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The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
July 15 - 21
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 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1940s The multi-talented Petula Clark made her U.K. television debut in 1946, appearing on the Cabaret TV series at the age of 13. Clark began with guest spots on radio when she was only 9 and made her first film a year later. Put Your Shoes On Lucy was released as her 1949 debut single, but it was The Little Shoemaker that became her first U.K. hit in 1954. Clark would have to wait until 1965 to have a hit in America, when Downtown made it to number 1 for two weeks.
 1950s Gladys Knight had her first taste of success in 1952 when she won $2000 on Ted Mack’s Amateur Hour, a U.S. television show. She was 8 years old at the time and sang a tune appropriately titled, Too Young. Knight would make her first record only 5 years later with the help of an early line-up of The Pips.
 1950s Elvis Presley made a public appearance on one of the smallest stages imaginable – the back of a flatbed truck – outside a Memphis drugstore for its grand opening, in 1954. He was billed as a member of The Blue Moon Boys trio with Bill Black and Scotty Moore. The name was taken from a song they had recorded just 2 weeks previously, Blue Moon of Kentucky.
 1950s Billie Holiday died in a New York hospital in 1959 (while under arrest for heroin possession), from cirrhosis of the liver after years of alcohol abuse. She was only 43, but her voice sounded 30 years beyond that.
 1960s Six months after The Everly Brothers had jumped to Warner Brothers Records, their former label, Cadence Records, released the previously recorded song, When Will I Be Loved, as a single in 1960. Phil Everly wrote the song, and it would be the last Cadence track to crack the top 10. The duo’s success would continue on the Warner label into the mid-1960s.
 1960s Jack Bruce, Ginger Baker and Eric Clapton formed Cream in 1966. The group lasted 2 years, leaving behind some classic recordings in Sunshine of Your Love, Badge, Tales of Brave Ulysses, Spoonful, Strange Brew, Crossroads and White Room. Clapton does not have fond memories of the association, but fans feel that Slowhand was at his best at this point.
 1960s Bobby Fuller died under mysterious circumstances in 1966. He was found outside his mother’s apartment in his car with the windows rolled up but without any ignition keys. Although he had been beaten and doused with gasoline, the death was ruled a suicide or accidental death. Recent problems with the local mob were not considered by police. Is “cover up” spelled with, or without a hyphen?
 1960s Feature film, Yellow Submarine, debuted in 1968. The Beatles originally weren’t too keen about the picture, but after seeing elements of the cartoon, liked it enough to make a cameo at the end of the flick. Actors were hired to do the voices of The Beatles. Ringo Starr still gets asked today why he “pushed the button” that created all of the chaos in the animated picture.
 1960s Iron Butterfly’s second album, In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida, entered the albums chart in 1968. It was their second album, and contained the 17 minute title track that filled the second side of the LP. The album eventually made it to number 4 and has sold over four million copies in the U.S. alone. A special remastered edition, with psychedelic packaging, was released by Rhino Records in 1995. It also contains the 7” single version as well as a live version of the number 30 hit, In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida.
 1970s Smokey Robinson made his final appearance with The Miracles, in 1972. He went solo and had a number of hits throughout the 1970s and ’80s, including Cruisin’ and Being With You, while The Miracles finished their chart action in 1975 with Love Machine.
 1970s Jim Croce’s, Bad Bad Leroy Brown was the number 1 song this week in 1973. It was taken from the Life and Times album, which was only his second solo LP. Croce would die in a plane crash two months later, at the age of 30.
 1970s In 1976, Deep Purple announced at the end of a U.K. tour that they were splitting up. David Coverdale went solo, while Jon Lord and Ian Paice formed Paice, Ashton & Lord. Glenn Hughes returned to Trapeze and Tommy Bolin put together his own band, but would die before the end of the year. Deep Purple reformed 8 years later.
 1970s Linda Ronstadt joined The Rolling Stones at a 1977 concert in Tucson, Arizona, to perform Tumbling Dice. Ronstadt had recorded a cover of the song for her album, Simple Dreams. It was released as a single a couple of months earlier, but only reached the number 32 position in the U.S. The album itself had much better luck, staying at number 1 on the albums chart for 5 weeks. It was Ronstadt’s most successful album, containing three other singles, Blue Bayou, It’s So Easy and Poor Poor Pitiful Me. The follow-up, Living in the U.S.A., went number 1 for a week, on the strength of the number 7 hit, Ooh Baby Baby. The Rolling Stones were preparing for the live album, Love You Live, to be released in September, 1977.
 1980s Billy Joel held the top position of both the albums and singles charts this week in 1980. Glass Houses contained his first and biggest number 1 hit, It’s Still Rock ‘n’ Roll to Me. Three other singles from the album also did well. Sometimes a Fantasy, Don’t Ask Me Why and the top 10, You May Be Right, gave Joel another hit album, following The Stranger and 52nd Street.
 1980s The Delacorte Theater in New York’s Central Park saw the acting debut of Linda Ronstadt in 1980. She was cast as Mabel in The Pirates of Penzance, a part she played for about a year. The film version was done with Ronstadt in early 1982, as her Greatest Hits Volume 2 was released. Ronstadt also recorded her singing for the soundtrack to The Pirates of Penzance, which also starred Kevin Kline and Rex Smith.
 1980s Harry Chapin died in a car accident in 1981. He had success in the 1970s with Taxi, W-O-L-D and the number 1 hit, Cat’s in the Cradle.
 1980s It was Roy Orbison Day in Odessa, Texas, in 1981. Orbison was given the keys to the city, and performed for the crowd, the first time in Odessa in 15 years. His Golden Days album was on the U.K. charts, where he constantly toured and never lost his celebrity status.
 1980s In 1986, Carlos Santana celebrated his 39th birthday, and 20th anniversary in the music business, with a concert in San Francisco. Previous group members were assembled for the event, as 17 of them performed together on stage. Gregg Rolie and Neal Schon had left Santana’s group in the early 1970s to pursue a Journey of their own. Santana’s biggest success would arrive at the end of the century.
 1980s James Brown changed accommodations behind bars after $40000 in cash and cheques was discovered in his minimum security cell, in 1989. The Godfather of Soul had been given a six year sentence the previous December after several run-ins with the law, including illegal gun possession, resisting arrest, assault and leading the authorities on a number of car chases. His new home was at a medium security cell at the Stevenson Correctional Institute.
 1980s Tom Jones lost a paternity suit in 1989. He was ordered by “Judge Judy” Sheindlin to pay $200 a week in child support to 27 year old, Katherine Berkery, of New York. Further terms of the settlement were agreed upon a couple of months later. Jones had recently returned to the charts with Kiss, a song recorded with The Art of Noise.
 1990s Bobby Day died of cancer in 1990. His 1958 single, Rockin’ Robin, hit number 2 shortly after Thurston Harris’ recording of Day’s, Little Bitty Pretty One, made number 6 in the U.S.
 1990s Joni Mitchell joined Bryan Adams, The Scorpions, Cyndi Lauper, Van Morrison, The Band, Sinead O’Connor and other rock artists in helping Roger Waters stage a 1990 live performance of Pink Floyd’s, The Wall. The event was held on the west side of the Berlin wall and helped raise money for disaster relief. Over 200000 fans attended the concert, which was released on CD and in video form later in the year, and included Mitchell singing Goodbye Blue Sky.
 1990s The soundtrack to The Lion King, featuring songs by Elton John and Tim Rice, hit number 1 on the U.S. albums chart for the first of 10 weeks in 1994. The huge hit, Can You Feel the Love Tonight, was nominated for several Grammys, earning Elton the Best Male Pop Vocal Performance award.
 1990s Paul McCartney had an upcoming single bootlegged in 1999 when I Got Stung was taken from a BBC broadcast and distributed over the Internet. A couple of American radio stations started playing the track until they got their hands slapped by Capitol Records. The track was from the fall release of his Run Devil Run album, McCartney’s second release of old rock ‘n’ roll standards. David Gilmour and a couple other well-known rock musicians guest on several songs.
 1990s The Rolling Stones reported in 1999 an intake of over $337 million, from almost two years of touring. Shows on their Bridges to Babylon and No Security tours were in much more demand than recent albums, as The Stones seemed to be picking up where The Grateful Dead left off in 1995, after the loss of Jerry Garcia. The average nightly take on the 147 shows was over $2¼ million, as the band played to more than 5.6 million people, selling out all but 20 shows. The very successful tours were promoted by The Next Adventure, based in Toronto.
 2000s BMG, owner of RCA Records, made a deal to buy CDnow for $117 million in 2000. CDnow was formed in 1994 and grew to revenues of about $71 million in the first half of 1999. It was second only to Amazon.com in the on-line music retail business. Sony Corporation and Time-Warner had announced in the summer of 1999 that it would purchase the on-line music retailer and merge it with Columbia House, the music-club company run by the two giants. In March of 2000, however, the Sony/Time-Warner plans were scrapped, and by July, BMG had moved in.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

July 15:
It was a Long Long Time ago that Linda Ronstadt (1946), Trevor Horn (The Buggles / Yes, 1949), Alicia Bridges (1953) and Joe Satriani (1956) were brought into the world.
July 16:
Desmond Dekker (1941) and Stewart Copeland (The Police, 1952) were not born Israelites, but they do celebrate birthdays on this day.
July 17:
Gimme Some Lovin’ is what Spencer Davis (1937), Gale Garnett (1942), Mick Tucker (The Sweet, 1947), Nicolette Larson (1952) and Phoebe Snow (1952) cried for when they first showed their faces.
July 18:
There was plenty of Dancing in the Street when Jalacy “Screamin’ Jay” Hawkins (1929), Dion DiMucci (Dion & The Belmonts, 1939) and Martha Reeves (Martha & The Vandellas, 1941) were born. And about 30 years later Dion was born again!
July 19:
Vikki Carr (1941), Bernie Leadon (The Eagles, 1947), Brian May (Queen, 1947) and Allen Collins (Lynyrd Skynyrd, 1952) had to Take It Easy after they were delivered.
July 20:
Buddy Knox (1933), Kim Carnes (1945) and Carlos Santana (1947) spread More Love throughout the world after they made an entrance.
July 21:
It was a Wild World that Kay Starr (1922) and Cat Stevens (1947) came into on this day.
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

July 15:
Saxophonist, Bill Justis, died in Nashville in 1982. Bobby Day died of cancer in 1990. Ella Fitzgerald passed away at the age of 78, in 1996. Lead singer of Mike + The Mechanics and Sad Café, Paul Young, died of a heart attack in 2000 at the age of 53.
July 16:
Harry Chapin died in a car accident in 1981. John Panozzo, drummer and twin brother of Chuck of Styx, died of a gastrointestinal hemorrhage in 1996.
July 17:
Billie Holiday died in 1959 from cirrhosis of the liver. Jazz saxophone great, John Coltrane, died of liver cancer in 1967. Chas Chandler of The Animals, and one time manager of Jimi Hendrix, died in 1996 of an aortic aneurysm.
July 18:
Bobby Fuller died under mysterious circumstances of asphyxiation, in 1966. Nico died in 1988 of a cerebral hemorrhage.
July 21:
Long John Baldry died in 2005 from a chest infection.

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