January
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February
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26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
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The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
March 4 - 10
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 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 A long time ago... In 1917, the first jazz record was issued in the U.S. when Nick LaRocca’s Original Dixieland Jazz Band released The Dixieland Jazz Band One-Step. LaRocca played the cornet in a group that was way ahead of its time. They fascinated audiences at home and in Europe, where their new variety of music became one of the earliest styles of jazz. By the time the early 1920s arrived, bigger and better jazz bands appeared, and LaRocca’s popularity faded.
 1950s The Banana Boat Song (Day-O) was released this week in 1957. The only problem was that two acts issued it simultaneously, choosing to fight it out in the charts. Harry Belafonté is best-known for the song, however, it was The Tarriers who had the biggest hit, reaching number 4, one position better than Belafonté. Many other artists also recorded the song and had success with it that year, including The Fontane Sisters, Steve Lawrence, Sarah Vaughan and Stan Freberg, all making the top 40 in the U.S. The Tarriers’ version may be found on the compilation, Troubadours of the Folk Era, Volume 3: The Groups.
 1960s Havin’ Fun by Dion peaked at number 42 in the U.S. in 1961. It was the follow-up single to the hit, Lonely Teenager, his first solo release after leaving behind The Belmonts. Two subsequent singles, Kissin’ Game and Somebody Nobody Wants would chart even lower for Dion DiMucci. At that point, he must have wondered if going solo was the right decision. But later in the year, the singing sensation would hit gold in a big way when Runaround Sue went to number 1, while the album of the same name made it to number 11. Meanwhile, The Belmonts had their excellent single, Tell Me Why, reach the top 20, but after Come On Little Angel the following year, their hits dried up. Dion and The Belmonts reformed in 1966 for the album, Together Again, but with little success. Thereafter, Dion remained a solo artist.
 1960s Patsy Cline died in 1963 when the Comanche aircraft in which she was a passenger, crashed after a Kansas City concert. Cline is best remembered for her smash hit, Crazy, written by Willie Nelson. Other hits included Walkin’ After Midnight, I Fall to Pieces and She’s Got You. Her Greatest Hits album was the best selling album by a female country artist, with over 8 million copies sold, until Shania Twain arrived on the scene.
 1960s Brian Wilson released the first solo record by one of The Beach Boys. In 1966, Caroline No made it into the top 40. It followed shortly after the number 3 hit, Sloop John B. A few months later, Wouldn’t It Be Nice would return the group to the top 10. All three songs were included on their masterpiece, Pet Sounds, released in May of the same year.
 1960s John Lennon stated in 1966 that The Beatles were, “more popular than Jesus now.” Lennon’s famous statement was hardly noticed by U.K. fans, but only when it was taken out of context and made into a U.S. headline did public outrage occur. Beatle records were burned in public fires and their music was banned from radio stations all over the world. Lennon later made a public apology, and regretted that his comment had been misunderstood. Only days before his remark, The Cavern Club had closed its doors. The Cavern was the bar where Brian Epstein first saw The Fabs perform in late 1961. It had outstanding debts and reopened later in the year. The club closed permanently in 1973 but was eventually rebuilt across the street.
 1960s The Fillmore East auditorium began its three year run in 1968 with performances by Big Brother and The Holding Company, Tim Buckley and Albert King. By the end of the year, acts like The Doors, The Who, The Troggs, Traffic, Blue Cheer, Iron Butterfly, Jefferson Airplane, Jimi Hendrix, Sly and The Family Stone, The Byrds, Steppenwolf, The Grateful Dead, Vanilla Fudge, Ten Years After, Blood, Sweat and Tears, Procol Harum, The Beach Boys and just about anybody else you can think of, had used the stage. Albert King returned in 1971 to close the club with The J. Geils Band and The Allman Brothers.
 1960s In 1969, the top 2 U.S. entries on the albums chart were The Beatles (The White Album) and Yellow Submarine. Paul McCartney got married to Linda Eastman the same week, 8 days before John and Yoko tied the knot. Exactly five years later, Lennon would get kicked out of a Smothers Brothers show, as a result of his heavy drinking. Lennon was having a hard time coping with the fact that Yoko had given him the boot. Yoko had also set him up with her temporary replacement, May Pang. Apparently Pang still has in her possession some recordings by Lennon. They are available on several bootlegs.
 1970s Charles Manson released an album in 1970, while he was in prison for murdering Sharon Tate. Manson said he received the message to kill from hints contained in the songs, Helter Skelter, Piggies, Revolution, Rocky Raccoon and Blackbird. He had previously convinced The Beach Boys to record his song, Never Learn Not to Love, which was released as a 1968 B-side to Bluebirds Over the Mountain, and also appeared on their 20/20 album from 1969.
 1970s Carole King, James Taylor and Carly Simon attended a political fund-raiser for George McGovern in 1972. Other attendees included Barbra Streisand, Quincy Jones, Mama Cass Elliot, Burt Lancaster, Jon Voight, Britt Ekland and Jack Nicholson. McGovern lost the election to Richard Nixon. James Taylor wrote about the end of the Nixon era on his Hourglass album, with the song, Line ’Em Up. “I remember Richard Nixon back in ’74, and the final scene at the White House door...”
Sitting On a Poor Man's Throne  1970s Copper Penny hit number 16 in Canada in 1973, with You’re Still the One. Theirs is easily the best recording around the idea, including similar hit songs by Orleans and Shania Twain.
 1970s David Bowie recorded his David Live album in 1974 this week, at the Tower Theatre in Philadelphia. The double album was released later in the year and included such well-known Bowie tracks as 1984, Rebel Rebel, Changes, Suffragette City, Diamond Dogs, The Jean Genie, Rock ‘n’ Roll Suicide and the Mott the Hoople hit, All the Young Dudes. The 1990 CD version from Rykodisc added bonus tracks, Here Today Gone Tomorrow and Time.
 1970s The Rolling Stones recorded Love You Live at the El Mocambo in Toronto, Canada, in 1977. They seem to like Toronto when it comes to playing live, as they have held rehearsals in the area for several of their tours. Local fans have also been treated to impromptu gigs at a small club or two while the band tested newer material.
 1970s The Bee Gees were in between number 1 hits in America when brother Andy’s, (Love Is) Thicker Than Water, made it to the top in 1978 for the first of two weeks. Along with Stayin’ Alive (number 2), Emotion (by Samantha Sang, number 4) and Night Fever (number 5), the brothers Gibb claimed writing and production credits on 4 of the top 5. (They also had the number 10 song with How Deep is Your Love.) Peaking third from the top was Sometimes When We Touch from Canadian, Dan Hill. Andy was having his second of 3 consecutive number 1 hits, and later in the year would keep Shadow Dancing at the top in the U.S. for an amazing 7 weeks.
 1980s Blues Brother, John Belushi (Joliet Jake Blues), died of a drug overdose in 1982. The very entertaining debut album, A Briefcase Full of Blues, went to number 1 in 1979, while the soundtrack from the movie, The Blues Brothers, hit number 13 the next year. John Goodman joined original Brother, Elwood Blues (Dan Aykroyd) in the movie, Blues Brothers 2000, which gave us another soundtrack album of enjoyable material.
 1980s Richard Manuel of The Band committed suicide in 1986 by hanging himself. Robbie Robertson remembered Manuel in the track, Fallen Angel in 1987. It was included on Robertson’s excellent debut solo album. Other standout tracks were Somewhere Down the Crazy River, Showdown at Big Sky, American Roulette, Broken Arrow and Hell’s Half Acre.
 1980s Whitney Houston’s debut album hit number 1 in 1986, almost a full year after its release. The Greatest Love of All single was also on the way to the top, following How Will I Know, Saving All My Love for You (also number 1 hits), and her first solo single, You Give Good Love. Houston’s mother, Cissy, was also in the music business, having recorded the original version of Midnight Train to Georgia before Gladys Knight and The Pips turned it into gold. Another family member, Dionne Warwick (Whitney’s cousin), was nearing the end of her run of hits with That’s What Friends Are For, which would soon be followed in 1987 by Love Power. In 1984, Hold Me, a duet Whitney recorded with Teddy Pendergrass shortly after the car accident that left him paralyzed, had stalled at number 46. But ever since her first album spent 14 weeks at the top of the albums chart, Whitney has kept the hits coming.
 1980s In 1987, the U.K. singles chart was crowded with re-issues, when a full 25% of the songs were either not the original versions or were re-releases of older tracks. Ben E. King’s, Stand By Me held the top spot while Percy Sledge’s, When a Man Loves a Woman was right behind at number 2. Both soul standards gained renewed popularity as a result of their recent use in commercials, and held their ground on the charts for three solid weeks. In addition, Stand By Me was featured in a 1986 movie of the same name.
 1980s Andy Gibb died from heart problems in 1988. The hits had dried up in 1981, after which he had a spell as host of the Solid Gold TV show. More recently, Gibb may be heard on the 1998 live Bee Gees release, One Night Only. He sings his hit, (Our Love) Don’t Throw It All Away with the Brothers Gibb. Shortly before his death, and just after he declared bankruptcy, the youngest Gibb brother had signed a new record deal and was working on a forthcoming album in the U.K. for Island Records. It was never finished.
 1990s Rolling Stone Magazine named Jefferson Airplane as recipient of the Most Unwanted Comeback of the year, during their Critics Awards for the twelve months leading up to March 1990. The group had released a 1989 self-titled album, which featured all of the main members from their glory days. Also presented with awards that year were U2’s, Bono, for Best Songwriter, Robert Palmer in the Best Dressed Male Rock Performer category and Neil Young for the Best Album, Freedom. Not much has been heard from Jefferson Airplane / Starship since this embarrassing award.
 1990s Chris Isaak won five Bammies in 1996 at the annual Bay Area Music Awards, held at the Warfield Theatre in San Francisco. Two of the trophies included recognition as Outstanding Male Vocalist and Musician of the Year for his work on the Forever Blue album, which was certified platinum a week later. Isaak is known for his haunting, Roy Orbison-like vocals and melodies, as well as his more upbeat rockabilly style. Wicked Game has been his biggest hit so far, reaching the top 10 in the U.S. a full year and a half after its release, due to the inclusion of the track in the 1990 film, Wild at Heart, starring Nicolas Cage and Laura Dern.
 1990s Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers played the first of seven sold out dates at The Fillmore in San Francisco in 1999. It was a return to playing live after a two year break. Performances from The Fillmore gigs were filmed and released later in the year on the home video, High Grass Dogs: Live from The Fillmore. The 90 minutes of footage includes renditions of songs from throughout Petty’s career.
 2000s Eric Clapton was inducted into The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000. It was his third time, after receiving previous honours as a member of The Yardbirds and Cream. This time his solo career was acknowledged. At the ceremonies held in New York, Clapton was joined on stage by Robbie Robertson when performing Further On Up the Road. Also gaining entry into the Rock Hall that evening were James Taylor, Bonnie Raitt, The Lovin’ Spoonful, Earth, Wind and Fire, Nat King Cole, The Moonglows and Billie Holiday.
 2000s Led Zeppelin officially became the most bootlegged band in 2001, when 422 illegal albums were tallied. Not surprisingly, The Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan and The Beatles were next in line, each with over 350 titles available in the U.K. With a rise in home CD copying, the amount of bootlegging has skyrocketed over the last five years, causing record companies to look into ways of copy protecting CDs.
 2000s A 24 year old fan came out of a coma at a Bryan Adams concert in 2003. Christiane Kittel went into a coma in 1997 and almost six years later, her mother took her to the concert in Regensburg, Germany, in a wheelchair. Adams had been the girl’s favourite artist, and his performance was credited for the awakening.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

March 4:
Chris Squire (Yes, 1948), and Chris Rea (1951) felt the Rhythm of Love.
March 5:
Eddy Grant (1948) and Andy Gibb (1958) experienced an Everlasting Love for the first time.
March 6:
Pink Floyd’s, David Gilmour (1944), Mary Wilson (The Supremes, 1944) and Kiki Dee (1947) provided some Baby Love.
March 7:
Chris White (The Zombies, 1943), Matthew Fisher (Procol Harum, 1946) and Peter Wolf (1946) were told to “Come As You Are” when they arrived.
March 8:
Mickey Dolenz (The Monkees, 1945), Randy Meisner (Poco / Eagles, 1946) and Gary Numan (1958) were delivered in the Heart of the Night.
March 9:
Lloyd Price (1933), Mark Lindsay (Paul Revere & The Raiders, 1942), Robin Trower (Procol Harum, 1945), Jeffrey Osborne (1948) and Chris Thompson (Manfred Mann’s Earth Band, 1948) each became a Runner in the human race.
March 10:
Dean Torrence (Jan & Dean, 1940) Tom Scholz (Boston, 1947) arrived after a Long Time.
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

March 4:
Glenn Hughes (The Village People) died of lung cancer in 2001 at the age of 50.
March 5:
Patsy Cline died in a plane crash in 1963. John Belushi (The Blues Brothers) died of a drug overdose in 1982.
March 6:
Richard Manuel (The Band) hanged himself in 1986.
March 8:
Ron “Pigpen” McKernan (The Grateful Dead) died in 1973 of a stomach hemorrhage and liver failure, brought on by alcohol poisoning. Adam Faith was taken by a heart attack in 2003 at the age of 62.
March 10:
Andy Gibb died in 1988 of an inflammatory heart virus. LaVern Baker had been suffering from diabetes and passed away at the age of 67 in 1997. Danny Joe Brown (lead singer of Molly Hatchet), died in 2005 after complications from diabetes.

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