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The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
June 10 - 16
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 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s Four recordings of Unchained Melody battled it out on the U.K. singles chart in 1955. Jimmy Young was first to chart, followed by Al Hibbler, Les Baxter and then Liberace. Their highest positions were numbers 1, 2, 10 and 20, respectively.
 1950s Fats Domino hit number 1 on the U.S. R&B singles chart for the first of 11 weeks in 1955, with Ain’t It a Shame (also known as Ain’t That a Shame). The song would peak at the bottom of the top 10 on the pop charts, but would be forever identified as a classic rock ‘n’ roll song.
 1950s Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On entered the singles chart in 1957. It was Jerry Lee Lewis’ first hit single, and eventually made it to number 3. It was followed by Great Balls of Fire, Breathless, High School Confidential and What’d I Say, all released on the Sun label.
 1960s In 1961, Ricky Nelson’s, Travellin’ Man climbed back up to the top to spend its second week at number 1, displacing Roy Orbison’s, Running Scared. It would be Nelson’s last number 1 hit, although he would have another half dozen hits make the top 10.
 1960s A Japanese artist hit the top of the singles chart in 1963 with Sukiyaki. It was performed by 21 year-old, Kyu Sakamoto. A Taste of Honey brought the song back in 1981, taking it to number 3. The song was one of the top pop hits of 1963.
 1960s Paul McCartney went into the studio in 1965 for the first of two days to record a new song he had written. None of the other Beatles performed on the track that would become the most recorded song in history. Yesterday hit number 1 in the U.S. later in the year, but wouldn't be released as a single in the U.K. until 1976.
 1960s Janis Joplin played her first concert after joining Big Brother and The Holding Company in 1966. The following year, they gained popularity with songs like, Bye Bye Baby, Blind Man and Down On Me, from their first Big Brother and The Holding Company album.
 1960s The Dave Clark Five set an appearance record for the Ed Sullivan Show in 1966. It was their twelfth performance, underlining the fact that the band was far more popular in the U.S. than in their home country.
 1960s The Monterey Pop Festival took place in 1967. Many of rock and roll’s finest appeared, including Otis Redding, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Simon and Garfunkel, Eric Burdon and The Animals, The Association, Booker T. and The MGs, David Crosby, Steve Miller, Canned Heat, The Mamas and The Papas, The Grateful Dead, The Who, Jefferson Airplane and The Byrds. Apparently, all artists played for free, with the exception of Ravi Shankar. John Phillips, of The Mamas and The Papas, wrote the hit, San Francisco (Be Sure To Wear Flowers In Your Hair), about the festival for Scott McKenzie to record. It was a huge hit. Over 200000 people attended the three day event.
 1960s Marc Bolan placed an ad in Melody Maker in 1967, looking for some bandmates. It read, “Freaky lead guitarist, bass guitarist and drummer wanted for Marc Bolan’s new group. Also any other astral flyers like with cars, amplification and that which never grows in window boxes.” OK. Steve Took and Ben Cartland answered and joined the band. They would release their first album a year later. It’s full title was, My People Were Fair and Had Sky in Their Hair But Now They’re Content to Wear Stars On Their Brows.
 1960s The Kingston Trio gave their very last concert in 1967 at The Hungry i. The final two songs performed were Where Have All the Flowers Gone? and Scotch and Soda. Several different line-ups of the group have toured since then. The last album by the original version of the band was Children of the Morning from the previous year.
 1970s In 1970, The Beatles had their last original single, The Long and Winding Road, hit number 1. Since then, they’ve had moderate success with Got to Get You Into My Life and Back in the USSR (1976), The BeatlesMovie Medley (1982), Twist and Shout (1986, because of its inclusion in the movies, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off and Back to School), Baby It’s You, and Free As a Bird (both 1995) and Real Love (1996).
 1970s Grand Funk spent a wad of cash in 1970 to promote their third album. Pedestrians in the Times Square area of New York were treated to a billboard that was a block long. It cost the group $100000 for the ad announcing the release of the Closer to Home album.
 1970s Bo Diddley appeared at a rock ‘n’ roll revival concert in 1971, at Madison Square Garden in New York. It was officially the sixth 1950s Rock and Roll Revival Concert to be held. Diddley would return for several more of these concerts over the years. His album, Another Dimension, released later in the year was not one of his best, so he continued playing live to pay the bills.
 1970s Clyde McPhatter died of a heart attack (aggravated by alcohol abuse), in 1972 at the age of 39. He had been the original lead vocalist with The Drifters before having solo hits like A Lover’s Question and Lover Please.
 1970s In 1976, AC/DC headlined their first concerts in Scotland, where several of the members were born. Their U.S. record company had just reissued the High Voltage album, made up of tracks from the original High Voltage LP and their second release, TNT.
 1970s Leo Sayer had his biggest album success when Endless Flight sneaked into the top 10 in the U.S. in 1977. The LP contained three hit singles in You Make Me Feel Like Dancing, When I Need You and How Much Love. He improved on his Just a Boy record from 1975, which stalled at position 16. It featured his first hit single, Long Tall Glasses (I Can Dance).
 1980s 1980 saw the release of The Blues Brothers movie. It featured John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd, Ray Charles, Aretha Franklin, James Brown and John Lee Hooker.
 1980s Roadie the movie opened this week in the U.S. in 1980. Meat Loaf starred as a road manager for rock groups, trying to solve all problems thrown his way by spoiled rock stars. The movie included a guest appearance by Roy Orbison, whose duet with Emmylou Harris, That Lovin’ You Feeling Again, was included on the soundtrack. Also featured on the double album were Styx, Alice Cooper, Cheap Trick and others. No, it hasn’t made it onto CD yet. The country style duet won a Grammy for Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group.
 1980s A peace rally was held in 1982, in New York’s Central Park. Jackson Browne, Linda Ronstadt, Gary U.S. Bonds and others performed in front of half a million people.
 1980s Tears for Fears’ first number 1 hit, Everybody Wants to Rule the World, spent its second of two weeks at the top in the U.S. in 1985. It was probably the best song to come out of the 1980s. Shout, also on the Songs From the Big Chair album, followed it to number 1 a couple of months later. But after 1989’s, The Seeds of Love album, Curt Smith departed, leaving Roland Orzabal with the Tears for Fears name. A revamped version titled, Everybody Wants to RUN the World, was released and went to number 5 in the U.K. almost exactly a year later. It was written for Sport Aid Week to raise funds for African famine relief.
 1980s The 25th Anniversary of Amnesty International was celebrated in 1986 with a New Jersey concert headlined by U2 and Sting.
 1980s Bette Midler hit number 1 this week in 1989 with Wind Beneath My Wings. The song was featured in the Beaches movie from that year, in which Midler starred. She had been absent from the top 10 for most of the decade.
 1990s The Rolling Stones had their song, Paint It Black, hit number 1 for the second time in the Netherlands. The year was 1990, twenty-four years after the first time it topped the singles chart. The song was included the previous year on their Singles Collection box set.
 1990s The publishers of John Lee Hooker’s famous Boogie Chillen track filed a lawsuit against ZZ Top in 1992. The legal action claimed that La Grange had ripped off Hooker’s song from 1948. ZZ Top was successful in its defence when the suit was dismissed five months later. La Grange was a very popular track from their 1973, Tres Hombres LP.
 1990s Irish blues rocker, Rory Gallagher, died in 1995 two months after a liver transplant. Gallagher was known for his energetic live shows, which translated quite nicely to his albums. Highlights of his music catalogue include Live in Europe from 1972 and Irish Tour ’74.
 1990s Have You Ever Really Loved a Woman?, from Bryan Adams, spent its second of five weeks at number 1 this week in 1995. The song was from the Don Juan DeMarco soundtrack, and was also included on the 18 ’Til I Die album. Even better was the single’s B-side, Low Life. It was not available on any album.
 1990s Barry White received a message from above during one of his 1996 concerts. The “baritone of love” was performing at an outdoor concert in Boston when an airplane presented him with instructions to call a local radio station. White finished the show and then phoned the two DJs responsible for the $1800 message, and granted them an interview. The Icon is Love album from 1994 was a huge comeback for White, whose previous success came mostly in the ’70s with ballads of seduction like Can’t Get Enough of Your Love, Babe and You’re the First, the Last, My Everything.
 2000s Ronnie Spector and the other Ronettes were awarded $2.6 million in back royalties in 2000. Ex-husband Phil Spector had been keeping the profits to himself, and was finally ordered to pay the money to the successful girl group he produced in the 1960s. Sisters Veronica Bennett and Estelle Bennett Vann, and cousin Nedra Talley Ross had been performing together since 1959, when Phil Spector signed them to his own Philles label. He recorded Be My Baby with the trio in 1963, but only a few minor hits followed over the next several years. In 1968, Ronnie Spector split from the group and married the hit producer, but solo hits never came. Since leaving Phil Spector in 1974, Ronnie has worked with other artists, including a stint as guest vocalist on the 1986 hit for Eddie Money, Take Me Home Tonight.
 2000s Johnnie B. Goode? Not in 2001 this week. Johnnie Johnson got the green light to proceed with a lawsuit against Chuck Berry, claiming that Johnson had co-written many of Berry’s hits. Songs like Roll Over Beethoven and Sweet Little Sixteen apparently would never have seen the light of day if Johnson, Berry’s piano player, hadn’t written the music first. Berry had even composed Johnny B. Goode to honour his sideman, who was later inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Johnson was looking to get millions of dollars in back royalties from the past 40 odd years.
 2000s Ray Charles dug deep into his pocketbook in 2001. He presented Albany State University with a cheque for $1 million. Another million would follow in a year’s time, in honour of Charles’ mother, Retha Robinson. The university had set plans to name a theatre after Robinson, and would also later grant Charles an honorary doctorate degree in philosophy. That should be useful.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

June 10:
Howlin’ Wolf was officially Mama’s Baby in 1910.
June 11:
It was Like No Other Night when Joey Dee (1940), Frank Beard (ZZ Top, 1949) and Donnie Van Zant (.38 Special, 1952) were born.
June 12:
Chick Corea (Return to Forever, 1941), Reg Presley (The Troggs, 1943), Bun E. Carlos (Cheap Trick, 1951) and Brad Delp (Boston, 1951) had to finally Surrender to the world.
June 13:
Bobby Freeman (1940), Howard Leese (Heart, 1951) and Bo Donaldson (1954) had to Shimmy Shimmy into the world.
June 14:
A Little Bitty Tear was shed when Burl Ives (1909), Rod Argent (1945) and Alan White (Yes, 1949) were born.
June 15:
Harry Nilsson (1941), Russell Hitchcock (Air Supply, 1949), Steve Walsh (Kansas, 1951) and Terri Gibbs (1954) reached the Point of Know Return.
June 16:
The Wheels of Life were set in motion with the arrival of Lamont Dozier (songwriter, 1941), Eddie Levert (The O’Jays, 1942), Pete Rivera (Rare Earth, 1945), Ian Matthews (1946) and Gino Vannelli (1952).
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

June 10:
Addie ‘Micki’ Harris of The Shirelles died in 1982 of a heart attack at the age of 42. Ray Charles died of acute liver disease in 2004.
June 12:
Jimmy Dorsey died of cancer at the age of 53, in 1957. Johnny Bond died in Burbank in 1978, just after his 62nd birthday.
June 13:
Clyde McPhatter (The Drifters) died of a heart attack in 1972. Benny Goodman passed away in New York at the age of 77, in 1986.
June 14:
Wynonie Harris died in 1969 of throat cancer. Rory Gallagher died from complications following a liver transplant in 1995.

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