Care and End of the Line.
 1990s Johnnie Ray died of liver failure in 1990. His recording of Cry dominated the charts for almost three months in 1951, and obviously benefited from the backing vocals of The Four Lads. Ray also had huge hits with Please Mr. Sun, Here Am I – Broken Hearted, Walkin’ My Baby Back Home, Somebody Stole My Gal, Just Walking in the Rain, You Don’t Owe Me a Thing and Yes Tonight, Josephine. That’s a pretty impressive achievement considering he was almost deaf.
 1990s The Byrds reunited in 1990 to play a few songs at the Roy Orbison All-Star Tribute Concert. Also appearing were Bruce Hornsby, Bonnie Raitt and B.B. King. Roger McGuinn, David Crosby and Chris Hillman sang He Was a Friend of Mine, Turn! Turn! Turn! and Mr. Tambourine Man. Helping out on one of the songs at the Universal Amphitheatre in California was Bob Dylan. A couple of months later, the three Byrds would record four songs for their upcoming Boxed Set, which also included the last two songs from the tribute concert. The recent recordings would finish off the fourth disc of the set, titled Final Approach.
 1990s Quincy Jones won a Grammy Award for Album of the Year in 1991. Back on the Block was chosen over 1990 albums by Phil Collins, Mariah Carey, M.C. Hammer and Wilson Phillips. Jones took home six awards at the end of the night, giving him a lifetime total of 25, five Grammys ahead of Henry Mancini, but still three behind Sir Georg Solti.
 1990s Billy Joel won an additional $675000 (plus interest), from his ongoing suit against former manager and brother-in-law, Frank Weber, in 1993. The Piano Man had already received $2000000, back in 1990. Joel would become a target himself when later in ’93, Gary Zimmerman filed a $10 million action against Joel, laying claim to River of Dreams, No Man’s Land and We Didn’t Start the Fire.
 1990s Sting made a guest appearance on Saturday Night Live in 1993, with Bill Murray as host. If Ever I Lose My Faith in You was peaking at number 14 in the U.K. that week. He was promoting the soon to be released, Ten Summoner’s Tales, which also would produce the singles, Seven Days, Fields of Gold, Shape of My Heart and Epilogue (Nothing ’Bout Me).
 1990s It was now Sir John Elton according to the introduction at a 1998 ceremony. Queen Elizabeth II was honouring Elton John with a knighthood when the mix-up occurred. It was soon straightened out as Elton’s mother and stepfather looked on at Buckingham Palace. The next day, a Grammy for Best Vocal Performance for Candle in the Wind 1997 would add Sir Elton’s long list of awards.
 2000s Don Henley appeared on VH1’s Live by Request show in 2000. He introduced songs from his upcoming album, Inside Job, including Workin’ It, Taking You Home, Goodbye to a River, Everything is Different Now and For My Wedding. Henley also served as host, fielding questions from the audience and generally taking control of the proceedings. Taking You Home was originally supposed to appear on the Double Jeopardy soundtrack, but was yanked, causing Henley to later sue for lost earnings.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

February 19:
All it took was One Heartbeat to announce the arrival of Smokey Robinson (1940), Lou Christie (1943), Falco (1957) and Seal (Sealhenry Samuel, 1963).
February 20:
Walter Becker (Steely Dan, 1950), Randy California (Spirit, 1951) and Kurt Cobain (Nirvana, 1967) became Showbiz Kids.
February 21:
Nina Simone (1933) and David Geffen (founder of Geffen Records, 1943) arrived Fine and Mellow.
February 22:
Ernie K-Doe (1936) and Oliver (1945) were met with the greeting, Good Morning Starshine.
February 23:
Johnny Winter (older brother of Edgar, 1944), Rusty Young (Poco, 1946), Steve Priest (The Sweet, 1950), Brad Whitford (Aerosmith, 1952) and Howard Jones (1955) felt Everlasting Love.
February 24:
Session keyboard player, Nicky Hopkins (1944) and Rupert Holmes (1947) made their Escape after 9 months of solitary confinement.
February 25:
Faron Young (1932) and George Harrison (1943) first experienced What is Life.
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

February 19:
Bon Scott (AC/DC) died from alcohol abuse in 1980.
February 21:
Famous disc jockey, Murray The K Kaufman, died of cancer in 1982 at the age of 60.
February 22:
Florence Ballard (The Supremes) died in 1976 of cardiac arrest.
February 23:
Howie Epstein died at the age of 47 of a drug overdose, in 2003. Bob Mayo died in 2004 from a heart attack. He was only 52.
February 24:
Arthur Lyman died in 2002 of throat cancer.
February 25:
Johnnie Ray died of liver failure in 1990. Edward Patten of The Pips died in 2005 from a stroke.

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