January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
Timeline


This siteThe web
Search
E-mail
 
The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
November 4 - 10
Last Week   Next Week

 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s In 1958, Hound Dog by Elvis Presley joined the likes of Bing Crosby’s White Christmas and Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer by Gene Autry for sales of over three million copies. Hound Dog and its double A-side partner, Don’t Be Cruel, are currently at the four million level.
 1950s The Melody Maker began its albums chart in the U.K. this week in 1958. The first number 1 album was South Pacific. It stayed there through all of 1959 and continued until March of 1960, when Freddy Cannon took over the top spot for a week. Thereafter, South Pacific crawled up and down the top 10, and when the summer ended that year, so did the soundtrack’s perch at number 1.
 1950s Sam Cooke and Lou Rawls were injured in a car accident in 1958. Rawls was a member of Cooke’s back-up band, The Pilgrim Travelers Quartet, when their car went off a road in Arkansas. The driver was killed, but the musicians weren’t seriously hurt. It would be a few years before Rawls would begin a solo career, but Cooke had already had several hits, and was just releasing his second album that year, Encore.
 1960s Brian Epstein saw The Beatles perform for the first time. It was at a lunch hour show in 1961 at the Cavern Club in Liverpool. Epstein arrived in his pin-striped suit and was announced by house DJ, Bob Wooler, as “someone rather famous,” even though Epstein was just a local retailer, selling records to most of the local kids. After getting a request for My Bonnie, and reading the hype in the Mersey Beat paper, Epstein thought he should investigate the popular group himself. He would make several more visits before offering to manage them.
 1960s John Lennon made his famous request to British royalty in 1963 when he introduced Twist and Shout. “For our last number I’d like to ask your help. Would the people in the cheaper seats, clap your hands? And the rest of you, if you just rattle your jewellery.” The Queen Mother and Princess Margaret were in attendance, but Queen Elizabeth herself wasn’t at the Royal Variety Show at the Prince of Wales Theatre in London. Twist and Shout, along with two other songs The Beatles performed that evening, She Loves You and Till There Was You, were included on the Anthology 1 release from 1995. From Me to You was the opening number.
 1960s The Fillmore West opened in San Francisco in 1965 with performances by The Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane. Promoter Bill Graham continued to feature many of the area’s up-and-coming bands, groups like Quicksilver Messenger Service and Big Brother and The Holding Company. Graham expanded his idea with The Fillmore East in New York, but would close both venues down in 1971.
 1960s John Lennon met Yoko Ono this week in 1966 at a showing of her work. The exhibition was titled, Unfinished Paintings and Objects, and was held at the Indica Art Gallery in London. The sparks didn’t fly for another two years. On the same date, Paul McCartney apparently died in a car accident, as he “blew his mind out in a car.” But it wasn’t until 1969 that the rumours of McCartney’s death began to circulate. Their classic, A Day in the Life track from the Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album was supposed to describe the car accident that killed McCartney. “He blew his mind out in a car, he didn’t notice that the lights had changed.”
 1960s The first issue of Rolling Stone Magazine was published in 1967. It featured a photo of John Lennon on the cover, dressed in army fatigues while acting in his recent film, How I Won the War. The name of the “sort of a magazine and sort of a newspaper” was compiled from three significant sources: the Muddy Waters song, the band of bad boys from the U.K. and the first rock ‘n’ roll record by Bob Dylan.
 1970s The Moody Blues re-issued the single, Nights in White Satin in 1972, five years after its original release. It went on to become their biggest hit, making it to number 2 on the U.S. singles chart. The highest it got to in the U.K. was number 9, leaving Go Now (with Denny Laine), as their only number 1 hit in their home country, followed by their next most successful British single, Question, at number 2.
 1970s The New York premiere of The Band’s, The Last Waltz film took place this week in 1977. Martin Scorsese’s direction contributed to its success, as critics felt it was one of the best concert films ever made.
 1970s Greg Reeves sued Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young for $1 million in 1978, claiming the group owed him money for his work on bass guitar for the 1970 Déjà Vu album. Dallas Taylor played drums on the album, as well as on the first CSN release and many subsequent tours.
 1970s John Travolta had the top two songs on the U.K. singles charts this week in 1978. Sandy was number 2 while Summer Nights, with Olivia Newton-John, was at the very top. Travolta also had more sales than any other artist that year.
 1970s The Eagles had their last number 1 hit in 1979 with the dismal, Heartache Tonight. It was co-written by Bob Seger. The intro to the song was “borrowed” from the lead-in to Never Let Her Slip Away, by Andrew Gold (from the All This and Heaven Too album). Several members of The Eagles had stopped into the studio where Gold was recording. As Gold later said, “Lucky we’re friends. Grrr.”
 1980s Supertramp had a live version of Dreamer climb to number 15 in the U.S. in 1980. It was taken from their double live Paris album that was sitting at number 8 on the albums chart. Only The Logical Song and Take the Long Way Home, both from the Breakfast in America album, ever made the American top 10. Dreamer (live) later showed up as a B-side track on the 1990 CD single of School, issued to promote a new Supertramp compilation.
 1980s Joe Cocker had his only number 1 hit in the U.S. in 1982 with a little help from a friend. Jennifer Warnes duetted with Cocker on the love theme from An Officer and a Gentleman, Up Where We Belong. The song stuck at the top for 3 weeks, and was joined on the soundtrack by songs from ZZ Top, Van Morrison, Dire Straits and others.
 1980s Ten years after their debut, Boston had their biggest hit with Amanda, in 1986. It was number 1 in the U.S. for the first of 2 weeks and was from their Third Stage release, an album that took six years to finish. A best-of collection was finally put together in 1997. Unfortunately, Greatest Hits was missing the key track, What’s Your Name, from the Walk On album.
 1980s In 1988, John Fogerty was found not guilty of plagiarizing one of his own songs. He had recently released The Old Man Down the Road, which his former label for all CCR releases, Fantasy Records, claimed was a copy of Run Through the Jungle from 1970. Fogerty had to play live in the courtroom and eventually pay $400000 in legal fees.
 1980s The Beach Boys returned to number 1 in the U.S. in 1988 with Kokomo. Their last top hit at home had been Good Vibrations in 1966. Between these two songs, only Rock and Roll Music from 1976 made it into the top 10. Kokomo was from the Cocktail soundtrack, and followed the album’s first single, Don’t Worry Be Happy, to the top of the charts. A third song off the soundtrack, The Hippy Hippy Shake, would do well for The Georgia Satellites.
 1980s This week in 1989, Elton John became the third artist in history to have 50 hits make the U.K. charts. Sacrifice was the song that did the trick when it entered the charts, but it all began with Your Song in 1971. Sacrifice was also Elton’s first solo number 1 in the U.K. The first two artists with 50 hits were Cliff Richard and Elvis Presley.
 1990s Neil Young had his first album in 22 years miss the top 100 of the U.S. albums chart when Weld stalled at number 154 in 1991. It contained a third CD, Arc, that was filled with feedback. The other two discs are definitely worth picking up, for songs like Blowin’ in the Wind, Cinnamon Girl, Cortez the Killer, Rockin’ in the Free World, Crime in the City, Like a Hurricane and Hey Hey, My My.
 1990s Meat Loaf hit number 1 in the U.S. in 1993 with I’d Do Anything for Love (But I Won’t Do That). Does anybody know what he’s talking about in the song? The follow-up to Bat Out of Hell was first suggested in 1984. Recording was done over a number of years, but ground to a halt in 1991 until Meat Loaf changed managers. The hit single was created after almost seven minutes was cut out of the album version of the song.
 1990s Jimmy Page and Robert Plant were guests on Soundbite, a program on BBC Radio 1 FM, in 1994. They were promoting the soon-to-be-released, No Quarter – Unledded album, which would debut at number 4 in the U.S. and at number 7 in the U.K. It included reworked versions of a number of Led Zeppelin tracks, like Thank You, Friends, Since I’ve Been Loving You, The Battle of Evermore and Kashmir.
 1990s Made in Heaven became the final studio album by Queen when it was released in 1995, almost four years after Freddie Mercury’s death. It is a very strong album, and includes Mercury’s last vocal performance, on the song, Mother Love.
 1990s Stevie Nicks released her third recording of Crystal in 1998. The new version of the song was included on the Practical Magic soundtrack. Nicks first recorded the song with Lindsey Buckingham on their Buckingham / Nicks album in 1973. It was redone in 1975 with Christine McVie taking a turn on lead vocals when it appeared on the Fleetwood Mac LP. A second contribution from Nicks, If You Ever Did Believe, was the opening song on the soundtrack, and was produced by Sheryl Crow.
 2000s Warner Brothers music group released the first DVD audio discs in 2000. The discs are DVDs but only have music on them. The sound is stored in a much higher quality format than on CDs. Early releases will be compatible with current DVD players, but to appreciate the full capabilities of the new format, a special player is required. Brain Salad Surgery from Emerson, Lake and Palmer is one of the first available titles.
 2000s Bobby Hatfield of The Righteous Brothers died in his hotel room in 2003. He and musical partner, Bill Medley, were scheduled to perform in Kalamazoo, Michigan, when Hatfield was found. The duo had been inducted into The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame earlier the same year. Hatfield had released only one solo album, Messin’ in Muscle Shoals in 1971.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

November 4:
Delbert McClinton was born the Real Thing in 1940.
November 5:
In 1931, Ike Turner was born a Poor Fool. Also born into this Wonderful World on this date were Art Garfunkel (1941), Peter Noone (Herman’s Hermits, 1947) and Bryan Adams (1959).
November 6:
Ray Conniff (1916), Bill Henderson (Chilliwack, 1944) and Glenn Frey (The Eagles, 1948) were the products of True Love.
November 7:
Raindrops were falling when Mary Travers (Peter, Paul & Mary, 1937) and Dee Clark (1938) checked in. Johnny Rivers (1942), Joni Mitchell (1943) and Nick Gilder (1951) felt a Mountain of Love on the same day.
November 8:
Just in the Nick of Time, the world witnessed the arrival of Roy Wood (The Move / ELO, 1946), Minnie Riperton (1947), Bonnie Raitt (1949) and Rickie Lee Jones (1954).
November 9:
Tom Fogerty (CCR) created quite a Commotion in 1941, when he was born.
November 10:
Dave Loggins (1947) and Greg Lake (Emerson, Lake & Palmer, 1948) were trouble Right From the Beginning when they dropped in.
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

November 5:
Guy Lombardo passed away at the age of 75, in 1977. Barry Sadler died in 1989 of heart failure. Bobby Hatfield of The Righteous Brothers died of cocaine intoxication in 2003. Link Wray died in 2005 at the age of 76.
November 6:
Dickie Goodman died in 1989 of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.
November 8:
Ivory Joe Hunter died in 1974 of lung cancer.

Last Week   Next Week
 
July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
7 - 13    14 - 20    21 - 27
28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 31

 
Timeline

Shop at
Alex's CD World
Alex’s CD World
January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
Timeline
July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
7 - 13    14 - 20    21 - 27
28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 31

 
Timeline