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The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
October 14 - 20
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 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s Early in his career, Buddy Holly and partner, Bob Montgomery opened for Bill Haley and His Comets as Buddy and Bob, at a 1955 concert promoted by radio station KDAV. The next day they opened for Elvis Presley at the Lubbock Cotton Club.
 1960s The Zombies began a U.K. tour in 1964, with The Isley Brothers, Dionne Warwick and The Searchers in tow. Their biggest hit, She’s Not There, had just appeared in the U.S. top 40, and would go on to make number 2 a couple months later. Several other hits followed, including Time of the Season in 1969, coming after the group had already split up.
 1960s Grace Slick joined Jefferson Airplane this week in 1966, replacing new mother, Signe Toly Anderson. Slick left local band, Great Society, and brought two of their songs with her: White Rabbit and Somebody to Love.
 1960s Jeff Beck left The Yardbirds in 1966 while the group was touring the U.S. by bus. He developed acute tonsillitis and eventually ended up forming a new band with Rod Stewart and Ronnie Wood, called The Jeff Beck Group.
 1960s Joan Baez began a ten day stay in prison in 1966 after being arrested for protesting compulsory military training for U.S. citizens. Over 100 demonstrators joined her in the California jail. Baez was one of Bob Dylan’s earliest supporters, back in 1962.
 1960s The Four Tops had the number 1 song this week in 1966, with Reach Out I’ll Be There. It was their last trip to the top, but they did continue having hits into the 1980s. Their best songs included I Can’t Help Myself, Baby I Need Your Loving, It’s the Same Old Song, Standing in the Shadows of Love, Bernadette, Ain’t No Woman Like the One I Got and When She Was My Girl. Great vocals! They were probably the most underrated Motown act.
 1960s The movie, How I Won the War, with John Lennon, premiered in London in 1967. It was during filming in Germany that Lennon wrote Strawberry Fields Forever. All four Fabs attended the showing of the movie directed by A Hard Day’s Night director, Richard Lester. Lennon played Private Gripweed during the second World War.
 1960s The Small Faces had a guest guitarist appear with them at a 1968 gig. Steve Marriott had invited The Herd’s lead guitar player to join The Small Faces when they were playing in London. There wouldn’t be too many more concert appearances for the group with Marriott as he and guest Peter Frampton would soon form Humble Pie.
 1960s In 1969, a week after releasing Arthur or The Decline and Fall of the British Empire, The Kinks began their first U.S. tour in four years. They appeared at The Fillmore East, opening for Spirit after delays in getting their permits. Victoria was taken from the album as a single, but it stalled at number 62 in the U.S.
 1960s John Lennon released the embarrassing, The Wedding Album, with Yoko Ono in 1969. It was his third album without The Beatles in the past 12 months. The album came with a poster, and a picture of wedding cake in a bag. It’s hard to say which was better, the record or the extra items.
 1960s Leonard Chess, founder of Chess Records, died in 1969. Leonard and brother Phil formed their namely label in 1950 after taking over Aristocrat Records. Muddy Waters was one of the first to record on Chess, and was followed by other blues greats like Howlin’ Wolf, Buddy Guy, Elmore James and of course Willie Dixon. Leonard referred to Dixon as his own right arm, performing, arranging, producing and writing many of the best Chess tracks. R&B acts like The Moonglows, Chuck Berry, The Dells and Etta James also recorded for Chess.
 1960s Rod Stewart joined The Small Faces in 1969, when it was renamed The Faces. They would hit it big in 1971 with (I Know) I’m Losing You, and a year later with Stay With Me. Steve Marriott was leaving the group and so Ron Wood replaced him, bringing along Stewart.
 1970s Rick Nelson played the seventh Annual Rock ‘n’ Roll Revival show in New York in 1971. The crowd booed him when all the oldies weren’t played, as Nelson preferred to promote his latest material. The reaction to his performance inspired Nelson to write his last top 40 hit, Garden Party. It went to number 6 in 1972, with lyrics that included the lines, “If you gotta play at Garden Parties, I wish you a lot of luck, But if memories were all I sang, I’d rather drive a truck.”
 1970s Creedence Clearwater Revival announced in 1972 that the group was splitting up. After the failure of their most recent album, Mardi Gras, John Fogerty was ready for a solo career. The other members of the group had wanted in on the songwriting and production on what would be their final album, but were not in the same league as Fogerty. He would release his Blue Ridge Rangers LP the following year.
 1970s The Rolling Stones had the number 1 song in 1973 in the U.S. with Angie. The song was named after David Bowie’s wife at the time, and was from the Goat’s Head Soup album. It only made it to number 5 in the U.K. Their last top hit at home was Honky Tonk Women from 1969.
 1970s The Sweet’s most recognizable hit, Ballroom Blitz, peaked at number 5 in the U.S. in 1975, over two years after it had been a hit in the U.K. Little Willy had opened international doors in 1973 after several local hits, including Blockbuster, Wig-Wam Bam and Hell Raiser. Following closely on the heels of Ballroom Blitz came Teenage Rampage, The Six Teens, Fox On the Run and Action, and in 1978, Love is Like Oxygen.
 1970s Tina Turner breathed a major sigh of relief in 1976 when she officially ended her professional attachment to Ike Turner. She had left her marriage behind a few months before, and had already released the Acid Queen solo album exactly one year before. The album contained cover versions of such classics as Whole Lotta Love, Under My Thumb, Let’s Spend the Night Together and I’ve Been Loving You Too Long.
 1970s Three members of the band, Lynyrd Skynyrd (named after their teacher, Leonard Skinner), were killed on October 20th, 1977, in a fiery plane crash. Out of respect, their 1977 album, Street Survivors, was pulled from stores and re-released without the flames on the album cover that were smothering the band. Recently, the remastered CD version of the Street Survivors album used the original cover art work, flames and all.
 1980s America returned to the U.S. top 10 for one last time when You Can Do Magic peaked at number 8 in 1982. The song was from their third album for Capitol Records, View From the Ground, after a number of successful releases for Warner Brothers, most of which began with the letter ‘H’ (Homecoming, Hat Trick, Holiday, Hearts, Hideaway, Harbour and History – America’s Greatest Hits). View From the Ground was a very solid album, and had songwriting contributions from Argent’s Russ Ballard, Canadian Ian Thomas and TV actor Billy Mumy (Will Robinson on Lost in Space), as well as vocals from Carl Wilson, Timothy B. Schmit and Christopher Cross.
 1980s Chuck Berry celebrated his 60th birthday a few days early with an all-star concert in 1986. Guest stars included Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, Linda Ronstadt and Julian Lennon. Berry’s recordings in the early days of rock and roll led John Lennon to once say that, “If you ever tried to give rock ‘n’ roll another name, you might call it Chuck Berry.”
 1980s Roy Orbison had his name added to the West Texas Walk of Fame in 1989. The Big O had died the previous December.
 1990s Chris Isaak got a big break in 1990 when an Atlanta, Georgia, radio station began playing Wicked Game in heavy rotation. The programme director at the station had seen the movie, Wild at Heart, which featured an instrumental version of Wicked Game, and was hooked by the melody. Other radio stations also picked up the song and it became a top 10 hit in 1991. A similar turn of events occurred in 1999 when a remix of Baby Did a Bad Bad Thing was included in Stanley Kubrick’s, Eyes Wide Shut movie. The original version of the song had been released on Isaak’s Forever Blue LP back in 1995.
 1990s Steppenwolf, had their classic hit Born to Be Wild re-enter the top 10 in Holland in 1990 this week. This isn’t that surprising considering the number of movies and commercials that have featured the song.
 1990s Robbie Robertson released his second solo album, Storyville, in 1991. Since then, he has been working on movie soundtracks (Jimmy Hollywood, Casino, Phenomenon, etc.), as well as issuing two albums of Native American music. Highlights of his last two releases include the tracks, Ghost Dance and Unbound.
 1990s “Bobfest’’ was held in 1992. That was the name given to “The Bob Dylan 30th Anniversary Celebration” concert, by participant, Neil Young. He contributed All Along the Watchtower and Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues at the event held at Madison Square Gardens in New York, as a tribute to Dylan. Also appearing were Tom Petty, George Harrison, Eric Clapton, Roger McGuinn and others. Dylan performed It’s Alright Ma and Girl of the North Country.
 1990s In 1993, Peter Gabriel had his visual commercial for the song, Sledgehammer, listed by Rolling Stone Magazine as the number 1 video in history. It won nine awards from MTV, the most by any music video.
 2000s Dion and The Belmonts were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2000. They were joined by fellow inductees, The Mamas and The Papas, Three Dog Night, Ben E. King, The Four Seasons, The Kingston Trio, Frankie Lymon and The Teenagers, The Soul Stirrers, The Drifters, The Skylarks, The Dixie Hummingbirds, The Flamingos, and for some strange reason, The Bangles. After the ceremony, The Belmonts performed their two biggest hits, Tell Me Why and Come On Little Angel.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

October 14:
Cliff Richard came into the world Suddenly, in 1940. So did Justin Hayward (The Moody Blues), but in 1946.
October 15:
It seems like Only Yesterday that Barry McGuire (1935), Marv Johnson (1938), Richard Carpenter (1946) and Chris DeBurgh (1948) were born.
October 16:
Bert Kaempfert (1923), Nico (1938), Fred Turner (BTO, 1943) and Bob Weir (The Grateful Dead, 1947) dropped in at Three O’Clock in the Morning.
October 17:
There was some turvy and Topsy II when Cozy Cole (1909), Jim Seals (Seals & Crofts, 1941), Gary Puckett (1942) and Ziggy Marley (1968) arrived.
October 18:
It was a School Day when Chuck Berry (1926), Laura Nyro (1947) and Gary Richrath (REO Speedwagon, 1949) were born.
October 19:
George Cates (1911), George McCrae (1944), Jeannie C. Riley (1945) and Jennifer Holliday (1960) knew what it was like to Rock Your Baby when they arrived.
October 20:
Tom Petty’s mother was screaming at the doctor, “You Don’t Know How It Feels,” when Tom was delivered in 1953. Mark King, of Level 42, began his Lessons in Love on the same day, but in 1958.
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

October 14:
Bing Crosby died in 1977 of a heart attack.
October 16:
Leonard Chess (founder of Chess Records) died at the age of 52 in 1969. Ella Mae Morse died of respiratory failure in 1999. Doug Bennett of Doug and the Slugs died in 2004 after being in a coma for a week.
October 17:
“Tennessee” Ernie Ford died of liver disease in 1991.
October 18:
Julie London died in 2000 of respiratory arrest, at the age of 74.
October 20:
Ronnie Van Zant, Steve Gaines and Cassie Gaines (all of Lynyrd Skynyrd) died in a plane crash in 1977.

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