January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
Timeline


This siteThe web
Search
E-mail
 
The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
February 26 - March 3
Last Week   Next Week

 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s LaVern Baker wrote a letter in 1955 to the U.S. Congress with her concerns about the state of popular music. The current copyright act allowed (and still does allow), other acts to cover a previously recorded song using the same arrangement. Baker wasn’t pleased that white acts like Pat Boone and The Crew Cuts were having huge hits with their versions of R&B songs. She had a number of minor hits, but none were re-recorded by white artists. Five years later, Baker tried to reclaim Wheel of Fortune, a huge hit for Kay Starr that was borrowed from The Cardinals, and songwriters Claude Benjamin and David Weiss.
 1950s In 1955, sales of 45 rpm records finally outsold 78s. (Ask your parents if you’re confused by this.) The newer, smaller stereo singles invented by RCA Records would sell for over 35 years. They were 7 inches in diameter, but beginning in the 1980s, some 12 inch singles containing extended and rare versions of songs as B-sides would also play at 45 rpm.
 1950s Slim Whitman, U.K. record holder for the single staying at number 1 for the most consecutive weeks (until Bryan Adams’, (Everything I Do) I Do it For You), began his first British tour in 1956. Whitman was a country and western singer known for his yodelling, and never had a number 1 hit in the U.S., where he was born and raised. He was invited to Wembley stadium by Adams in 1991 after the longevity record was broken.
 1950s Chess Records released two important singles in 1957, with I Got My Mojo Working by Muddy Waters and School Day by Chuck Berry. Berry’s song would become his second top 10 hit, after Maybellene from 1955. (In between, Roll Over Beethoven wasn’t as successful, barely making the top 30 the previous year.) Waters’ recording didn’t even reach the top 100, but it did become a classic blues track, and was even the subject of a Mike Myers movie from 1999, based around the James Bond-like character, Austin Powers.
 1950s In 1958, Buddy Holly and The Crickets began their only U.K. tour. They played 25 dates, with two performances per night. The first show was at the Trocadero in London, and they finished up a little over 3 weeks later at the Gaumont Theatre. A couple of TV appearances were also made, one on the Sunday Night at the London Palladium variety show and the other on the Off the Record show with Jack Payne.
 1960s Notable number 1 hits on February 29th include Theme From A Summer Place (Percy Faith, 1960), I Want to Hold Your Hand (The Beatles, 1964), Love is Blue (Paul Mauriat, 1968), Without You (Nilsson, 1972), Crazy Little Thing Called Love (Queen, 1980), Jump (Van Halen, 1984) and To Be With You (Mr. Big, 1992).
 1960s Pony Time became Chubby Checker’s second number 1 hit. It was also his biggest, unless of course you consider that The Twist returned to number 1 a second time in 1962. Pony Time stayed at the top for 3 weeks in 1961 and is similar to Hank Ballard and The Midnighters’, Sexy Ways.
 1960s Betty Everett jumped onto the singles chart with The Shoop Shoop Song in 1964. It would eventually hit number 6, much higher than the version by Cher in 1990 for the movie, Mermaids. Everett would do a little better later in the year with Let It Be Me, a duet with Jerry Butler.
 1960s Jimmy Page released his only solo single before the Led Zeppelin days, in 1965. It was titled, She Just Satisfies, and may be found on the Session Man Volume 1 CD from 1989. Page was also busy back then doing session work for many other artists (including Brenda Lee), before joining The Yardbirds.
 1960s Buffalo Springfield was formed in 1966 by Stephen Stills, Neil Young, Richie Furay, Bruce Palmer and Dewey Martin. They split up in 1968, after releasing such greats as, For What It’s Worth, Burned, Mr. Soul, Broken Arrow and Kind Woman. Stills soon joined forces with David Crosby of The Byrds and Graham Nash of The Hollies. Neil Young recorded and toured with Crosby, Stills & Nash on several occasions, and also released many solo albums. Richie Furay met up with Jim Messina and Randy Meisner to create Poco in 1968. Martin later toured as Buffalo Springfield with several sidemen. Palmer dropped out of sight and played the sitar for ten years. He must have had sore fingers.
 1960s Engelbert Humperdinck’s, Release Me, was number 1 in the U.K. in 1967, preventing the double A-sided, Penny Lane / Strawberry Fields Forever from becoming The Beatles’ 12th top hit. It seems just as odd that in Q Magazine, U.K. fans voted the Penny Lane / Strawberry Fields Forever single number 2 of all time, behind Nirvana’s, Smells Like Teen Spirit. So if the single never made it to number 1, how could it beat out...
 1960s Frankie Lymon died in 1968. He overdosed at the age of 25 in his grandmother’s New York home, the day before a scheduled recording session for Roulette Records. Lymon was on leave from a Georgia army post at the time. Along with The Teenagers, he broke through in 1956 with Why Do Fools Fall in Love, while he was just 13.
 1960s The Association earned their last top 10 hit in the U.S. when Everything That Touches You made it in 1968. Another track from the Birthday album was the underrated, Time for Livin’, which would barely make the top 40 later in the year, and ended the group’s chart success in both the U.K. and America. Everything That Touches You was written by band member, Terry Kirkman, as was their first number 1, Cherish.
 1970s It was Slade’s, Cum On Feel the Noize in 1973, that was the first single to debut at number 1 in the U.K. after the split of The Beatles. Slade was a glam rock band that formed in the 1960s and went on to become a British phenomenon in the early seventies. They finally had success in the U.S. when Run Runaway made the top 20 in 1984, shortly after Quiet Riot took Cum On Feel the Noize into the American top 5.
 1970s Neil Diamond won the award for the Best Album of Original Score Written for a Motion Picture or TV Special with Jonathan Livingston Seagull at the 1974 Grammys. This honour is even more amazing considering that he was up against Bob Dylan for Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, and George Martin and Paul and Linda McCartney with the Live and Let Die soundtrack. Diamond’s album also won a Golden Globe award. In 1980, he released another motion picture soundtrack, The Jazz Singer, and although it didn’t win any awards, the album did go on to be his biggest seller with over 5 million copies in the U.S. alone.
 1970s Terry Jacks had the top song in the U.S. when his one-hit wonder earned him a pile of money in 1974, eventually selling over 11½ million copies world-wide. Jacks had left The Poppy Family in 1970, wanting to leave the pressures of recording and touring far behind. A couple years later, The Beach Boys asked for his help in a recording session and Jacks recommended that the group record a song by composer, Jacques Brel, titled Le Moribund (The Dying Man). It was a song that The Kingston Trio had issued as their last single for Capitol Records in 1964, from the Time to Think album. But even though The Beach Boys agreed to record the track, they decided not to release it. The English translation of the song was titled, Seasons in the Sun, and stayed at number 1 for three weeks, beginning on March 2nd, 1974. Jacks’ hit version is currently available on countless collections from the 1970s, including 1974 Seasons in the Sun.
 1970s The Eagles had their first number 1 hit in the U.S. (and first million seller) when Best of My Love went to the top in 1975. Previous hits had included Take It Easy (number 12), Witchy Woman (number 9), Peaceful Easy Feeling (number 22) and Already Gone (number 32). Many hits would soon follow, as The Eagles virtually owned the airwaves during the second half of the 1970s. Their earlier albums had more of a country feel to them because their record producer thought they would have more success with a mellower sound. But really, Glenn Frey, Don Henley and company just wanted to rock, and they won out by the time Hotel California was released in 1976.
 1980s In 1980 this week, police at Mason City headquarters discovered a file containing Buddy Holly’s glasses and a watch owned by The Big Bopper, that were found in the wreckage of their plane crash in 1959. Holly’s cuff links worn during the crash had already been presented to Paul McCartney back in 1976, when the first Buddy Holly Week was held. McCartney began organizing the annual celebration five years after he purchased the rights to Holly’s song publishing.
 1980s In 1981, The Tourists split up, resulting in members, Dave Stewart and Annie Lennox, creating The Eurythmics. Two and a half years later they hit number 1 with the single, Sweet Dreams, their only chart topper. 1989’s, We Too Are One, was arguably their best. It contained the song, Angel, which Lennox re-recorded for the Diana, Princess of Wales: Tribute Album.
 1980s In 1986, a full ten years after the incredible success of Frampton Comes Alive!, Peter Frampton’s latest single, Lying, peaked at a disappointing number 74 in the U.S. It was an excellent track from a strong album that unfairly earned very little attention. Other strong songs from Premonition include Stop, All Eyes On You and Call of the Wild. The good news was that Frampton’s best studio album was still to come. His self-titled effort in 1994 was amazing.
 1980s In 1987, The Beatles finally made it onto CD.
 1980s In 1988, Linda Ronstadt won her third Grammy. It was for Best Country Vocal by a Duo or Group for her contribution to the Trio album, with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris. The follow-up album by the three country divas was released in February 1999 and is titled, Trio II. It features a cover of Neil Young’s classic, After the Gold Rush, which both Ronstadt and Parton had previously recorded on solo albums.
 1990s James Brown was released on parole in 1991 after spending more than 2 years of a six year jail sentence. He had been found guilty of carrying a gun, persistent drug abuse and had led police on a car chase through two U.S. states before his imminent arrest. The Godfather of Soul announced a new album and tour upon his discharge, and stated, “I feel good.”
 1990s Neil Young and Steve Martin (!) backed Simon and Garfunkel at a 1993 benefit for the Los Angeles Children’s Health Project. Young sang background vocals and played electric guitar on The Sounds of Silence. He also performed a solo set. Martin had just appeared in the Leap of Faith movie, also starring Meat Loaf, while Young had just released his Harvest sequel, Harvest Moon.
 1990s Hootie & The Blowfish took home some hardware at the Grammys in 1996. The group from South Carolina won for Best New Artist and Best Pop Group Vocal Performance for Let Her Cry.
 1990s Dusty Springfield died in 1999 of breast cancer, after a five year battle that finally took its toll. Originally singing with The Springfields, Dusty was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame less than 2 weeks after she passed away at the age of 59. Hits like I Only Want to Be With You, Stay Awhile, Wishin’ and Hopin’, You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me and Son of a Preacher Man brought Springfield international attention in the 1960s. Her final album of original recordings was A Very Fine Love from 1995, on which she duets with Daryl Hall of Hall and Oates.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

February 26:
The Fat Man, Fats (Antoine) Domino (1928) was given a Whole Lotta Loving. On the same day, there was Time, Love and Tenderness for Johnny Cash (1932), Paul Cotton (Poco, 1943), Bob “The Bear” Hite (Canned Heat, 1945), Mitch Ryder (1945), Sandie Shaw (1947), Jim Crichton (Saga, 1953) and heavy metal artist, Michael Bolton (1954). (Just wanted to see if you were paying attention.)
February 27:
Guy Mitchell (1927) and Journeyman, Neal Schon (1954), were subjected to a lot of Lovin’, Touchin’, Squeezin’.
February 28:
Joe South (1940), Rolling Stone Brian Jones (1942) and Philip Gould (Level 42, 1957) began their Lessons in Love on this day.
February 29:
Everybody was saying, Gimme Jimmy, when Jimmy Dorsey arrived in 1904.
March 1:
Glenn Miller (1904) and Roger Daltrey (The Who, 1944) arrived on the Magic Bus.
March 2:
It seemed like Only Yesterday that Lou Reed (1942), Rory Gallagher (1948), Eddie Money (1949), Karen Carpenter (1950) and Jon Bon Jovi (1962) were born.
March 3:
Jennifer Warnes (1947) and Robyn Hitchcock (1953) were born at the Right Time of the Night.
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

February 28:
Frankie Lymon died of a drug overdose in 1968. Bobby Bloom died in an accidental shooting in 1974.
March 2:
Dusty Springfield died of breast cancer in 1999. Hank Ballard died in 2003 of throat cancer.

Last Week   Next Week
 
July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
7 - 13    14 - 20    21 - 27
28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 31

 
Timeline

Shop at
Alex's CD World
Alex’s CD World
January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
Timeline
July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
7 - 13    14 - 20    21 - 27
28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 31

 
Timeline