January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
Timeline


This siteThe web
Search
E-mail
 
The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
March 11 - 17
Last Week   Next Week

 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s Colonel Tom Parker signed on as Elvis Presley’s manager in 1956. Parker discovered Elvis while managing country artist, Hank Snow. At one time Parker was a palm reader in a fairground show. Exactly one year later, Elvis bought the Graceland mansion.
 1950s Fats Domino hit number 1 on the R&B singles chart in 1957 with I’m Walkin’, replacing his own, Blue Monday. Domino would keep the top 40 hits coming for the next 5 years. In 1985, months before his death, Rick Nelson did a live duet with The Fat Man on I’m Walkin’, a song that Nelson also took to the top 10.
 1950s The Kingston Trio were nearly killed in an Indiana airplane crash in 1959. Their current hit, The Tijuana Jail, was climbing the charts and made it to number 12 a couple weeks later. John Stewart joined the group in 1961, and later had a solo hit with Gold, in 1979, with backing by Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham.
 1960s Ray Charles started his own record company in 1962. Tangerine Records soon became responsible for recording a new Jimmy Scott album, which was given the title, Falling in Love is Wonderful. It was released in early 1963, but was soon recalled when another record label claimed ownership of Scott’s contract. The LP finally got a limited re-release in 2003.
 1960s The Four Seasons were finishing a three week run at number 1 in 1963 with Walk Like a Man. It was their third number 1 in less than six months. Both, Sherry and Big Girls Don’t Cry spent 5 weeks at number 1 near the end of 1962.
 1960s Eric Clapton left The Yardbirds in 1965 due to musical differences with the other band members. Clapton wanted to continue in a bluesier mode, while the rest of the group preferred the more commercial appeal of the soon-to-be-released, For Your Love. Fleetwood Mac improved the song with their version on the Mystery to Me album. The classic track was written by Graham Gouldman, later of 10cc.
 1960s (Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay by Otis Redding was the number 1 song in the U.S. in 1968. It was recorded three days before the plane crash that killed Redding in December, 1967. In the U.K., Louis Armstrong had the top spot with What a Wonderful World.
 1960s The Bee Gees performed on The Ed Sullivan Show for the first time, in 1968. They performed Words and To Love Somebody. The Brothers Gibb had just released their album, Horizontal, which contained the hits, Massachusetts and World.
 1960s Featuring Boris Karloff on the cover, Life Magazine declared Jimi Hendrix “the most spectacular guitarist in the world” in 1968. Hendrix had released his first two albums up to that point, Are You Experienced? and Axis: Bold As Love, and would soon complete Electric Ladyland.
 1970s Marvin Gaye’s most successful singing partner, Tammi Terrell, died of complications from a brain tumour in 1970. The pair had half a dozen top 25 hits in the U.S., the biggest being Your Precious Love, You’re All I Need to Get By and Ain’t Nothing Like the Real Thing, all from the late 1960s. Gaye was devastated by the loss of his dear friend.
 1970s Jethro Tull released the classic Aqualung album in 1971. It was their first release to make the top 10 in the U.S. and included some of their best recordings in Cross-Eyed Mary, Locomotive Breath and the title track. Tull had already earned their only number 1 album at home in the U.K., with Stand Up in 1969, whereas the American charts wouldn’t be dominated until the following year.
 1970s A tragic event struck Los Angeles in 1972. A radio station played Donny Osmond’s version of Puppy Love over and over for 90 minutes straight. The song was previously a number 2 hit for it’s writer, Paul Anka. Osmond’s recording fell one position shy of the 1960 original.
 1970s Paul Simon’s, 50 Ways to Leave Your Lover, earned him a gold disc in 1976. It was taken from the 1975 album, Still Crazy After All These Years, which also contained the last studio recording by Simon and Garfunkel, My Little Town. At the time, Art Garfunkel was in peak form with his excellent Breakaway album, which also included My Little Town. Simon’s gold hit was nominated for a Grammy Award, but lost out for Record of the Year to George Benson’s, This Masquerade.
 1970s American Hot Wax, a film about rock and roll DJ legend Alan Freed, premiered in the U.S. in 1978. Jay Leno and Fran Drescher appeared in the movie, which also included Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis and Screamin’ Jay Hawkins. Many of the early rock ‘n’ roll songs spun by Freed and performed at his shows can be found on the 4 CD box set, Loud, Fast and Out of Control.
 1970s Elvis Costello found himself in hot water in 1979 after making racist comments about Ray Charles and James Brown. While on tour promoting his new Armed Forces album, Costello was at a Holiday Inn bar discussing British and American music with Stephen Stills and Bonnie Bramlett, when the remarks were made. Bramlett responded by punching Costello in the face, thereby ending the discussion. After much publicity about the incident, Costello held a press conference and apologized. Accidents Will Happen indeed.
 1980s Jealous Guy was taken to number 1 in the U.K. in 1981 this week by Roxy Music. It was their tribute to John Lennon, who had died a few months before, and was their only single to hit the top of the charts. The band is also well known for the 1975 track, Love is the Drug. Collective Soul contributed a recording of Jealous Guy to the 1995 Lennon tribute, Working Class Hero.
 1980s U2 hit the top of the U.K. albums chart for the first time in 1983 with their third LP, War. It contained the radio-friendly song, Sunday Bloody Sunday, and the top 10 single, New Year’s Day. U2’s first number 1 single came in the U.S. exactly 4 years later, from With or Without You, off The Joshua Tree album.
 1980s In 1987, Huey Lewis and The News had their third number 1 in the U.S. with Jacob’s Ladder. The song was also the third of six singles from their Fore! album. The track was written by Bruce Hornsby, and his version is available on the 1988, Scenes From the South Side release. Lewis had earlier produced several songs on Hornsby’s debut, The Way It Is.
 1990s Doc Pomus, songwriter of hits by Elvis Presley, The Drifters, Dion and The Belmonts, Gene McDaniels and Ben E. King, died this week in 1991. He teamed up with Mort Shuman in the late 1950s and inspired others who followed, like Neil Sedaka and Carole King. A tribute CD was released in 1995, with performances of his songs by Bob Dylan, B.B. King, Dion, Los Lobos and others.
 1990s A couple of weeks after winning 6 Grammys in 1993, Eric Clapton finally hit number 1 with his Unplugged album. It had been cruising in the top 10 for six months already, but the additional hype created by his haul at the annual awards ceremony pushed sales of his live album even higher. What’s odd is that Clapton’s performances on Unplugged were, for the most part, utterly lifeless, including his butcher job on the classic Layla track that was a bigger hit back when it was re-released in 1972. Unplugged beat out Achtung Baby, the Beauty and The Beast soundtrack and albums by Annie Lennox and kd lang for album of the year.
 1990s Meat Loaf had his single, Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through, peak at number 13 in the U.S. in 1994. It made a valiant effort at trying to match a five week run at number 1 by the previous hit, I’d Do Anything for Love (But I Won’t Do That), that won Meat Loaf a Grammy.
 1990s Paul McCartney was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1997. Wife Linda was ill at the time and did not accompany him to the ceremony. Sir Paul followed Cliff Richard and George Martin in being recognized for their musical contributions. Elton John, Bob Geldof and others have also since received knighthoods. Paul still has his M.B.E. award that was given to all four Beatles back in 1965, although John Lennon decided to return his in 1969.
 1990s The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) handed out its first set of diamond awards in 1999. Sixty-one albums and one single qualified for sales of over 10 million discs in the U.S. At the top of the list was The Eagles’ Greatest Hits, with over 25 million copies (it would sell another million by the end of the year). Other noteworthy recipients included Fleetwood Mac (Rumours, 18 million), Led Zeppelin (IV, 17 million), AC/DC (Back in Black, 16 million), Boston (debut album, 16 million), The Eagles (Hotel California, 15 million), Hootie and The Blowfish (Cracked Rear View, 15 million), Elton John (Greatest Hits, 15 million and Candle in the Wind 1997 single, 11 million), Pink Floyd (Dark Side of the Moon, 15 million and The Wall, 11 million albums), Meat Loaf (Bat Out of Hell, 13 million), Bon Jovi (Slippery When Wet, 12 million), Kenny Rogers , (Greatest Hits, 12 million), The Beatles (Abbey Road and Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, both 11 million), and James Taylor (Greatest Hits, 11 million). Just making it in at the 10 million level were Eric Clapton’s Unplugged, Best of The Doobie Brothers, Journey’s Greatest Hits, Carole King’s Tapestry, Lionel Richie’s Can’t Slow Down, The Joshua Tree from U2, Van Halen’s 1984 and debut albums, ZZ Top’s Eliminator and the soundtracks to The Lion King and Titanic.
 1990s Cher took 24 years, 11 months and 21 days to return to the number 1 position on the Billboard singles chart, when Believe hit the top in 1999. Dark Lady was her last top hit, and before that it was Half-Breed and Gypsys Tramps and Thieves. She also had a number 1 hit in 1965 with I Got You Babe, a duet with Sonny. Believe also won Cher a Grammy for the Best Pop Dance Recording.
 2000s Chris Isaak hit TV screens in 2001 when The Chris Isaak Show debuted on Showtime. Joining Isaak were members of his actual back-up band, Silvertone. Kenney Dale Johnson, Rowland Salley and Hershel Yatovitz were supplemented by actor/keyboard player, Jed Rees, for maximum comedic effect. The show was a huge success, and for its theme song, Isaak recorded a new track, American Boy, included on his 2002 album, Always Got Tonight.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

March 11:
George Kooymans (Golden Earring, 1948), Bobby McFerrin (1950) and Lisa Loeb (1968), came into the Twilight Zone of existence.
March 12:
Al Jarreau (1940), Jefferson Airplane’s, Paul Kantner (1942) and James Taylor (1948) were born Long Ago and Far Away.
March 13:
Neil Sedaka (1939) and Adam Clayton (U2, 1960) had their first chance for Steppin’ Out on this day.
March 14:
Phil Phillips (1931), Quincy Jones (1933) and Walter Parazaider (Chicago, 1945) floated into the world on a Sea of Love.
March 15:
Lightnin’ Hopkins (1912), Beach Boy, Mike Love (1941), Sly Stone (Sly & The Family Stone, 1944), guitarist Ry Cooder (1947) and Dee Snider (Twisted Sister, 1955) joined all other Everyday People.
March 16:
Nancy Wilson of Heart became a Little Queen in 1954.
March 17:
Nat King Cole (1917), The Lovin’ Spoonful’s main player John Sebastian (1944) and Mike Lindup (Level 42, 1959) all arrived at Six O’Clock (or thereabouts).
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

March 11:
Edmund Sylvers died at the age of 47 in 2004 of lung cancer.
March 12:
Jazz great, Charlie Parker died in 1955 of heart failure, pneumonia, and cirrhosis of the liver. He was only 34.
March 14:
Songwriter, Jerome “Doc” Pomus died in 1991 of lung cancer.
March 16:
Tammi Terrell died from a brain tumour in 1970. T-Bone Walker died in 1975 at the age of 64.
March 17:
Rick Grech (Blind Faith) died in 1990, from drug related causes.

Last Week   Next Week
 
July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
7 - 13    14 - 20    21 - 27
28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 31

 
Timeline

Shop at
Alex's CD World
Alex’s CD World
January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
Timeline
July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
7 - 13    14 - 20    21 - 27
28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 31

 
Timeline