January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
Timeline


This siteThe web
Search
E-mail
 
The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
June 24 - 30
Last Week   Next Week

 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s The Drifters recorded one of their earliest singles, Lucille, in 1953. Clyde McPhatter was on lead vocals, but the group wouldn’t see significant chart action until after he left in 1955. Fools Fall in Love hit number 69 in 1957, but it was There Goes My Baby from 1959, featuring new lead singer, Ben E. King, that would soar to number 2. He went solo in 1961.
 1960s Bobby Vee performed at Alan Freed’s outdoor rock show at the Hollywood Bowl in 1961. He was coming off two, top 10 hits the previous year with Devil or Angel and Rubber Ball. Stayin’ In was the current single but it stalled at number 33. Several months later, Vee would have his biggest hit, Take Good Care of My Baby, which hovered at the top for 3 weeks. Also on the bill at the California concert were Jerry Lee Lewis, Brenda Lee, The Shirelles and several others.
 1960s Following In His Own Write from 1964, John Lennon’s second book, A Spaniard in the Works, was published in 1965.
 1960s Zal Yanovsky quit The Lovin’ Spoonful in 1967. He had had enough after a performance in New York at the Forest Hills Music Festival. The group had released a soundtrack to the movie, You’re a Big Boy Now, the previous month. It was their second soundtrack, following What’s Up Tiger Lily? and was created for the Francis Ford Coppola movie.
 1960s The Beatles were bounced off a satellite in 1967, to TV screens around the world. They were contributing their part in the global telecast of Our World. Over 400 million saw the Fab Four perform All You Need is Love in Abbey Road studios. As the song fades out, The Beatles can be heard singing, “She Loves You, Yeah, Yeah, Yeah.”
 1960s An Elvis Presley TV special was filmed for NBC in 1968. It was described as a comeback by critics, as Presley rocked out on many of his early recordings, including That’s All Right Mama, Lawdy Miss Clawdy and Blue Suede Shoes. A soundtrack album (titled Elvis), was released and made the top 10 in the U.S., his first in three years.
 1960s Shorty Long drowned near Sandwich Island in Ontario, Canada, in 1969. His boat capsized and left him stranded at the age of only 29. Long had a big hit the previous year with the novelty track, Here Comes the Judge. The title was a popular catch-phrase on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In television show. The song made the top 10 in the U.S. in the summer of 1968.
 1970s The Turtles finally had enough with their White Whale record label in 1970, and refused to complete their latest album, Shell Shock. This proved to be the beginning of the end, as the group soon fell apart, leaving Shell Shock in the vaults until 1987. The label had no new material, so they released Eve of Destruction as a single. Barry McGuire had a number 1 hit with the song back in 1965, but The Turtles version from their first album was much better. Unfortunately, it barely made the top 100, as leaders, Mark Volman and Howard Kaylan, moved on to work with Frank Zappa.
 1970s American Pie received its first airplay in 1971 this week. It was set spinning on station WNEW in New York. The song’s eight minutes and thirty-six seconds had to be spread over two sides of the single. Don McLean still refuses to discuss the exact meaning of the lyrics, but some elements of it are clear, such as Buddy Holly’s death marking “the day the music died.”
 1970s A British Invasion revival concert was held at Madison Square Garden in New York this week in 1973. Wayne Fontana, Gerry and The Pacemakers, The Searchers and Herman’s Hermits all performed. None of the artists had experienced a hit in the U.S. in at least five years. The last was I Can Take or Leave Your Loving by Herman’s Hermits in early 1968.
 1970s George Harrison had the number 1 song in 1973 this week with, Give Me Love (Give Me Peace On Earth).
 1970s Neil Peart replaced John Rutsey as Rush’s drummer in 1974. Rush had already released their self-titled album when Rutsey decided to quit. In the Mood, taken from the album as a single, was a minor hit in Canada.
 1970s Sonny and Cher were divorced in 1975 after 11 years of marriage. Four days later, Cher married Gregg Allman. The newlyweds split 10 days after that, got back together, split again and then stuck it out for a total of three years, producing Elijah Blue Allman along the way. Salvatore Bono had met Cherilyn Sarkasian LaPiere at a coffee shop next to a Los Angeles radio station, in 1963. Sonny Bono had been working as a production assistant to Phil Spector, and had done some writing on the side in the form of songs like Needles and Pins and Koko Joe. As Caesar and Cleo, Sonny and Cher released The Letter, and then under the solo name, Bonnie Jo Mason, Cher issued Ringo I Love You in 1964 At this time, Cher still couldn’t handle the idea of being solo, and dragged a reluctant Sonny back into the act. By 1965 they were officially Sonny and Cher, and finally made it big when I Got You Babe hit number 1. The couple would have a number of other hits until 1972, when things really began to fall apart.
 1970s Elvis Presley played his final concert in 1977. He was named Favourite Variety Star and Favourite Rock Music Star the previous week, by Photoplay magazine. Presley would die less than two months later. The last two songs The King performed were Hurt and Bridge Over Troubled Water, and before the Indianapolis show at Market Square Arena, Elvis was presented with a plaque commemorating the 2 billionth record to come out of RCA’s pressing plant in the city. His new Moody Blue album was being manufactured when the milestone was reached.
 1970s The Sweet had their final chart successes this week when Love is Like Oxygen made the top 10 all over the world in 1978. The album containing the full length version, Level Headed, peaked at number 52 in the U.S. The group had several minor U.K. hits in the early ’70s before Little Willy gave them international attention. It was soon followed by Ballroom Blitz, Fox On the Run and Action, before Love is Like Oxygen brought them back after a two year absence on the charts. Brian Connolly, lead singer of the group, left for a solo career shortly after.
 1980s Jerry Lee Lewis almost had to change his name from The Killer to The Killed in 1981. He was rushed to a Memphis hospital, suffering from a haemorrhaging stomach ulcer. Doctors gave him a 50-50 chance of surviving after two operations were performed. Jerry Lee was back in the studio recording an album for MCA Records four months later, however nothing would be released until 1983.
 1980s In 1983, The Everly Brothers announced that they would be reuniting after a 10 year split. A September performance at the Royal Albert Hall in London was planned. The results were digitally recorded for The Reunion Concert album.
 1980s Huey Lewis and The News had their Sports album hit number 1 on the U.S. albums chart for its only week in 1984. The LP produced a string of hits, including Heart and Soul, I Want a New Drug, The Heart of Rock & Roll, If This Is It (all top 10), and Walking On a Thin Line, which was arguably the best track on the album. The group would have many more hit singles, and another number 1 album, before the end of the decade. Sports would go on to sell over 7 million American copies.
 1980s In Too Deep, a track on the Invisible Touch album, gave Genesis its fifth top 10 single from the same LP in 1987, when it hit number 3 in the U.S. The band was at its commercial peak, releasing music that closely followed the career of Phil Collins. Collins finally left in the 1990s, allowing the group to return to its more creative style of music, with Ray Wilson on lead vocals. Calling All Stations is definitely worth a listen.
 1980s The Who started their ten millionth farewell tour in 1989. They played in Toronto, where the previous final tour had finished in 1982 and had produced the Who’s Last live album.
 1990s Elton John and Eric Clapton headlined a show at Wembley Stadium in 1992. At their request, Bonnie Raitt opened the show. John had recently released the album, The One, while Clapton was burning up the charts with a tribute to his son, Conor, titled Tears in Heaven. Raitt’s 1990 release, Nick of Time, netted her four Grammys. John and Clapton would release the single, Runaway Train, the following month. One version of the CD single also contained a 9½ minute version of Understanding Women, a song from John’s album, The One. The cover art for The One was designed by the late Gianni Versacé.
 1990s In 1994, the appropriately titled Aerosmith track, Head First, became the first song by a major artist to be available for download on the Internet. It was promoted by CompuServe and Geffen Records as a free track that would never again see the light of day. The 5 minute song was soon included as a B-side on the Eat the Rich CD single. Fans would have a week to access the track at CompuServe, at which point they would endure an hour’s worth of download time before finally being able to hear the song played on their computers.
 1990s Pearl Jam cancelled their current tour in 1995 because of Ticketmaster. Group members felt that the ticket company was gouging fans with exorbitant surcharges, and decided that enough was enough. Pearl Jam’s first album, Ten, had just reached sales in the U.S. of over 9 million copies, fuelled by the Jeremy single and its striking video.
 1990s Pink Floyd had the number 1 album in the U.S. in 1995 this week when Pulse hit the top. It was a double live release which featured a complete performance of the Dark Side of the Moon LP. The packaging included a red flashing light powered by 2 AA cells. If yours have died, you might want to at least remove the old batteries so that they don’t corrode and destroy the cardboard case.
 1990s Bob Seger drove his BMW off the Trans-Canada Highway in Nipigon, Ontario, in 1997. It went like a live bullet off the side of the road, and earned Seger a court date a month later. He hadn’t released an album of new material since 1995’s mediocre effort, It’s a Mystery.
 1990s Dark Side of the Moon spent its 1056th week on the Billboard charts at the number 1 position of the Top Pop Catalog survey in 1997. It had been rumoured that if the classic Pink Floyd album was played while watching The Wizard of Oz movie, and started exactly when the MGM lion roared the third time during the movie’s intro, very interesting connections are made between the two.
 1990s Gordon Lightfoot, Bryan Adams and Anne Murray each officially received a granite star on Canada’s Walk of Fame, on King Street in Toronto, in 1998. They were the first three pop artists to be honoured into the newly recognized group of Canadian stars. Rush and Celine Dion were added a year later, followed by Neil Young and Joni Mitchell in 2000. They were also each presented with a take-home brass and granite trophy, topped with a star created in the likeness of a maple leaf.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

June 24:
Mick Fleetwood (Fleetwood Mac, 1942), Jeff Beck (1944), Arthur Brown (1944), Colin Blunstone (The Zombies, 1945), Patrick Moraz (The Moody Blues / Yes, 1948), Curt Smith (Tears for Fears, 1961) and Glenn Medeiros (1970) first heard Mothers Talk.
June 25:
Eddie Floyd (1935), Carly Simon (1945), Ian McDonald (King Crimson / Foreigner, 1946), Tim Finn (Split Enz / Crowded House, 1952) and David Paich (Toto, 1954) arrived after much Anticipation.
June 26:
Big Bill Broonzy (1893), Colonel Tom Parker (Elvis Presley’s manager, 1909), Billy Davis Jr. (The 5th Dimension, 1940), Georgie Fame (1943), Jean Knight (1943), Chris Isaak (1956) and Patty Smyth (Scandal, 1957) received a California Soul.
June 27:
Songwriter, Doc Pomus (1925), and Bruce Johnston (The Beach Boys, 1944) had to Surrender to the world on this day.
June 28:
Bobby Harrison (1943) and Dave Knights (1945, both of Procol Harum) were A Whiter Shade of Pale upon arrival.
June 29:
They were doing the Locomotion when Little Eva (1945) and Ian Paice (Deep Purple, 1948) were born.
June 30:
The delivery team went into Action when Florence Ballard (The Supremes, 1943), Glenn Shorrock (The Little River Band, 1944) and Andy Scott (The Sweet, 1951) arrived.
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

June 25:
Johnny Mercer passed away at the age of 66 in 1976. Songwriter, Boudleaux Bryant, died in 1987 in Knoxville. He was 67.
June 27:
John Entwistle, bass player for The Who, and Billboard Magazine editor Timothy White died from heart attacks in 2002.
June 29:
Shorty Long drowned in 1969. Rosemary Clooney died of lung cancer in 2002.
June 30:
Chet Atkins died of cancer in 2001 at the age of 77.

Last Week   Next Week
 
July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
7 - 13    14 - 20    21 - 27
28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 31

 
Timeline

Shop at
Alex's CD World
Alex’s CD World
January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
Timeline
July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
7 - 13    14 - 20    21 - 27
28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 31

 
Timeline