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The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
July 22 - 28
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 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s Gene Vincent made his first appearance on national TV by performing on The Perry Como Show in 1956. Vincent had released Woman Love the previous month, but it was the B-side, Be-Bop-A-Lula, that eventually made the top 10. The hit was purchased from a fellow hospital patient when Vincent was recovering from leg injuries. A demo of the song made its way to Capitol Records as part of an Elvis sound-alike contest and a re-recorded version put Vincent into the rock ‘n’ roll history books.
 1960s Roy Orbison reached number 2 in 1960 with Only the Lonely, his first hit. The song was turned down by The Everly Brothers and Elvis, so Orbison decided to record the song himself. The floodgates were now open and over the next six years The Big O would have 22 top 40 hits in America. He was even bigger in the U.K., where he would tour constantly.
 1960s Stevie Wonder was no longer “Little” in 1964 when Hey Harmonica Man stalled at number 29 on the singles chart. It was his third, top 40 hit but he wouldn’t get back into the top 10 until his next single, Uptight (Everything’s Alright), made it in 1966.
 1960s Neil Young appeared with Crosby, Stills and Nash for the first time in 1969. They played The Fillmore East in New York. Young was initially asked to help out with live material only, but ended up joining the group on and off for the next 30 years. Stills and Young had previously played together in the supergroup, Buffalo Springfield, and would release the Long May You Run album in the mid-70s. The live release, Four Way Street, by CSN&Y was issued in 1971 and then expanded for CD in 1992.
 1970s Jimi Hendrix played in his home town of Seattle for the last time, in 1970. The concert was held at Sicks Stadium, during a constant downpour. To guard against electrocution, Jimi asked that the stage be covered with rubber. Hendrix reminded the audience during some on-stage banter that he hadn’t been pleased with the fact that he had to go England to make it in the music business, before he would be accepted back home. Two days later he reluctantly flew to Maui for the filming of Rainbow Bridge.
 1970s One of the best songs to ever come out of Canada peaked at number 21 on the Toronto singles chart this week, in 1972. (Make Me Do) Anything You Want was an amazing rock ballad from A Foot in Coldwater, a band assembled in Pickering, Ontario. After a second album was issued, the All Around Us LP was released, which was made up of a bunch of new tracks, as well as previously heard singles and an edited form of (Make Me Do) Anything You Want. The shorter track was put out again as a single, and this time it made the top 10. An awkward section of the guitar solo had been cut, and actually improved the song. It is one of the few instances where an altered version of a song was better than the original, full length recording.
 1970s Paul McCartney was arrested in Sweden for drug possession, in 1972. Two months later he faced the same charges at home in Scotland. And wouldn’t you know it, Macca was arrested again in March 1973 for growing marijuana. Let’s not even talk about the 1980 drug bust in Japan, where eight days in a cell with a guitar became the smallest Unplugged venue ever. McCartney, the other Beatles, and manager Brian Epstein, had previously added their signatures to a 1967 petition this same week, calling for the legalization of marijuana. I guess it didn’t work.
 1970s The Watkins Glen outdoor summer jam was held at the racetrack in New York in 1973. The Allman Brothers, The Grateful Dead and The Band all took part. The Live at Watkins Glen album wasn’t released by The Band until 1995. I Shall Be Released and Up On Cripple Creek were a couple of the highlights included on the CD.
 1970s The first single from Steve Miller’s, Fly Like An Eagle album, hit number 11 on the singles chart in 1976. Take the Money and Run was soon followed by Rock ’N Me and the album’s title track, where they reached number 1 and number 2, respectively. Doesn’t the intro to Rock ’N Me sound a bit like Free’s, All Right Now? Miller would rehash other popular licks on his next LP, Book of Dreams (in The Stake, Swingtown, etc.). These two albums were actually recorded at the same time, but Book of Dreams remained in the vaults until a 1977 release date.
 1970s Elton John finally had a number 1 single in the U.K. The year was 1976 and the song that did it was a duet with Kiki Dee, called Don’t Go Breaking My Heart. John would later re-record the song with RuPaul for his 1993, Duets album. This new version hit number 7 in the U.K., but stalled at number 92 in the U.S. Kiki Dee, however, was not to be forgotten as her duet for John’s album, True Love, had already made it to number 2 in the U.K. three months previously.
 1970s John Lennon finally received his U.S. Green Card in 1976. It came more than three years after he was ordered to leave by immigration officials.
 1970s Led Zeppelin drummer, John Bonham, was charged with assault after a 1977 concert at the Oakland Coliseum in California. Bonham and band manager Peter Grant had the help of their bodyguard in roughing up a security employee at the venue. The tour would eventually be cancelled after Robert Plant’s son died several days later.
 1970s Elvis Costello was arrested for busking outside a Columbia Records conference in 1977, held at a London hotel. He was signed to Stiff Records at the time, but Columbia soon picked up distribution of his releases for the next twelve years.
 1970s Jimmy Buffett became the toast of every town in 1977 when his Margaritaville hit peaked in the U.S. top 10. Its parent album, Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes was added to millions of record collections on the strength of the catchy hit and songs like Miss You So Badly and the title track. The Margaritaville identity has since been expanded into Margaritaville Stores and Cafés in the southern U.S., as well as establishments in Jamaica. Buffett’s next album, Son of a Son of a Sailor, kept fans satisfied with the juicy hit, Cheeseburger in Paradise.
 1970s Alice Cooper claimed that he was the victim of disco in 1979. Weren’t we all? Cooper had made recent anti-disco remarks, then saw his Indian art store in Arizona go up in flames. Over $200000 in goods, as well as several gold discs, were lost in the blaze, which was caused by a fire bomb. As if that wasn’t enough, Cooper was still recovering from treatment at a psychiatric hospital, which had inspired his excellent From the Inside album.
 1980s The Police, Squeeze and little-known band at the time, U2, played the Dalymount Festival in Dublin in 1980. Squeeze and The Police had been around for several years at this point, but U2 had only issued a couple of singles. Pulling Mussels From the Shell, off of Squeeze’s Argy Bargy album, had recently been on the charts, and is one of their more memorable tracks. Paul Carrack joined the band shortly after.
 1980s Willie Mae “Big Mama” Thornton died in 1984 at the age of 58. She had a number 1 R&B hit in 1953 with Hound Dog (for 7 weeks), the same song that helped put Elvis Presley on the map.
 1980s Peter Gabriel hit the top of the U.S. singles chart in 1986 with Sledgehammer. The song was from his huge So album, and would later be included on Shaking the Tree: 16 Golden Greats, a hits collection. Also gathered on the 1990 compilation were Games Without Frontiers, Solsbury Hill, Don’t Give Up, Red Rain, Shock the Monkey, Biko, Big Time and eight other tracks.
 1990s Bryan Adams made number 1 in the U.S. for the first of 7 weeks in 1991, two weeks after hitting the top in the U.K. (Everything I Do) I Do It for You, the biggest song of the year, was recorded for the Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves soundtrack. The huge hit was also available on his own album, Waking Up the Neighbours, which kept the hits coming.
 1990s UB40 visited the number 1 spot in 1993 for the first of 7 weeks in the U.S. with their recording of Can’t Help Falling in Love. Elvis of course had the first hit with the song, back in 1961-62. Corey Hart was next up with a top 30 hit in 1987, and was followed by a version from Hall and Oates for 1990’s, The Last Temptation of Elvis charity album. UB40 originally covered the song for the Honeymoon in Vegas soundtrack, but Bono’s version was chosen instead. In case you were wondering, a UB40 is not a boat or a submarine, it’s an abbreviation for Unemployment Benefits form 40.
 1990s Two teenagers drowned in the Boyne River during an REM concert in 1995. The band was in the middle of a run of bad luck on their world tour after drummer Bill Berry had surgery to remove a brain aneurysm and bassist Mike Mills had an intestinal tumour taken out, while lead singer Michael Stipe later had surgery to look after a hernia.
 1990s The Barenaked Ladies made number 3 on the U.S. albums chart in 1998 with Stunt. The first single, One Week, would hit number 1 that fall. Early copies of the album contained the bonus tracks, She’s On Time and Long Way Back Home, while a German version of the CD featured 7 different extra songs.
 1990s Phil Collins was married for the third time. The 48 year old drummer wed marketing consultant Orianne Cevey in Lausanne, Switzerland on July 24th, 1999. Collins had been dating the woman, 21 years younger than himself, for four years, before Elton John, Eric Clapton, Mark Knopfler, his three children (aged 9, 21 and 26), and other guests saw them get hitched. The one time Genesis member had just released the soundtrack to the animated feature, Tarzan, for which he created all of the music.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

July 22:
Chuck Jackson (1937), George Clinton (1940), Richard Davies (Supertramp, 1944) and Don Henley (1947) began Life in the Fast Lane.
July 23:
David Essex (1947) and Ian Thomas (1950) have come a Long, Long Way since they were born on this day.
July 24:
Barbara Love (The Friends of Distinction, 1941) felt like everything was Going in Circles in the delivery room.
July 25:
Manny Charlton of Nazareth flew in via stork on This Flight Tonight in 1941.
July 26:
Bobby Hebb (1941), Brenton Wood (1941), Dobie Gray (1942), Mick Jagger (1943) and Roger Taylor (Queen, 1949) came into a Sunny world.
July 27:
Bobbie Gentry (1944) and Maureen McGovern (1949), were wrapped in something Fancy upon their arrival.
July 28:
The doctor announced that everything was All Right Now soon after delivering Rick Wright (Pink Floyd, 1945), Jonathan Edwards (1946) and Simon Kirke (Free / Bad Company, 1949).
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

July 22:
Rock producer Gus Dudgeon died in a car accident in 2002. Eugene Record of The Chi-Lites died from cancer in 2005.
July 23:
Replacement Grateful Dead member, Keith Godchaux, died in a car accident in 1980.
July 25:
Willie Mae “Big Mama” Thornton died in 1984 at the age of 58. Erik Braunn of Iron Butterfly died of a heart attack in 2003. He was 52.
July 26:
Jimmy Keyes, a founding member of The Chords, died following an operation for an aneurysm in 1995. He was 65.
July 27:
Lynyrd Skynyrd bassist, Leon Wilkeson, died in his sleep in 2001 at the age of 49.

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