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The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
March 25 - 31
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 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s Bobby Helms hit the U.S. country singles chart with Fraulein this week in 1957. The song would eventually hit number 1 and spend 52 weeks on the chart, longer than any other country song in the 1950s. Later in the year, he hit the top again with My Special Angel. Helms also released Jingle Bell Rock in ’57, which would return to the top 40 on two other occasions.
 1950s Little Richard had his last top 10 hit when Good Golly Miss Molly barely made it in 1958. It was from his last recording sessions for Specialty Records, after which he recorded a collection of gospel songs. The flip side of the hit was Hey, Hey, Hey, Hey, which The Beatles later put into a medley with Kansas City.
 1960s In 1963, the number one song on the U.S. Billboard singles chart was The Chiffons’, He’s So Fine. It stayed there for 4 weeks; so did George Harrison’s, My Sweet Lord, in December of 1970. Unfortunately for Beatle George, a 1976 court ruling found that he had subconsciously plagiarised The Chiffons’ hit. This is somewhat ironic, since it was Ringo Starr who was constantly rewriting past hits when he made his first attempts at songwriting while with The Beatles. The lyrics to Harrison’s 1976 single, This Song refer to losing the plagiarism case. “This song ain’t black or white and as far as I know, don’t infringe on anyone’s copyright, so... This tune ain’t bad or good and come ever what may, my expert tells me it’s okay.” This Song is from the 33 1/3 album, Harrison’s age at the time of release. In 1967 this week, George added pictures of Eastern gurus and religious leaders to the Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover shoot. Recording of the album also finished up this week. And in 1984, Yoko Ono lost $3 million dollars owed to producer Jack Douglas for his work on the Double Fantasy album.
 1960s Jeff Beck joined The Yardbirds in 1965. He played on the hits, Heart Full of Soul and Shapes of Things, before leaving in the fall of 1966. In the meantime, Jimmy Page had joined the band. The Yardbirds split up in 1968, at which time Page decided to form The New Yardbirds. He renamed them Led Zeppelin.
 1960s In 1967, Robert Plant released his second single, Our Song. Plant’s next solo single wouldn’t be issued for another 15 years. In the meantime, he took a small detour to sing some pretty heavy blues with Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones and John Bonham, a.k.a. Led Zeppelin. Burning Down One Side, from his 1982 album, Pictures at Eleven, barely made the top 50 on the U.S. singles chart.
 1960s Jimi Hendrix torched his guitar at what was later named The Rainbow Theatre. He shared the stage that 1967 night with The Walker Brothers (The Sun Ain’t Gonna Shine Any More), Cat Stevens and, believe it or not, Engelbert Humperdinck.
 1960s The last episode of The Monkees TV show was broadcast in 1968. It was their 58th show filmed in a little over 2 years. The series, starring Davy Jones, Michael Nesmith, Mickey Dolenz and Peter Tork was officially cancelled (as was Batman), by the hosting network a few months later. Tork would be the first to leave the group, later that same year, and his face would be conspicuously absent on the cover of the group’s next album, Instant Replay.
 1960s The soundtrack for the 1967 movie, The Graduate, was certified gold in 1968. Simon and Garfunkel had contributed several tracks, including the number 1 hit, Mrs. Robinson. The album has since sold over 2 million copies in the U.S.
 1970s A Horse With No Name from newcomers, America, was at number 1 in the U.S. this week in 1972. It spent 3 weeks there, at the same time that their debut album dominated the albums chart. They were often compared to Crosby, Stills Nash and Young, and oddly enough, it was Neil Young’s, Heart of Gold, that America replaced at the top of the singles chart. Other standout tracks on their self-titled album included I Need You and Sandman.
 1970s Dr. Hook and The Medicine Show made the cover of Rolling Stone Magazine in 1973, after their hit, The Cover of “Rolling Stone,” peaked at number 6 on the U.S. singles chart. A year earlier, Sylvia’s Mother had taken them into the top 10 for the first time. Several years later, they were back with another cover, after dropping “The Medicine Show.” This time they recorded a version of Only Sixteen, a minor hit for Sam Cooke back in 1959. Dr. Hook stayed on the charts for the next six years, adding A Little Bit More, Sharing the Night Together, When You’re in Love With a Beautiful Woman, Better Love Next Time, Sexy Eyes, Girls Can Get It and Baby Makes Her Blue Jeans Talk to the top 40.
 1970s Jerry Garcia, of The Grateful Dead, was pulled over for speeding in 1973. He got a $15 ticket and much more, after various illegal substances were found in his vehicle.
 1970s Lou Reed made his first and only appearance on the singles U.S. charts when he issued Walk On the Wild Side (produced by David Bowie and Mick Ronson), in 1973. Reed left The Velvet Underground in 1971, shortly after releasing the Loaded album which included the standout track, Sweet Jane.
 1970s All six albums that Led Zeppelin had released to that point were on the 1975 U.S. albums chart. They included Led Zeppelin I, II, III, IV, Houses of the Holy and their latest album, Physical Graffiti, which was at number 1. It remained at the top for six weeks until it was toppled by Chicago VIII.
 1970s Buddy Holly had his first number 1 album in the U.K. in 1978, when his 20 Golden Greats hit the top. It was released just a couple of months before Gary Busey starred in the movie about Holly’s life, The Buddy Holly Story.
 1970s Eric Clapton married Patti Boyd, George Harrison’s ex-wife, in 1979. George, Ringo and Paul were all in attendance. Slowhand had just released the single, If I Don’t Get There by Morning, from his Backless album, and was getting ready to set out on a world tour. Live performances from a stop at Budokan, Japan, would be recorded and released as a double album the following year.
 1980s Pink Floyd was in the middle of a four week run at number 1 on the U.S. singles chart in 1980 with Another Brick in the Wall (Part II). They had replaced Queen’s, Crazy Little Thing Called Love at the top position after its own four week stay. At the same time, Dark Side of the Moon had just overtaken the record set by Carole King’s Tapestry album, when Pink Floyd’s release from 1973 spent its 303rd week on the U.S. albums chart.
 1980s Mick Jagger made the U.S. singles chart as a solo act in 1985, when Just Another Night peaked at number 12. His biggest hit outside of The Rolling Stones would come later in the year when he teamed up with David Bowie, for Dancing in the Street. Lucky in Love would also make the top 40, and was the follow-up track from Jagger’s, She’s the Boss album.
 1980s Chicago continued the hits coming in the 1980s when You’re Not Alone peaked at number 10 in the U.S. in 1989. The single was extracted from the 1988 album, Chicago 19, which also included three bigger hits, I Don’t Wanna Live Without Your Love (number 3), Look Away (number 1) and What Kind of Man Would I Be? (number 5). Only one more hit for the band would follow. 1991’s Chasin’ the Wind, stalled at number 39.
 1990s In 1991, the Eurythmics’ Greatest Hits album sold more copies than the next six competitors on the albums chart, combined. The album contained their three, top 10 hits, Sweet Dreams, Here Comes the Rain Again and Would I Lie to You? Both Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart had been in The Tourists in the late 1970s and have released solo albums since leaving the Eurythmics. Their first studio album in ten years, Peace, was released in 1999.
 1990s Bryan Adams performed Have You Ever Really Loved a Woman? at the 68th Academy Awards ceremony in 1996. It was nominated for an Oscar after its inclusion in the movie, Don Juan DeMarco, starring Johnny Depp. The B-side to the CD single release was an even better track, called Low Life. The hits seemed to have dried up for Adams since Have You Ever Really Loved a Woman? spent five weeks at number 1.
 1990s Phil Collins left Genesis in 1996, to continue his solo career. Collins wanted to work on movie soundtracks and dabble in some more jazz projects (like he had in Brand X). His departure left Tony Banks and Mike Rutherford as the two remaining members of the group. They eventually added Ray Wilson to perform vocals on the very underrated Calling All Stations album the following year. Collins would release his Dance Into the Light album later in the year.
 2000s Jimmy Page won a court battle in 2000 against a British magazine. An article in Ministry Magazine claimed that Led Zeppelin’s guitarist stood by and watched drummer John Bonham die in 1980. Bonham had choked on his own vomit while asleep, and the magazine alleged that Page was nearby, casting a death spell while dressed in Satanic robes. Money awarded to Page was subsequently donated to the Action for Brazil’s Children Trust. At the time of the judicial settlement, Page and The Black Crowes were getting ready to make their Live at the Greek album available on-line. It was recorded in October of 1999, and would eventually make it into stores in the summer of 2000 with the Willie Dixon cover, Mellow Down Easy, added as a bonus track.
 2000s Brian Wilson was in the spotlight in 2001 at New York’s Radio City Music Hall. A three hour tribute was held in his honour, with guest performances by a wide variety of artists. Billy Joel contributed Don’t Worry Baby, while Paul Simon did an intimate version of Surfer Girl. Wilson Phillips made a rare appearance, as did The Go-Gos and the trio of Carly Simon, David Crosby and Jimmy Webb. Also singing Beach Boy songs were Ann and Nancy Wilson, Elton John, Aimee Mann and Brian Wilson himself when he took over the stage for the final three songs, Barbara Ann, Surfin’ U.S.A. and Fun, Fun, Fun.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

March 25:
Johnny Burnette (1934), Aretha Franklin (1942) and Elton John (1947) made it Through the Storm.
March 26:
Diana Ross (1944), Nash the Slash (Jeff Plewman, 1948), Richard Tandy (ELO, 1948) and Steven Tyler (Aerosmith, 1948) had to cross over to The Other Side.
March 27:
Sarah Vaughan (1924), Tony Banks (Genesis, 1950) and Mariah Carey (1970) were brought into the world by an Invisible Touch.
March 28:
Nashville guitarist Charlie McCoy became Good Time Charlie in 1941.
March 29:
Vangelis (1943), Terry Jacks (1946) and Bobby Kimball (Toto, 1947) arrived on Chariots of Fire.
March 30:
Slowhand (Eric Clapton, 1945), Dave Ball (Procol Harum, 1950), Tracy Chapman (1964) and Celine Dion (1968) were all born just After Midnight.
March 31:
Herb Alpert (1935), Mick Ralphs (Mott the Hoople, 1948) and Angus Young (AC/DC, 1959) joined All the Young Dudes.
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

March 26:
Drummer Randy Castillo died in 2002 of cancer. Jan Berry died at the age of 62 in 2004. Paul Hester, drummer with Crowded House, hanged himself in 2005.
March 27:
Ian Dury lost his battle with colon cancer in 2000, at the age of 57.
March 28:
Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup died at the age of 68 in 1974. Moe Koffman died from cancer in 2001.
March 29:
Mantovani passed away in 1980. He was 74.
March 31:
O’Kelly Isley died in 1986 of a heart attack.

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