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The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
June 3 - 9
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 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1940s Glenn Wallichs started Capitol Records this week back in 1942. It has served as home to such artists as Eddie Cochran, Gene Vincent, Frank Sinatra, Bobby Darin, Dean Martin, Glen Campbell, The Beatles, The Beach Boys, Steve Miller, Dr. Hook, Bob Seger, Tina Turner, Heart and countless others.
 1950s An Ike Turner produced track featuring Jackie Brenston’s vocals, Rocket 88, was number 1 on the R&B singles chart in 1951. It is often cited as the very first rock ‘n’ roll record, and was released by Sun Records. Brenston was backed by the Delta Cats, which were actually the Kings of Rhythm, a band that Turner formed in high school.
 1950s Bill Haley renamed his Saddlemen group in 1953. They would now be known collectively as Bill Haley and His Comets, and by adding a drummer, moved from country music into more of a rockabilly style. Almost exactly one year later, Rock Around the Clock would be sitting at number 23 after selling 75000 copies in the U.S., before dropping off the charts. It would return in 1955 in a much bigger way.
 1950s Chuck Berry knows June 7th all too well. In 1957 two of his singles were released on competing record labels in the U.K. Roll Over Beethoven was put out by London Records and School Day was issued on the Columbia label. A cover of Berry’s, Come On by The Rolling Stones became their debut single this week in 1963. And in the same week in 1979, Berry played at the White House, and was also charged with income tax evasion going back to 1973. He was sentenced to five months in jail.
 1950s The Isley Brothers released The Angels Cried in 1957. The song for Teenage Records was their first single, it had a doo wop flavour to it, and was backed by The Cow Jumped Over the Moon. Neither track was a hit and they soon moved on to RCA Records where they recorded their infectious track, Shout. Eventually, in 1962, Twist and Shout cracked the top 20 and began an intermittent run of hits for the New Jersey trio, that extended into the 1970s.
 1950s Johnny Mathis’ Greatest Hits went to number 1 in 1958. It stayed on the charts for 490 weeks, setting a longevity record. That record would be broken in the 1980s by Pink Floyd’s, Dark Side of the Moon. It’s Not for Me to Say, The Twelfth of Never and the number 1 hit, Chances Are, were all included on the Greatest Hits album, as was his first hit, Wonderful! Wonderful!
 1960s Roy Orbison earned his first number 1 hit this week in 1961. Running Scared followed Only the Lonely (Know How I Feel) and Blue Angel into the top 10, where it spent a week above the rest. Orbison had to be coaxed into a soaring vocal at the climax of the song. Studio engineers couldn’t get a proper recording of his voice because it was being drowned out by the instrumental build-up, so Roy had to let it rip at the very end.
 1960s Ringo Starr collapsed from exhaustion during a 1964 photo session for the Saturday Evening Post. He rested for a couple of weeks while The Fifth Beatle, Jimmy Nicol, sat in on drums for shows in Denmark, Holland, Hong Kong and Australia. Ringo was taken to University College Hospital and was treated for tonsillitis and pharyngitis.
 1960s Not long after they had reconciled, Roy Orbison’s wife, Claudette, was killed when her motorcycle collided with a truck in 1966. She was only 25 when the accident occurred in Gallatin, Texas. Orbison had previously written a song about her, and The Everly Brothers had a hit with Claudette in 1958.
 1960s Blind Faith played their only live performance in 1969 in Hyde Park, London. Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood, Ginger Baker and Ric Grech produced just one album together, which included the popular songs, Can’t Find My Way Home and Presence of the Lord.
 1970s Gladys Knight and The Pips were musical guests on the final Ed Sullivan Show, in 1971.
 1970s Grand Funk broke The Beatles’ box office record in 1971 by selling out Shea Stadium in 72 hours, as their Survival album hit number 6 in the U.S. This was just a month after 150 reporters were invited to meet the group at a New York hotel and only six showed up. The Survival record included covers of Dave Mason’s, Feelin’ Alright and Gimme Shelter, originally by The Rolling Stones.
 1970s Manfred Mann mounted a comeback in 1971 when he reformed as Manfred Mann’s Earth Band, with Mick Rogers replacing Mike Hogg on vocals. A couple of singles were released, which were included on a self-titled album in February of the following year. But they would have to wait until 1976 to have international success when The Roaring Silence featured the smash single, Blinded By the Light. By this time, Chris Thompson had taken over on vocal duties. A remixed version of Spirits in the Night with Thompson’s superb voice made the top 40 in the U.S. this week in 1977. It can finally be found on CD on The Roaring Silence remaster.
 1970s The Doors had their last studio album of original material enter the top 10 this week in 1971. L.A. Woman peaked at number 9 in the U.S., and was the final record that featured the vocals of Jim Morrison. The strongest tracks on the LP were Love Her Madly, Riders On the Storm and the title track. Morrison was absent for much of the album’s recording.
 1970s Gram Parsons made his final live appearance in 1973. He performed at the Tower Theater in Philadelphia only days after playing in Baltimore. Between gigs, Parsons was working on his Grievous Angel studio album with the help of Emmylou Harris, which would be released in February the following year, five months after he died. The record included a duet on Love Hurts with Harris. Exactly 25 years later, Emmylou guested on Late Night With David Letterman to promote the current Lilith Fair tour. The highly successful series of concerts was organized by Sarah McLachlan, which Sheryl Crow abandoned on the same day as Emmylou’s TV appearance.
 1970s Rick Wakeman left Yes in 1974. He would return at the end of 1976, after releasing several successful solo albums, including The Six Wives of Henry VIII, Journey to the Centre of the Earth and The Myths and Legends of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. Wakeman and the boys had released Tales from Topographic Oceans in late 1973, and would work again in the studio on Going for the One in 1977.
 1970s Elton John took his 1975 album, Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy, to number 1 in its first week of release. No one had done this before. He did it again later in the year with Rock of the Westies. Since 1990, when chart positions began being determined very differently, it’s almost expected for a new album by a popular artist to go directly to number 1.
 1970s Just as Fool to Cry peaked at number 10 in America and number 6 in the U.K. in 1976, Keith Richards’ ten week old son died of pneumonia. Tara lost his fight in Switzerland while the band was performing in Paris, France, promoting their Black and Blue album.
 1970s Heart hit the top 40 in the U.S. for the first time when Crazy On You made number 35 in 1976. The parent album, Dreamboat Annie, and a second single, Magic Man, would both reach the top 10 four months later.
 1970s A rat being served up as dinner to Alice Cooper’s boa constrictor bit the snake and killed it in 1977. Cooper held public auditions to replace his valuable stage prop, and Angel was the winner to be taken on the road. Alice had just released his Lace and Whiskey album, which included the track, Road Rats, as well as the standouts You and Me, It’s Hot Tonight and the title track.
 1980s Simon and Garfunkel briefly reunited in 1982 for a nine date tour of Europe, beginning in Paris and ending at Wembley Stadium. The U.S. portion of the tour was shelved after the duo rediscovered their past conflicts and decided to return to solo projects. A successful live album recorded in New York’s Central Park the previous fall had been doing well on the albums chart.
 1980s Benny Mardones made 1980s bookends out of his song, Into the Night, when it re-entered the top 40 in the U.S. in 1989. The hit originally charted in 1980, stalling at number 11. It was reissued in ’89 and made another climb, but not quite as high this time. A newly recorded version was also released in 1989, but it was the original that got Mardones back on the radio.
 1980s The Doobie Brothers reformed in 1989 with original leader, Tom Johnston, and played the first of many U.S. concerts promoting the newly released, Cycles album. A single from the album, The Doctor, made it into the top 10, while the follow-up, Need a Little Taste of Love, stalled at number 45. The saxophone player performed live vocals on songs previously sung by Michael McDonald, who wasn’t in the reunited group.
 1980s The Raw and The Cooked album from The Fine Young Cannibals hit number 1 in 1989. It stuck at the top for 7 weeks and contained the hits, She Drives Me Crazy, Good Thing (both number 1), and Don’t Look Back.
 1990s Extreme took More Than Words to number 1 in the U.S. back in 1991. The song was one of the mellower tracks on Pornograffitti, which covered several musical styles, including the more upbeat follow-up single, Hole Hearted.
 1990s Van Halen cancelled its concert at Hamburg Docks in Germany in 1998, when Alex Van Halen was injured. Some plaster chunks from the ceiling decided to blanket the drummer, but only minor bruising to his arm resulted. The accident occurred during a soundcheck, a couple of months after their first tour began with Gary Cherone on lead vocals. Their only album with this new line-up, Van Halen III, stiffed on the charts.
 2000s Alice Cooper came under fire in 2000 when he released his latest album, Brutal Planet. One of the songs, Wicked Young Man, describes an adolescent with, “a pocket full of bullets and a blueprint of the school,” clearly a reference to the April 29, 1999 shootings at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado. Cooper said he wrote the song to, “let people know that if they see or know someone like this guy in the song, that they report him immediately.” Another track, Blow Me a Kiss, was also about Columbine. Critics feared that Cooper was sensationalizing the tragic event to gain publicity for his album.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

June 3:
Curtis Mayfield (1942), Ian Hunter (Mott the Hoople, 1946), Suzi Quatro (1950), Deniece Williams (1951) and Dan Hill (1954) came Stumblin’ In on this day.
June 4:
Relatives Wasted Days and Wasted Nights waiting for the arrival of Freddy Fender (1937), Gordon Waller (Peter & Gordon, 1945) and Jimmy McCulloch (Wings, 1953) .
June 5:
Tom Evans (Badfinger) wore his first Baby Blue in 1947.
June 6:
The doctor heard The Same Old Song of crying when Levi Stubbs (The Four Tops, 1936), Gary U.S. Bonds (1939), Joe Stampley (1943) and Edgar Froese (Tangerine Dream, 1944) arrived.
June 7:
It’s Not Unusual for Tom Jones (1940) and Joey Scarbury (1955) to mark their birthdays on this day.
June 8:
The families of Chuck Negron (Three Dog Night, 1942), Boz Scaggs (1944), Bonnie Tyler (1953) and Mick Hucknall (Simply Red, 1960) had reason to Celebrate.
June 9:
Les Paul (1916), Johnny Ace (1929), Jackie Wilson (1934) and Jon Lord (Deep Purple, 1941) each became a Child in Time.
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

June 4:
Ronnie Lane (The Small Faces), died from multiple sclerosis in 1997.
June 5:
Mel Tormé passed away at the age of 73 in 1999, from complications caused by a stroke. Dee Dee Ramone died of a drug overdose in 2002.
June 6:
Claudette Orbison, wife of Roy, was killed in a motorcycle accident in 1966.

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26 - Sep 1

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28 - Nov 3

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