January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
Timeline


This siteThe web
Search
E-mail
 
The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
November 11 - 17
Last Week   Next Week

 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s New Musical Express in the U.K. published its first chart of pop singles, in 1952. The top six positions were held by Americans, with Al Martino and his Here in My Heart single holding number 1. The other five spots were taken by Jo Stafford, Nat King Cole, Bing Crosby, Guy Mitchell and Rosemary Clooney.
 1950s Shake, Rattle and Roll became Bill Haley’s first top 10 hit when it made it to number 7 in 1954. He had dropped his cowboy image about a year and a half earlier, while renaming The Saddlemen to the fiery, Bill Haley and His Comets. The song became the theme song for the Springfield Indians of the American Hockey League, and got lots of play every time the team scored. Shake, Rattle and Roll was originally made popular by Big Joe Turner.
 1950s Buddy Holly made his final recordings for Decca Records in 1956 at Bradley’s Barn, in Nashville. Holly was in town to appear at the Disk Jockey Festival. He would move on to make recordings with Norman Petty, in Clovis, New Mexico.
 1950s Fats Domino had the best seat in the house to see the arrest of five audience members during a 1957 performance. He was playing as part of the Biggest Show of Stars tour in Boston, Massachusetts, when problems began. Domino was promoting his latest single, The Big Beat, and its B-side, I Want You to Know. The Big Beat was recorded as the title track to the movie of the same name, in which Domino appeared, singing I’m Walkin’.
 1950s Johnny Mathis hit the top of the U.S. albums chart for the second time. It happened in 1959 with his Heavenly album, at a time when rock and roll was dead. Elvis Presley was in the army and other rockers, including Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis, were fading fast.
 1960s Ray Charles had his first U.S. number 1 hit when Georgia On My Mind made it in 1960. “The Genius” had hit the top 10 a year earlier with What’d I Say, and would return to the very top in each of the next two years, with Hit the Road Jack and his biggest song, I Can’t Stop Loving You.
 1960s In 1962, Big Girls Don’t Cry by The Four Seasons was at number 1 on the U.S. singles chart for the first of five weeks. It was their second single in a row to take over the top for 5 weeks, and after a Christmas single, their next hit also made it to the peak position, when Walk Like a Man stayed there for 3 weeks. Rag Doll from 1964 would be their only other number 1 song in the 1960s, and after that, they would have to wait until 1976 to do it one more time.
 1960s The Rolling Stones had their official biography, Our Own Story, published in 1964. They were on a U.S. tour at the time, which was far from trouble-free. Comments like, “such groups do not add to the community’s culture or entertainment,” as well as Brian Jones’ poor health didn’t help. They returned to the U.K. within a week.
 1960s Johnny Rivers was at number 1 in the U.S. for his only week, in 1966. Poor Side of Town was his fifth top 10 single, following Memphis, Mountain of Love, Seventh Son and Secret Agent Man. He would have a bunch more through the 1960s and ’70s, including Baby I Need Your Lovin’, The Tracks of My Tears, Rockin’ Pneumonia and the Boogie Woogie Flu and Swaying’ to the Music in 1977. Alan Freed suggested to Rivers that he change his name from Ramistella, way back in 1958. Rivers also had success with Maybellene, Summer Rain, Help Me Rhonda and a great version of A Whiter Shade of Pale.
 1960s Electric Ladyland hit number 1 on the U.S. albums chart for the first of two weeks in 1968. The double album includes such classic Jimi Hendrix tracks as Crosstown Traffic, Voodoo Chile and All Along the Watchtower and features guest appearances by Dave Mason, Steve Winwood and Al Kooper.
 1970s Bob Dylan published his first book in 1970, Tarantula. It was a controversial collection of “urban poetry” much in the same vane as lyrics on albums like Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde. The book was reprinted in the early 1990s.
 1970s Elton John recorded a live album in 1970 in New York. It was released in 1971 and featured Bad Side of the Moon, Take Me to the Pilot, Can I Put You On, Sixty Years On, Burn Down the Mission, Amoreena and a cover of The Rolling Stones’, Honky Tonk Women. Regarding the words to Take Me to the Pilot, Bernie Taupin said, “If anyone can tell me what the song is about – that would be great!”
 1970s The Doors played their last concert this week in 1970, with Jim Morrison as lead singer. The gig was held in New Orleans, Los Angeles, just days after Morrison recorded his An American Prayer poetry on his 27th birthday. It is reported that Morrison now shares an apartment with Elvis.
 1970s In 1972, Berry Oakley, bass player for The Allman Brothers Band, was killed when his motorcycle hit a bus on Remembrance Day, a year and thirteen days after Duane Allman’s accident. Oakley died three blocks away from the site that claimed Allman. Both Eric Clapton and Duane Allman play guitar on the original version of Layla, recorded by Derek and The Dominos. It was a bigger hit in 1972, reaching 2 spots higher than the limp, Unplugged version. A remixed version of the original Layla was released on Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs in 1990. It was the 20th Anniversary Edition of the original album.
 1970s In 1974 John Lennon had the number 1 song on the U.S. singles chart for the only time during his lifetime, with Whatever Gets You Through the Night. Elton John played on the track and during recording was sure it would be a big hit. Lennon told him that if it went to number 1 that he’d join Elton on stage during one of his concerts. They played three songs together: I Saw Her Standing There, Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds and Whatever Gets You Through the Night. Backstage after the concert, Lennon got back with Yoko Ono after a temporary split.
 1970s Rush was three times lucky in 1977 when their last three albums all went gold. 2112, All the World’s a Stage and the current LP, A Farewell to Kings, all hit the plateau as the band from Canada was becoming international favourites. All three albums would eventually go platinum.
 1980s Bruce Dickinson became the new frontman for Iron Maiden in 1981 when he made his first live appearance with the heavy metal group. Dickinson replaced Paul Di’Anno who moved on to work with such bands as Lone Wolf, Battlezone and Killers (named after his last album with Iron Maiden). Die-hard fans were relieved when The Number of the Beast, the first Maiden album with Dickinson, turned out to be one of the group’s finest. In fact, it has been described as one of the best heavy metal albums ever released.
 1980s In 1984, The Police received certification in the U.S. that Ghost in the Machine had sold two million copies while Synchronicity went over the four million mark. The latter held the number 1 position on the U.S. albums charts for an amazing 17 weeks.
 1980s Dire Straits became the first artist to sell over three million copies of an album in the U.K. when Brothers in Arms passed the mark in 1987. It contained five, top 40 singles: Money for Nothing, So Far Away, Walk of Life, Brothers in Arms and Your Latest Trick.
 1980s Around this time in 1988, The Scorpions played ten concerts in Leningrad, USSR, followed by an appearance at the Moscow Music Peace Festival. Lead singer, Klaus Meine, was so moved by the reaction of the huge crowds that he wrote Wind of Change in response. The song became a smash hit when released on the digitally recorded Crazy World album a couple years later. The lyrics to Wind of Change were presented on a plaque to an impressed Mikhail Gorbachev when he invited The Scorpions back to the Soviet Union in 1991.
 1990s Rod Stewart was sued in 1990 by one of his fans when she claimed that a soccer ball he kicked into the crowd at a June concert ruptured the tendon in her middle finger. She later received a $17000 settlement. Stewart had recently released Downtown Train, an album of selected tracks from his Storyteller box set.
 1990s Elton John performed on the Late Show With David Letterman in 1995. His Made in England album had been released earlier in the year, and contained the singles, Believe, Blessed and the title track. He was promoting his current compilation, Love Songs, which eventually made it to number 7 in the U.K.
 1990s Ray Charles was chatting on the Internet in 1997. The singer was hosted by Rhino Records to help promote the five CD box set, Genius and Soul: The 50th Anniversary Collection. Fans connected with The Genius to ask questions about the ultimate career-spanning compilation.
 2000s The Beatles finally launched their own Internet domain, www.thebeatles.com, in 2000. The site helped promote their new greatest hits package, 1. Twenty-seven number 1 hits were included on the CD, destined to become a huge seller all over the world. Fans immediately started asking about a companion album to collect the rest of their hits.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

November 11:
LaVern Baker (1929), Chris Dreja (The Yardbirds, 1945) and Marshall Crenshaw (1953) were delivered Over Under Sideways Down.
November 12:
Brian Hyland (1943), Booker T. Jones (1944) and Neil Young (1945) were born Sealed With a Kiss.
November 13:
It would be awhile before Baby Washington (1940) and Timmy Thomas (1944) would find out That’s How Heartaches are Made.
November 14:
James Young (Styx, 1949) became the pride and joy of some Lady in Chicago. Everybody Needs Love, and so did Stephen Bishop (1951) when he was born.
November 15:
Petula Clark was born in a Downtown hospital in 1932 and Clyde McPhatter became his parents’ little Treasure of Love in 1942.
November 16:
Chi Coltrane began the Road to Tomorrow in 1948.
November 17:
Gordon Lightfoot arrived at Sundown in 1938 and the stork was Eight Miles High when delivering Gene Clark (The Byrds) in 1941.
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

November 11:
Berry Oakley died in a motorcycle accident in 1972. Ronnie Dyson died of heart failure in 1990.
November 13:
Nineteen year old Jerry Lee Lewis Jr. died in a car accident in 1973. Bill Doggett passed away at the age of 80, in 1996.
November 17:
Arthur Conley died at the age of 57 in 2003 of intestinal cancer.

Last Week   Next Week
 
July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
7 - 13    14 - 20    21 - 27
28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 31

 
Timeline

Shop at
Alex's CD World
Alex’s CD World
January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
Timeline
July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
7 - 13    14 - 20    21 - 27
28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 31

 
Timeline