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25 - 31

April
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May
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27 - Jun 2

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The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
October 7 - 13
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 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s Johnnie Ray revived Just Walkin’ in the Rain in 1956 and turned it into a huge hit. The song was originally recorded in 1953 by The Prisonaires, an R&B group made up of five inmates from the Tennessee State Penitentiary. The members were transported under guard to Sam Phillips’ Sun Studios for the recording session.
 1950s Jerry Lee Lewis recorded his biggest hit, Great Balls of Fire, in 1957. The song was his follow-up to the six million seller, Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On.
 1950s Eddie Cochran recorded the rocker, C’mon Everybody in 1958. It would be his last top 40 hit. Summertime Blues was currently on the American charts and became his best known song. Artists like Blue Cheer and The Who have also had success with Cochran’s rock anthem.
 1950s As To Know Him is to Love Him was climbing the charts on its way to number 1 in 1958, Billboard Magazine featured The Teddy Bears in an article. An interview with member and song arranger, Phil Spector, netted the revelation that Spector was studying to become a court reporter. Unfortunately, it took 45 years to realize this dream, when Spector had to report to court on murder charges.
 1950s Move over Johnny Mathis. In 1959, Bobby Darin became the youngest performer to headline at the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas. Darin had released his biggest album that year, That’s All, which included the smash hits, Mack the Knife and Beyond the Sea. He would receive two Grammys for his efforts: Record of the Year and Best New Artist.
 1960s Frank Ifield preceded the official British Invasion when he took the Jimmy Dorsey track, I Remember You, to number 5 in 1962. The original version was a hit twenty years before, and was from the film, The Fleet’s In. Ifield became the first artist in the U.K. to have three consecutive number 1 hits, with I Remember You, Love Sick Blues and a cover of The Wayward Wind.
 1960s Johnny Kidd was killed in 1966 in a car crash in Manchester, England, at the age of 26. Kidd and his band, The Pirates, first made the U.K. charts in 1959, with Please Don’t Touch, and again the following year with You Got What It Takes, Restless and the number 1 song, Shakin’ All Over. By the time the official British Invasion hit, Johnny Kidd and The Pirates had faded with Kidd finally leaving the group in 1966. But before Kidd died, in 1965, The Guess Who / Chad Allan and The Expressions would take their version of Shakin’ All Over into the top 40 in the U.S. And many years later, Billy Idol recorded a great live version of the track. You can find it on the Collectors page.
 1960s Never My Love rose to its peak position of number 2 in the U.S. in 1967. The Association’s recording was the first version to become a hit. It was followed by covers from The 5th Dimension in 1971 and Blue Swede in 1974. The tune was listed as the second most played song in the 20th century, by the BMI music publishing group, with over 7 million plays. You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling was tops with over 8 million plays of versions by The Righteous Brothers, Hall and Oates, Dionne Warwick and others. The Beatles’, Yesterday was third, followed by Stand By Me (Ben E. King) and Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You (Frankie Valli, The Lettermen).
 1960s The last album recorded by The Beatles, Abbey Road, entered the U.K. charts this week in 1969 at number 1. It is their best selling album, with fans buying over 11 million copies in the U.S. alone. The first side of the record was compiled in the traditional way, to keep John Lennon happy, while side two featured a mini rock-opera with song snippets combined into a long arrangement. The idea was developed by Paul McCartney and George Martin, who wanted the entire album done like that. Her Majesty was originally placed between Sun King and Polythene Pam, but upon playback, Sir Paul requested that it be removed. So engineer, John Kurlander, chopped out the appropriate piece and tacked it on at the end of the reel (engineers were instructed to never throw anything away). Before the next session a demo was made from the tape, with Her Majesty unknowingly stuck on the end, and when the group heard it, they decided to leave it there. Her Majesty became the first “hidden’’ track on an album. This practice is very popular on the CD format of today.
 1970s Gene Vincent died of a perforated ulcer in 1971. He played his classic hit, Be-Bop-A-Lula in the movie, The Girl Can’t Help It. Also appearing in the 1956 feature film were Fats Domino, The Platters, Little Richard, Duane Eddy and other artists.
 1970s Elvis Presley divorced Priscilla in 1973 after less than six and a half years of marriage and twelve years together. They met when she was 14 while Elvis was stationed in Germany. Daughter, Lisa Marie was 5½ years old at the time of the permanent break-up, and The King’s current single was the forgettable, Raised On Rock.
 1970s Olivia Newton-John topped the U.S. albums chart for the first time in 1974. If You Love Me, Let Me Know contained the hit title track as well as her first number 1 single, I Honestly Love You. It was around this time that Newton-John moved from country flavoured songs into pop music. She kept the hits coming into the mid-1980s, sharing several with John Travolta, Andy Gibb, ELO and Cliff Richard.
 1970s The first Saturday Night Live aired this week in 1975, with Dan Aykroyd, John Belushi, Chevy Chase and Gilda Radner. Aykroyd and Belushi would later form The Blues Brothers, and many years after Belushi’s death, brother Jim, Aykroyd and John Goodman would pick up where they left off playing live shows. Unfortunately, Jim was unable to appear in the movie, Blues Brothers 2000, with Aykroyd and Goodman.
 1970s Neil Young went under the knife in 1975 to have some throat surgery. An unwanted growth was removed from his vocal chords a few weeks before the release of his Zuma album. The LP contained the classic Young track, Cortez the Killer, which would set the tone for Like a Hurricane recorded two years later.
 1970s Steve Hackett announced that he was leaving Genesis in 1977 for a solo career. He had been experiencing the George Harrison blues, not being allowed enough input within the band. In fact, Hackett had already released one solo album, Voyage of the Acolyte, in 1975, between The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway and A Trick of the Tail. His first album after the permanent split was Please Don’t Touch.
 1970s Steven Tyler and Joe Perry were injured in 1978 in Philadelphia when a fan threw a cherry bomb on stage. Their recording of The Beatles’, Come Together, was climbing the charts at the time, which came about six months after the release of their successful, Draw the Line album. They would have to wait almost 10 years for their next hit.
 1970s Fleetwood Mac received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1979. It was also declared Fleetwood Mac Day in Los Angeles. The group had released the Tusk album, and its title track featuring the USC Trojan Marching Band (recorded live at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles), was making its way into the top 10. Other singles from the double album eventually included Sara, Not That Funny, Think About Me and Sisters of the Moon. The album made it to number 1 in the U.S., but peaked at number 4 in the U.K.
 1980s It wasn’t quite what director Harold Ramis requested, but it was good enough to hit number 7 in 1980. I’m Alright was the second top 10 solo hit for Kenny Loggins, following Whenever I Call You Friend from 1978. Ramis actually wanted Pink Floyd to contribute to his new movie, Caddyshack, starring Bill Murray, Chevy Chase, Ted Knight and Rodney Dangerfield. Instead, we heard Loggins begin a successful run of songs written for movie soundtracks. He would later add Footloose, Danger Zone (Top Gun), Meet Me Half Way (Over the Top) and Nobody’s Fool (Caddyshack II) to his list of soundtrack hits.
 1980s Billy Joel hit number 57 in the U.K. in 1981 with his live album, Songs in the Attic. It was the very first live LP recorded digitally, and eventually made it to number 8 in the U.S. All of the songs were taken from albums released before his smash, The Stranger. Songs in the Attic is probably his best album, and contains such nuggets as Streetlife Serenader, Say Goodbye to Hollywood, Captain Jack and I’ve Loved These Days.
 1980s You Know What to Do by Carly Simon stalled at number 83 in the U.S. in 1983. It was taken from the very underrated album, Hello Big Man. Simon’s last top 10 hit had been Jesse from 1980, and she would have to wait until 1987 to return to the top 20, with Coming Around Again, after changing record labels. If you can find Hello Big Man, it’s worth picking up.
 1980s Love Bites by Def Leppard was number 1 in 1988. The song was the fourth of six songs from the Hysteria album to enter the top 20, and was their only number 1. Other singles included Animal, Hysteria, Pour Some Sugar On Me, Armageddon It and Rocket.
 1990s James Taylor played to a soldout house in 1994, at the Civic Center in Pensacola, Florida, just days after two of his albums from the 1980s, That’s Why I’m Here and Never Die Young, were both certified platinum. Taylor was promoting his live album, James Taylor Live, released the previous year. It was available in several formats, first as a double CD package, then as a condensed single album and then the single CD version was spread over two discs with CD Extra (multimedia) enhancements added.
 1990s Peter Frampton released the long awaited follow-up to his record-setting live album, when Frampton Comes Alive II was issued in 1995. It was a solid effort, built on songs like Lying, Waiting for Your Love, I’m In You, Can’t Take That Away, More Ways Than One and Off the Hook. Frampton Comes Alive II was far better than his lacklustre live album five years later, Live in Detroit.
 1990s Elton John continued his public war of words with Keith Richards in 1997, when he said that Richards is “so pathetic, poor thing. It’s like a monkey with arthritis, trying to go on stage and look young.” This was the reply to The Rolling Stone’s comment a few weeks earlier that Elton was reduced to “writing songs for dead blondes,” after the incredible success of Candle in the Wind 1997. It was the third time the song had been released as a single in the U.K.
 1990s It began back in 1917 when Charlie Chaplin purchased the lot and turned it into a movie studio the following year. Years later, in 1966 to be exact, Herb Alpert and Jerry Moss bought the site and turned it into their A&M Records (A = Alpert and M = Moss) headquarters and recording studios. But in 1999 this week, after the Universal Music Group took over ownership, the A&M Studios were closed down. A&M artists like Peter Frampton, The Carpenters, Chuck Mangione, The Police and Styx had recorded there, but so did outside groups like Yes, Chicago and Black Sabbath.
 1990s Sony Music released one of the most ambitious collections in music history in 1999 when Soundtrack for a Century was made available. The 26 CD set spanned 100 years of music, and contained 547 songs, by such diverse artists as Aerosmith, Bob Dylan, Ethel Merman, Johnny Horton, Celine Dion, Will Smith, The Dixie Chicks, Al Jolson, Louis Armstrong, Robert Johnson, Billie Holiday, Tony Bennett, Simon and Garfunkel and many, many others. Sony Music calls it “The Greatest Story Ever Heard.” Separate, double CD sets taken from the collection were also made available.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

October 7:
Al Martino (1927), Kevin Godley (10cc, 1945) and John Cougar Mellencamp (1951) had their first Cry.
October 8:
Hamish Stuart (Average White Band) started some Soul Searching in 1949.
October 9:
John Winston Lennon (1940), John Entwistle (The Who, 1944), Jackson Browne (1948) and Sean Ono Lennon (1975) first experienced Instant Karma.
October 10:
Midge Ure (1953) and David Lee Roth (1955) were born into Damn Good families.
October 11:
When it came to the deliveries of Dottie West (1932) and Daryl Hall (1948), the doctor Did It in a Minute.
October 12:
Sam Moore (Sam & Dave, 1935) and Luciano Pavarotti (1935) were each born a Soul Man.
October 13:
Paul Simon (1941), Sammy Hagar (1947) and John Ford Coley (1948) arrived Late in the Evening.
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

October 7:
Johnny Kidd died in a car accident in 1966.
October 8:
Barrie Wilson of Procol Harum died in 1990 after months in a coma. He was only 43.
October 11:
Edith Piaf died in 1963 at the age of 47. Bruce Palmer (Buffalo Springfield) died of a heart attack in 2004. He was 58.
October 12:
Gene Vincent died in 1971 from an ulcer hemorrhage. John Denver died in a plane crash in 1997.
October 13:
Shirley Brickley of The Orlons was shot to death in 1977. She was 32.

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