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26 - Mar 3

March
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25 - 31

April
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May
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The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
September 9 - 15
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 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s Little Richard entered a New Orleans studio in 1955 to begin two days of recording. Out of the sessions came Tutti Frutti, but in a cleaner version, thanks to lyricist Dorothy LaBostrie. Richard coined the phrase, “a-wop-bop-a-loo-bop-a-lop-bam-boom,” while working as a dishwasher to support his family. The official recording session was going nowhere and so everyone took a break at a nearby inn. Richard used the restaurant piano to play his raucous version of an unknown song, Tutti Frutti. After it was cleaned up and put down onto tape, the song managed to make it into the top 20 early the following year.
 1950s Elvis appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show for the first time in 1956 as over 54 million people watched. Elvis performed Don’t Be Cruel, Love Me Tender, Ready Teddy and Hound Dog. Charles Laughton was taking Sullivan’s place after a recent car accident kept the regular host in bed. The next day, record stores all over the country were flooded with requests for Love Me Tender, even though its planned release date was weeks away.
 1960s The Four Seasons had their first number 1 hit in 1962 this week. Sherry led the way for another eleven top 10 hits before the end of the decade. Two more were added in the mid-1970s. December 1963, Rag Doll, Walk Like a Man, Big Girls Don’t Cry and Sherry all hit number 1. A special, enhanced version of Big Girls Don’t Cry is available on Curb Records’ 1988 release, The Four Seasons Hits Digitally Enhanced, as is the extended version of December 1963, which re-entered the top 20 in 1994.
 1960s The first significant rock bootleg album appeared in Los Angeles record stores in 1963. The honour went to Bob Dylan and the pirated released was titled, Great White Wonder. And 35 years later, Dylan fans could replace another famous bootleg, Live At the Royal Albert Hall with a legitimate version. The live concert contains the “Judas” accusation from a fan, to which Dylan replies, “I don’t believe you!”
 1960s “Madness!! Folk and Roll Musicians-Singers for acting roles in new TV series. Running parts for four insane boys, age 17 to 21.” That was part of the ad placed in two American newspapers in 1965, looking for talented individuals to play The Monkees. Both Stephen Stills and Danny Hutton (future Three Dog Night leader) were turned down. Of course, Davy Jones, Mike Nesmith, Mickey Dolenz and Peter Tork were the four chosen to star in the TV series that was modelled after the A Hard Day’s Night movie from 1964.
 1960s The Archies cartoon show first aired in 1968 on the CBS television network. The Bang-Shang-A-Lang single was recorded around the same time. It went to number 22 later in the year. The recording group had contributions from Ron Dante, Andy Kim, Jeff Barry and others. Rock mogul, Don Kirshner (who also brought us The Monkees), was put in charge of the studio group, while Barry looked after the songwriting and Dante the lead vocals. Sugar, Sugar was of course The Archies’ biggest hit.
 1960s John Lennon’s back-up band for the Rock ‘n’ Roll Revival Concert this week in 1969 was put together so late that they had to rehearse on the plane from England. Band members added were Eric Clapton, Klaus Voorman (bass player from Manfred Mann, and an old Beatle buddy) and drummer Alan White (later with Yes). Also making an appearance at the concert were Chuck Berry, Gene Vincent, Bo Diddley, The Doors and Alice Cooper. Lennon later released his performance as the Live Peace in Toronto 1969 album.
 1960s Santana’s first album entered the U.S. charts in 1969. It contained the popular tracks, Evil Ways, Jingo and Soul Sacrifice. The album hit number 4 two months later, and stayed on the charts for over 2 years.
 1970s In 1970 this week, Bob Dylan joined Joan Baez, Pete Seeger and Arlo Guthrie at the Woody Guthrie Memorial Concert held at the Hollywood Bowl. Baez had just released One Day at a Time, but it would be her Blessed Are album from the following year that would give her the smash single of The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down, a cover of the song by The Band.
 1970s Gary Glitter first started to see the money roll in when Rock and Roll Part 2 peaked at number 7 in the U.S. in 1972. The song has since been included on countless compilations, especially those aimed at sports fans. Rock and Roll Part 1 is very similar to Part 2 except that Part 1 features vocals throughout the song.
 1970s The Rolling Stones were in the middle of a scandal in 1973, when the BBC announced that it was banning Star Star from airplay. The song from the newly released, Goat’s Head Soup album, contained profanity in the chorus. The song also mentioned the name of Steve McQueen, but he wasn’t bothered by all the fuss. Soup also contained the hits, Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker) and Angie.
 1970s Pink Floyd released their follow-up to The Dark Side of the Moon in 1975. Wish You Were Here consisted of only five tracks, and one of them wasn’t even sung by a member of the band. Have a Cigar featured Roy Harper on vocals because neither Roger Waters nor David Gilmour could reach the high notes. The album is a showcase for the excellent guitaring of Gilmour.
 1970s ABBA began its first North American tour in 1979, more than 5 years after first hitting the top 10. The series of 18 dates began and ended in Canada. Their biggest hits in the U.S. were Waterloo, Dancing Queen, Take a Chance On Me and The Winner Takes It All.
 1970s Bob Dylan released Slow Train Coming, an album of religious songs, in 1979. It included the Grammy Award winning single, Gotta Serve Somebody, as well as songs like Gonna Change My Way of Thinking, When You Gonna Wake Up, When He Returns and Do Right to Me Baby (Do Unto Others). It took him many years to gain fans back after this release.
 1980s Chicago had the number 1 song in 1982 this week, with Hard to Say I’m Sorry. It was their second song, after If You Leave Me Now, to make it to the top, and would go on to be their biggest single. The group had changed record companies after their last studio album bombed, going “aluminum, maybe plywood,” as one member of the band described it. Most of their previous albums had been certified gold. Hard to Say I’m Sorry put them back onto the charts after more than two years, and it had been almost five years since they had a top 10 hit. Chicago would continue with their renewed success for the rest of the 1980s, with songs like Hard Habit to Break, Will You Still Love Me? and You’re Not Alone.
 1980s La Bamba was finishing its third week at the top of the U.S. singles chart in 1987, while the album it came from hit number 1 this week. Los Lobos performed the song, along with seven others (Donna, Come On Let’s Go and Good Night included), for the La Bamba soundtrack. Also appearing on the album release were Bo Diddley (Who Do You Love, produced by Willie Dixon), Brian Setzer (Summertime Blues) and Marshall Crenshaw (Crying, Waiting, Hoping). Come On Let’s Go was also a top 40 hit from the soundtrack. The movie starred Lou Diamond Phillips as Ritchie Valens. Valens died in a plane crash along with Buddy Holly and The Big Bopper in February, 1959.
 1980s Guns N’ Roses hit it big in 1988 with, Sweet Child O’ Mine. It was number 1 and was taken from the album, Appetite for Destruction. The song was written for Rose’s girlfriend, Erin Everly. Yes, she is the daughter of Don Everly, of The Everly Brothers. Axl and Erin were married briefly in 1990. Welcome to the Jungle and Paradise City were also top 10 hits taken from Appetite. The former song is popular at hockey games, especially when fights break out.
 1990s Hall and Oates played a sold out show in Mexico in 1991. The concert at the Mexico National Auditorium was in support of what was probably their finest album, Change of Season, from the previous fall. The album’s hit single, So Close, which was produced by Danny Kortchmar and Jon Bon Jovi, made it to number 11 in the U.S. A second, “unplugged” version of So Close was also included on the album.
 1990s Cyndi Lauper won an Emmy award in 1995 for a guest appearance on the Mad About You sitcom. She won for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series, a few weeks after her first hits package, Twelve Deadly Cyns… and Then Some, was released. A new track, Hey Now (Girls Just Want to Have Fun), was issued as a single.
 1990s Graham Nash rejoined The Hollies in 1995 to complete recording of the song, Peggy Sue Got Married. The song was begun by Buddy Holly back in 1958, and now The Hollies were adding to it. Along with 11 other songs, Peggy Sue Got Married became part of the Holly tribute album, Not Fade Away.
 1990s David Bowie released a new single in 1996 that was available only through the Internet. The track, Telling Lies, could be downloaded from Bowie’s own web site, and was promoted as a song that would not appear on CD, cassette or on radio. It was included on his Earthling album the following year. Telling Lies indeed.
 1990s Billy Joel phoned radio station WNEW 102.7 in New York in 1999, on the first day of its new talk-radio format. The station had been one of the first progressive rock FM stations back in the 1970s but finally gave up to the new format it promoted as “talk you can’t ignore.” Joel reminisced on the air with disk jockey Ralph Tortora about the impact the station had on The Piano Man’s life. WNEW’s rock and roll ended with Thank You from Led Zeppelin, The Kinks’, Better Days and The End by The Beatles, which faded into the final chord of A Day in the Life, as it appears on Anthology 3. It’s unfortunate that radio everywhere has abandoned the classic format, which played album tracks, like Joel’s, Captain Jack, Somewhere Along the Line and You’re My Home, and not just repetitive top 40 that the AM band used to exclusively deliver.
 2000s In the wake of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11th, 2001, a list of over 150 songs to be banned from U.S. radio was produced. Not to be played were songs like Daniel and Bennie & The Jets by Elton John, Get Together by The Youngbloods and The Surfaris’, Wipeout because they were so offensive. Also on the list was every song by Rage Against the Machine, a rap-metal band targeting corporate America in many of its songs.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

September 9:
The doctor had to Try a Little Tenderness when bringing Otis Redding into the world in 1941. Also having Sweet Dreams on this day were Doug Ingle (Iron Butterfly, 1946), Billy Preston (1946) and Dave Stewart (The Eurythmics, 1952).
September 10:
There was lots to Celebrate when Danny Hutton (Three Dog Night, 1942), José Feliciano (1945) and Joe Perry (Aerosmith, 1950) arrived.
September 11:
Tommy Shaw (Styx / Damn Yankees, 1953) and Harry Connick Jr. (1967) were born a couple of Renegades.
September 12:
Maria Muldaur (1943), Barry White (1944), Gerry Beckley (America, 1952) and Neil Peart (Rush, 1952) were not born at Midnight at the Oasis.
September 13:
David Clayton-Thomas (Blood, Sweat & Tears) felt like he was on a Spinning Wheel when he arrived in a disoriented state in 1941. Peter Cetera (Chicago, 1944) became a product of the Glory of Love on this day, as did Ringo’s son, Zak Starkey (1965).
September 14:
Pete Agnew (Nazareth, 1946) and Paul Kossoff (1950) broke Free of their umbilical cords.
September 15:
Jimmy Gilmer (1940) and Rich Wamil (Copperpenny, 1950) were delivered next door to a Sugar Shack
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

September 9:
Bill Monroe passed away in 1996 just days short of his 85th birthday.
September 11:
Peter Tosh was assassinated in Kingston, Jamaica, by three gunmen in 1987.
September 12:
Johnny Cash died in 2003 of complications from diabetes.
September 14:
Perez Prado passed away in 1989 at the age of 72.
September 15:
Johnny Ramone died of prostate cancer in 2004 at the age of 55.

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