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The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
April 29 - May 5
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 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s Elvis Presley recorded Jailhouse Rock this week in 1957. It became the first single to enter the U.K. charts at number 1. The song was written specifically for a scene in the movie of the same name. Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller wrote the track which stayed at number 1 in the U.S. for seven weeks.
 1950s In 1959, Domenico Modugno received the very first Record and Song of the Year Grammys for his rendition of Nel Blu Dipinto di Blu (Volaré) from 1958. He beat out Peggy Lee’s Fever, Catch a Falling Star by Perry Como, Witchcraft from Frank Sinatra and The Chipmunk Song. Album of the Year went to Henry Mancini for The Music from Peter Gunn, while The Champs had the Best Rhythm & Blues Performance with Tequila.
 1960s The Everly Brothers had their first hit for Warner Brothers Records with 1960’s, Cathy’s Clown. The duo previously had eight top 10 hits for Cadence Records, including Bye Bye Love, Wake Up Little Susie, All I Have to Do is Dream and (’Til) I Kissed You.
 1960s Jerry Lee Lewis, started out on a tour of the U.K. in 1962, just days after his son, Steve Allen, drowned in their swimming pool at home. The Killer’s first British tour virtually ended his successful career when it was discovered by reporters that he had married his 13 year old cousin.
 1960s The Shirelles had their second number 1 hit in the U.S. with Soldier Boy, in 1962. Will You Love Me Tomorrow was their first, and made them one of the earliest major girl groups. Other top 10 hits by The Shirelles included Dedicated to the One I Love, Mama Said, Baby It’s You and Foolish Little Girl. Shortly after their hits ran out, Diana Ross and friends would reign Supreme.
 1960s Even though Ed Sullivan wasn’t too impressed after a previous appearance, The Rolling Stones played his show in 1965. They performed The Last Time, Little Red Rooster, Everybody Needs Somebody and 2120 South Michigan Avenue. Also appearing on May 2nd were Tom Jones and Dusty Springfield. Taken from the Out of Our Heads album, The Last Time was beginning its second week at number 9, and two months later, Satisfaction would hit the top 10 and become the biggest song of the year.
 1960s Herman’s Hermits and The Zombies both had bigger hits in North America than in the U.K. The Hermits began their first U.S. tour this week, in 1965 (backed by The Zombies), and Peter Noone and the boys went on to have 18 songs make the top 40 in the U.S. They were more of a pop group as compared to British rock ‘n’ rollers like The Beatles or bluesier bands in the mold of The Rolling Stones or The Animals. The Zombies gave us hits like She’s Not There, Tell Her No and the psychedelic track, Time of the Season, released 2 years after the band broke up.
 1960s The Beatles made their final live appearance in the U.K. in 1966. They played for 15 minutes at the NME Poll Winners concert at Empire Pool, Wembley. Also on the bill were The Spencer Davis Group, The Fortunes, Herman’s Hermits, Roy Orbison, Cliff Richard, The Rolling Stones, The Seekers, The Small Faces, Dusty Springfield, The Walker Brothers, The Who and The Yardbirds. The Fab Four were not filmed because a financial agreement could not be reached.
 1960s Priscilla Beaulieu became Mrs. Presley in 1967. Elvis met Beaulieu in 1959 when she was just 14 years old, and when he returned from service in 1960, Beaulieu moved into The King’s, Graceland mansion. At least she wasn’t his cousin. That wouldn’t be right.
 1960s The Hair musical opened on Broadway in New York in 1968. It would last for 1750 performances, and featured songs like Aquarius / Let the Sunshine In, Good Morning Starshine, Easy to Be Hard and the title track, a hit for The Cowsills. Aquarius / Let the Sunshine In was in the middle of a 6 week run at number 1 for The 5th Dimension exactly one year later. The album was also at the top spot in 1969.
 1960s Buffalo Springfield disbanded in 1968 after recording three albums of original material. The good news is that the Looking Forward album by Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young came as a result of Young and Stephen Stills getting together to discuss the Buffalo Springfield box set. Stills also played his old Springfield buddy some songs that CSN were recording and Young asked to be a part of it. The new album also led to a short but highly successful tour.
 1960s Twiggy saw a 1968 performance by Welsh singer, Mary Hopkin, and immediately recommended her to Paul McCartney as a possible addition to the Apple Records roster. Hopkin was a guest on Opportunity Knocks, a television talent show, the day after she turned 18. Six months later her smash hit, Those Were the Days, was sitting behind The Beatles’, Hey Jude, in the number 2 position.
 1960s Jimi Hendrix was arrested on drug charges at Toronto International Airport in 1969. He was released on $10000 bail until his acquittal in December.
 1970s Four students were shot and killed by the National Guard at Kent State University in Ohio during an antiwar demonstration in 1970. Neil Young reacted to the senseless slayings by writing and recording the song, Ohio, with Crosby, Stills & Nash, the very next day. “Four dead in Ohio...,” David Crosby apparently wept, as the recording of the song faded out. Their version of Joni Mitchell’s, Woodstock, was approaching the top 10 on the singles chart at the time. It was already followed by Teach Your Children before Ohio was released. Both, Woodstock and Teach Your Children were taken from the Déjà Vu album. Ohio made it to number 14 in the summer of 1970.
 1970s In 1971, Gordon Lightfoot became one of the first rock ’n’ roll artists asked to perform at the classical-only, Philharmonic Hall in New York. He would play two shows the following February, as his If You Could Read My Mind and Summer Side of Life albums raced up the charts. Carole King and Kris Kristofferson were also invited to perform at the hall.
 1970s Styx II was certified gold this week in 1975. It contained the band’s first hit, Lady, which waited 2 years to make the top 10. Soon after their debut album for A&M Records, Equinox, was recorded, guitarist John Curulewski left the band and was replaced by Tommy Shaw.
 1970s Paul McCartney played live in the U.S. for the first time in almost ten years in 1976, when he opened the Wings Over America tour. Wings at the Speed of Sound was bobbing up and down between the number 1 and 2 spots of the albums chart, while Silly Love Songs was on its way to the top of the singles chart. A video from the tour, Rock Show, would be released four years later.
 1970s Mark Knopfler of Dire Straits, joined Bob Dylan in the Muscle Shoals studio in 1979 to work on Dylan’s next album, Slow Train Coming. It contained the single, Gotta Serve Somebody, parodied by John Lennon and included on his Anthology release from 1998 under the title, Serve Yourself.
 1970s The Who introduced their movie, Quadrophenia, as well as their new drummer, Kenny Jones, in 1979. Jones had been a member of The Small Faces with Steve Marriott and enjoyed the hit, Itchycoo Park in 1967.
 1980s In 1981, Sheena Easton took over the number 1 spot from Kiss On My List, a comeback of sorts by Hall and Oates. Morning Train (Nine to Five) was the first of seven top 10 hits for Easton, and was her only number 1.
 1980s The great bluesman, Muddy Waters (McKinley Morganfield), died in 1983. He was taken by a heart attack at the age of 68. Waters had been backed by other blues greats during his long career, including Willie Dixon, Otis Spann, Jimmy Rogers, Buddy Guy and others. His son, Big Bill Morganfield, has recently released his first album, Rising Son.
 1980s Deep Purple reunited in 1984 to release one of their best albums, Perfect Strangers. Two of the tracks, Knocking at Your Back Door and Perfect Strangers, were also included on their 1999 box set, Shades 1968-1998.
 1980s Mick Fleetwood filed for bankruptcy in 1984. The founder of Fleetwood Mac had last released The Visitor, a solo album from 1981. Although the critics loved it, The Visitor ended up losing a lot of money, as did Fleetwood’s real estate investments, leading to eventual financial ruin. Other members of Fleetwood Mac were doing fine with their solo albums, but would reconvene in 1987 for Tango in the Night.
 1980s Pink Floyd’s, Dark Side of the Moon, finally dropped off the U.S. albums chart in 1988 after a run of 725 weeks (almost 14 years).
 1990s A John Lennon tribute concert was held in 1990 in Liverpool. The performance was released on video. If you haven’t seen it, you haven’t missed anything, which is obviously why it wasn’t released on CD. Artists included on the video were Elton John, Paul McCartney, Billy Joel, Joe Cocker, Hall and Oates, David Bowie, Ringo Starr, Roy Orbison, Ray Charles and others.
 1990s Eric Clapton played tracks from his upcoming blues album, From the Cradle, at a New York benefit concert in 1994. It was the follow-up to his multi-million selling Unplugged release. A couple of days later at the World Music Awards, he was named the World’s Best-Selling Rock Artist of the Year, as well as the Best-Selling British Recording Artist of the Year.
 2000s The Memphis Rock ‘n’ Soul Museum opened in Memphis, Tennessee, in 2000. Artists such as Jerry Lee Lewis, Otis Redding, Elvis Presley, B.B. King, Ike Turner and Isaac Hayes are featured with music and memorabilia. The museum claims to be the starting place to experience the roots of modern music, and was created with the co-operation of the Smithsonian Institute.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

April 29:
Duke Ellington (1899), Lonnie Donegan (1931), Klaus Voorman (Manfred Mann, 1942) and Tommy James (1947) came in like a Ball of Fire.
April 30:
Willie Nelson (1933) and Bobby Vee (1943) were delivered into this Crazy World.
May 1:
Sonny James (1929), Judy Collins (1939), Rita Coolidge (1944) and Ray Parker Jr. (1954) had their parents at an All Time High.
May 2:
Lesley Gore (1946) and Lou Gramm (Foreigner, 1950) became the results of True Blue Love.
May 3:
Everything Was All Right when Bing Crosby (1903), Pete Seeger (1919), James Brown (1933), Frankie Valli (1937) and Christopher Cross (1951) were delivered.
May 4:
If you Turn Back the Hands of Time you will find that Dick Dale (1937) and Tyrone Davis (1938) were born on this day.
May 5:
Johnnie Taylor (1938) and Tammy Wynette (1942) will Testify that they celebrate birthdays.
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

April 30:
Muddy Waters passed away at the age of 68, in 1983. Darrell Sweet (Nazareth) died of a heart attack in 1999.
May 4:
Paul Butterfield died of drug-related heart failure in 1987.

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