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The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
July 8 - 14
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 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s Sam Phillips signed truck driver, Elvis Presley, to Sun Records in 1954. Presley had stopped in twice before to make private recordings. Phillips originally wanted to use the 19 year old to make demos of songs meant for other artists, but soon realized that here was the man who could bridge the gap between white and black performances. Presley was obviously white, but sounded black. At the time, many radio stations would only play records from white performers, so artists such as Pat Boone and The Crew Cuts covered the songs of black singers. Unfairly, the white record would become the hit, even though it was almost always inferior to the original. (Listen to the original version of Sh-Boom, by The Chords, for example.)
 1950s The rock and roll era was ushered in when (We’re Gonna) Rock Around the Clock hit number 1 this week in the U.S. in 1955. Eight weeks later, things temporarily quieted down when more contemporary songs dominated the charts. But too much attention had been gained all over the world for the sounds of rock and roll to stay away for very long. Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis and many others were waiting in the wings. Bill Haley had just turned 30 when (We’re Gonna) Rock Around the Clock took off, and fans just couldn’t see him leading them on the rock and roll journey ahead. But early in 1956 they found their man in Elvis Presley.
 1960s Bobby Lewis hit the top of the charts in 1961 with Tossin’ and Turnin’. The song hung in at number 1 for seven weeks, making it the best song of the year. Very few male solo artists have had a single as successful. Elvis Presley, Bobby Darin, Marvin Gaye and Bryan Adams have also recorded songs with great staying power. Lewis had only one more top 10 single, One Track Mind, later the same year.
 1960s The Dave Clark Five had their movie, Catch Us If You Can, premiere in London in 1965. The film was renamed to Having a Wild Weekend for its U.S. debut. Songs featured by the group in the movie included Catch Us If You Can, Having a Wild Weekend and I Can’t Stand It.
 1960s Dennis Edwards, newest member of The Temptations, performed live for the first time with the group in 1968. David Ruffin had just left for a solo career, but The Temptations kept right on burning up the charts with songs like, Cloud Nine, I’m Gonna Make You Love Me, Runaway Child Running Wild, I Can’t Get Next to You, Psychedelic Shack, Ball of Confusion, Just My Imagination, Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone, and Masterpiece. Edwards had been with The Contours and stayed on until the mid-1970s.
 1960s David Bowie’s, Space Oddity, was released as a single for the first time in 1969. It was timed to coincide with the Apollo moon landing but had to be re-released before it became a hit, later in the year in the U.K. but not until 1973 in the U.S.
 1970s Mott the Hoople had to pay for some damages incurred at their 1971 concert. The group performed at the Royal Albert Hall in London, and were accused of causing a riot. Rock concerts at the venue were temporarily banned as the group was out some $2500 for their part in the incident that required repairs to the hall.
 1970s Paul McCartney sprouted Wings in 1972 when his band scheduled a small tour in a French town. The band included Macca, Denny Laine, Denny Seiwell, Henry McCullough and Paul’s wife, Linda. At least McCartney’s band didn’t have someone named Yoko in it.
 1970s The Everly Brothers went their separate ways in 1973 after a concert in Hollywood, California, went very poorly. Don’s performance was below par, which led to Phil smashing his guitar on stage and walking out. Don announced the break-up to the audience and stated that, “The Everly Brothers died ten years ago.” The split would last until 1983. Their last album before the split was Pass the Chicken and Listen.
 1970s Elvis Costello played the first gig with his new band, The Attractions, in 1977, less than a week after quitting his day job at Elizabeth Arden.
 1970s Gerry Rafferty topped the albums chart in the U.S. in 1978 with City to City. It contained the hits, Baker Street, Right Down the Line and Home and Dry. Rafferty first had success in Stealers Wheel when Stuck in the Middle With You hit gold in 1973. Sheryl Crow ripped off the Stealers Wheel song in 1994 when she released, All I Wanna Do.
 1970s 1979 saw the release of Neil Young’s feature film, Rust Never Sleeps. Songs included in the movie and on the soundtrack album were Sugar Mountain, I Am a Child, Comes a Time, After the Gold Rush, My My Hey Hey, The Needle and the Damage Done, Cinnamon Girl, Like a Hurricane and Tonight’s the Night. The film also featured The Beatles’, A Day in the Life and the Woodstock recording of Star Spangled Banner as performed by Jimi Hendrix. In 1987, Rolling Stone magazine would name Rust Never Sleeps one of the “greatest live performances of the last twenty years.”
 1970s Minnie Riperton died of cancer in 1979, four years after her number 1 hit, Lovin’ You. She had also been in Wonderlove in 1973, a backup group for Stevie Wonder.
 1980s In 1980, the man who had managed both The Beatles and The Rolling Stones began a 2 month jail sentence for falsifying income tax documents. Allen Klein was the culprit, and is also responsible for the absence of the Let It Be video, as well as CD releases of music by such artists as Chubby Checker, Bobby Rydell, The Rays, The Dovells and many others from the 1960s. Klein has control over ABKCO (Allen and Betty Klein Company) Music and Records.
 1980s Every Breath You Take by The Police was at the top of the singles chart in 1983 this week. It levelled off for an impressive, 8 weeks, and was from their final studio album, Synchronicity.
 1980s In 1985, Elton John signed with MCA Records for a five record deal worth $8 million. His next five albums were Ice On Fire, Leather Jackets, Live in Australia, Reg Strikes Back and Sleeping With the Past. These albums included the hits, Wrap Her Up, Nikita, Candle in the Wind (live), I Don’t Wanna Go On With You Like That, A Word in Spanish, Healing Hands, Sacrifice and Club at the End of the Street.
 1980s Live Aid took place at JFK Stadium in Philadelphia and at Wembley Stadium in London, in 1985. Bob Geldof spearheaded the effort by getting big name artists such as Paul McCartney, Phil Collins, The Who, David Bowie and Mick Jagger, Queen, Tina Turner, The Cars, Bryan Adams, Hall and Oates, Lionel Richie and Led Zeppelin with Phil Collins involved. Millions of dollars were raised for starving people in Ethiopia. The performances were shown live via satellite for 18 consecutive hours.
 1980s Major talent scout, John Hammond Sr., died in 1987. He brought Stevie Ray Vaughan, Bob Dylan, Aretha Franklin, Leonard Cohen and Bruce Springsteen to Columbia Records. Hammond also worked as a producer with such early greats as Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday, Benny Goodman and Count Basie.
 1980s In 1988, Cheap Trick had their first number 1 single with The Flame. The song doesn’t really do them justice however. Look for the 1996 box set, Sex America Cheap Trick. It contains some incredible, straight up rock and roll. In 1997, they changed record labels and released a self-titled CD. And it’s probably their best.
 1990s Bryan Adams’, (Everything I Do) I Do it for You began the first of sixteen consecutive record-breaking weeks at number 1 in 1991 in the U.K.
 1990s Bon Jovi was flying high in 1995, but suffered some disappointed when their concert booked for 100,000 fans at Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow was cancelled, due to the crisis in Chechnya. Cross Road – The Best of Bon Jovi was released the previous fall, which was then followed by These Days in June. This Ain’t a Love Song was climbing towards the top 10, so the band continued with some sold out New Jersey dates later in the month.
 1990s Elton John underwent surgery in 1999 to have a pacemaker implanted, something usually required only by people around the age of 70, one doctor commented. The 52 year old hoped to return to playing live dates in a couple of months. He had just released the Aida album.
 1990s Paul McCartney displayed 73 of his 600 paintings in 1999 at the Kunstforum Lyz gallery in the German town of Siegen, to rave reviews from art critics. One commented, “These are the works of someone who, in front of a blank canvas thinks and feels in paint. These pictures are challenging: They force the spectator to react.” McCartney had been painting for the past 16 years (since he turned 40), and included was one with the title “Elvish Me,” a self-portrait made in the likeness of Elvis Presley. That particular drawing was also shown in the liner notes to his album later in the year, Run Devil Run. Other familiar faces in the exhibit included John Lennon, David Bowie, Rolling Stone drummer Charlie Watts, Andy Warhol and Queen Elizabeth II. None of the paintings that were done between 1988 and 1995 were for sale, but many of them appeared in his Paul McCartney: Paintings book published the following year.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

July 8:
The parents of Jerry Vale (1932) and Steve Lawrence (1935) were Walking Proud on this day.
July 9:
They had to Send for the Man to deliver Ed Ames (1927), Mitch Mitchell (Jimi Hendrix Experience drummer, 1946) and Bon Scott (AC/DC, 1946).
July 10:
Hold On because Ian Whitcomb (1941), Arlo Guthrie (1947) and Rik Emmett (Triumph, 1953) want to celebrate their birthdays.
July 11:
The parents of Thurston Harris (1931), Tab Hunter (1931), Bonnie Pointer (1951), Richie Sambora (1959) and Suzanne Vega (1959) were not Living in Sin when these artists were born.
July 12:
Christine McVie (Fleetwood Mac, 1943), John Wetton (Asia, 1949) and Eric Carr (Kiss, 1950) had Love in Store when they were born.
July 13:
The parents of Roger (Jim) McGuinn (The Byrds, 1942) were Eight Miles High when he arrived.
July 14:
Woody Guthrie was Bound for Glory in 1912 when he was delivered.
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

July 10:
Promoter, John Hammond Sr., died at the age of 77 in 1987.
July 11:
Songwriter, George Gershwin, died of a brain tumour in 1937.
July 12:
Minnie Riperton died of cancer in 1979. Kenny Hollis, lead vocalist of Copperpenny, died in 2002 from a heart attack, several days after being hit by a pick-up truck.

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August
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26 - Sep 1

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28 - Nov 3

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