January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
Timeline


This siteThe web
Search
E-mail
 
The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
May 20 - 26
Last Week   Next Week

 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s A Jimmie Rodgers Memorial Show was held in 1953, in which Elvis Presley took second place in the talent contest. He was still in high school at the time.
 1950s Fats Domino had one of his live appearances cancelled in 1955. Police were worried that the show at the Connecticut Ritz Ballroom might turn into a “rock and roll dance.” The authorities referred to a similar occurrence at a New Haven arena where near riots had to be broken up.
 1950s Chuck Berry recorded his first hit, Maybellene, in 1955. Originally titled, Ida Red, Maybellene was reworked in the studio, with backing by Chess Records’ main man, Willie Dixon. It was one of the few rock ‘n’ roll songs to appear that year, a time when Pat Boone, Frank Sinatra, Perry Como and The McGuire Sisters were going strong.
 1950s Jerry Lee Lewis had 34 of his 37 concert dates in the U.K. cancelled in 1958 when it was discovered that his new bride with him was also his 14 year old cousin. The Killer’s career was all downhill from there.
 1960s The Everly Brothers hit number 1 in 1960 with Cathy’s Clown. It was at the top for the first of five weeks, tying All I Have to Do is Dream from 1958, also spending over a month at the peak position. The new single was their first released on the Warner Brothers label, after switching over from Cadence.
 1960s The Isley Brothers released their 1962 cover of a song first recorded by The Top Notes a year earlier. Twist and Shout cracked the top 20 and was released on Wand Records. The Beatles, Elvin Bishop, The Mamas & The Papas, Tom Jones, The Kingsmen, The Who and even Van Halen have all covered the song since then.
 1960s Little Stevie Wonder recorded his first number 1 hit, Fingertips – Pt. 2, in 1963. It was at a Detroit concert, and the 7 minute song was edited into two parts for radio play. The full length version can be found on his box set from 1999, At the Close of a Century. Little Stevie had just turned 13 years of age when he performed the track.
 1960s A Whiter Shade of Pale by Procol Harum entered the U.K. singles chart in 1967, just as lead singer, Gary Brooker, was turning 22. John Lennon named it the best rock and roll song ever written.
 1960s Jimi Hendrix signed with Reprise Records, on the U.S. Warner Brothers label, in 1967. He gave them three albums, Are You Experienced?, Axis: Bold as Love and Electric Ladyland. The live, Band of Gypsys LP would be released on Capitol Records several months before his death.
 1960s The Easybeats peaked at number 16 in the U.S. in 1967 with their only hit, Friday On My Mind. The group was led by guitarist, George Young, older brother of the two AC/DC members. George later went into music production and more recently, produced Stiff Upper Lip, AC/DC’s album from 2000. Peter Frampton recorded an impressive version of Friday On My Mind for his 1981 album, Breaking All the Rules.
 1960s Simon and Garfunkel gave up the top position on the U.S. albums chart to themselves in 1968. The Graduate soundtrack dropped down to make room for Bookends. Both albums contained the number 1 hit, Mrs. Robinson.
 1970s None of The Beatles attended the 1970 U.K. premiere of the Let It Be film.
 1970s Peter Green left Fleetwood Mac in 1970. He wrote some of Mac’s best early work, including Black Magic Woman, Albatross, Oh Well and Rattlesnake Shake. Green’s final performance was at the Bath Festival.
 1970s Peter Cetera of Chicago sacrificed four teeth in the name of long hair when a gang of fans at a 1971 Cubs baseball game worked him over. Cetera spent five hours in surgery as a result. He was the band’s lead singer and bass player until he left for a solo career in 1985. The group had just released Lowdown as a single, which would bottom out at number 35 in the U.S. It was from the double album, Chicago III.
 1970s Nineteen year old Mike Oldfield released his Tubular Bells masterpiece this week in 1973. He played all but three of the instruments himself, including seven different types of guitars. The quadrophonic version of the album featured an airplane that sounded like it was flying around the four speakers. Oldfield was not impressed when he found out that an excerpt was used in the Exorcist film, starring Linda Blair.
 1970s Jefferson Starship prohibited from putting on a concert in 1977 because of a city ban on electronic instruments. The free event was to be held in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco. Two years later, the group would be allowed to play in the park when they debuted their new band line-up. At the time of the ban, Jefferson Starship was in between their Spitfire and Earth albums, and the non-event would inspire the hit years later, We Built This City.
 1970s The Buddy Holly Story premiered in Holly’s home town of Lubbock, Texas, in 1978. Actor Gary Busey played Charles Hardin Holley, earning an Oscar nomination for best actor. (He lost to Jon Voight for Coming Home.) Busey and the actors portraying The Crickets sang and played their own instruments. Although the accuracy of the movie is questionable, the musical numbers are well worth seeing.
 1970s The film biography of The Who’s, The Kids are Alright, premiered in New York in 1979. The album of the same name tied in with the movie and contained many live cuts. The title track is not on the album.
 1970s Elton John played the first of eight concerts in the USSR in 1979. He was the first solo rock artist outside of Russia to do so. John had recently returned to the charts with Mama Can’t Buy You Love, his first top 10 hit in 2½ years.
 1980s A medley of mostly Beatle songs was released by Stars On 45 in 1981. Jaap Eggermont, who previously had a drumming stint with Golden Earring, led the Dutch group of musicians. The lengthy hit single contained snippets of the songs Venus, Sugar Sugar, No Reply, I’ll Be Back, Drive My Car, Do You Want to Know a Secret, We Can Work It Out, I Should Have Known Better, Nowhere Man and You’re Going to Lose That Girl.
 1980s Stevie Ray Vaughan helped David Bowie’s single, Let’s Dance, reach number 1 this week in 1983. The album of the same name contained several other disco hits, including China Girl and Modern Love. The highlight of the album was Cat People.
 1980s Brothers in Arms debuted at number 1 in the U.K. in 1985. It was the fifth studio album by Dire Straits, which now included only two original members, Mark Knopfler and bass player John Illsley. The album produced the hits, So Far Away, Money for Nothing, Walk of Life, Brothers in Arms and Your Latest Trick, as well as the much played track, Why Worry. It would be more than six years later that their next album of original material, On Every Street, was released.
 1980s In 1989, just months after Roy Orbison died, his estate was sued by his publishing company because Orbison had failed to “live” up to the commitments of his latest contract. Orbison’s final album containing original material was 1992’s, King of Hearts.
 1990s Gene Clark, lead vocalist of The Byrds, died of a heart attack in 1991 at the age of 49. He had received major dental work and was taking prescription medication, which may have contributed to the attack.
 1990s Ringo Starr released one of his very best albums in 1992. Time Takes Time featured outstanding tracks like Weight of the World, Golden Blunders and Runaways. It was his first studio album since Old Wave, which wasn’t even released in most countries. Since 1990 when the All-Starr concerts began, Ringo has been recording and touring on a regular basis.
 1990s Chicago released their big band album, Night and Day, this week in 1995. It was pretty upbeat stuff, and included the song, Chicago, as well as the standards, In the Mood, Moonlight Serenade, Dream a Little Dream of Me, Don’t Get Around Much Any More and Take the “A” Train.
 1990s Eagles’ ladies man, Don Henley, finally tied the knot when he married model Sharon Summerall at his Malibu ranch in 1995. In attendance were pals, Glenn Frey, Joe Walsh, Timothy B. Schmit, David Crosby, Randy Newman, Jimmy Buffett, Jackson Browne, Billy Joel, Sting and Sheryl Crow. Henley’s first solo album was 1982’s, I Can’t Stand Still, but apparently he finally did, thirteen years later.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

May 20:
Joe Cocker (1944), Cher (1946) and Dave Thomas (Bob & Doug McKenzie, 1948) saw their lives Take Off.
May 21:
Tony Sheridan (1940), Ronald Isley (1941) and Leo Sayer (1948) were Easy to Love when they arrived.
May 22:
Bernie Taupin (Elton John’s songwriting partner) became a Honky Cat in 1950.
May 23:
Artie Shaw (1910) and Rosemary Clooney (1928) had their first opportunity to see Mangos on this day.
May 24:
Tommy Chong (Bobby Taylor & The Vancouvers, 1938), Bob Dylan (1941) and Patti LaBelle (1944) came in Like a Rolling Stone.
May 25:
Miles Davis (1926), Jessi Colter (1943) and Klaus Meine (The Scorpions, 1948) felt the Wind of Change.
May 26:
Moondog (Louis Hardin, 1916), Ray Ennis (The Swinging Blue Jeans, 1942), Levon Helm (The Band, 1942), Garry Peterson (The Guess Who, 1945), Mick Ronson (Bowie’s band / Mott the Hoople, 1946), Stevie Nicks (1948) and Lenny Kravitz (1964) joined All the Young Dudes on this day.
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

May 21:
Vaughn Monroe died in 1973 at the age of 61.
May 24:
The great Duke Ellington died of cancer in 1974 at the age of 75. Gene Clark (The Byrds) died of a heart attack in 1991. He was only 49 years old.
May 25:
Domenic Troiano died from cancer at the age of 59 in 2005.
May 26:
Little Willie John died in 1968 of pneumonia.

Last Week   Next Week
 
July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
7 - 13    14 - 20    21 - 27
28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 31

 
Timeline

Shop at
Alex's CD World
Alex’s CD World
January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
Timeline
July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
7 - 13    14 - 20    21 - 27
28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 31

 
Timeline