January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
Timeline


This siteThe web
Search
E-mail
 
The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
November 18 - 24
Last Week   Next Week

 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s Sammy Davis Jr. was involved in a car accident in 1954. He lost his left eye, causing him to sport a patch soon after. Davis had released a number of singles for Brunswick records that year, but when he switched over to Decca for several 1955 releases, his fortune changed. Something’s Gotta Give, Love Me or Leave Me and That Old Black Magic were all hits by the time summer came.
 1960s Maurice Williams took his song and The Zodiacs to number 1 in the U.S. this week in 1960, when Stay took over from Ray Charles. The track was written back in 1953, long before The Zodiacs took their name. Williams wrote Stay and Little Darlin’ around the same time, and recorded the latter song as The Gladiolas. The Diamonds did one take of their own version of Little Darlin’ and had a huge hit with it. Finally, Maurice Williams and The Zodiacs got their due when Stay put them at the top of the charts. The song has since been covered by people like The Four Seasons, Andrew Gold and Jackson Browne.
 1960s The assassination of John F. Kennedy put a damper on sales of Phil Spector’s Christmas album in 1963. A Christmas Gift for You was recorded several months earlier and contained many of the artists whom Spector produced. The Ronettes, The Crystals, Darlene Love and Bob B. Soxx and The Blue Jeans all contributed tracks. The album was included as the fourth disc in Spector’s box set, Back to Mono 1958-1969.
 1960s Arlo Guthrie released his landmark debut album in 1967, Alice’s Restaurant. Side one of the LP was a single 18 minute folk song telling the tale of Alice’s Restaurant Massacree, a collection of anti-establishment anecdotes. Although the album peaked at only number 17 in early 1968, it went on to sell over a million copies.
 1970s Isaac Hayes hit number 1 this week in 1971 with the Theme From Shaft, a mostly instrumental track used in the Shaft movie, starring Richard Roundtree. The song was Hayes’ only million-selling single, although he did have seven other songs place in the U.S. top 40, and only one of those cracked the top 20.
 1970s Danny Whitten, of Crazy Horse (Neil Young’s backup band), died of a heroin overdose on November 18th, 1972. Young’s, The Needle and the Damage Done and Tonight’s the Night, are a couple of his songs commenting on the loss of Whitten, friend Bruce Berry and others of the same fate.
 1970s Poco appeared on the very first Don Kirshner In Concert television special shown in the U.S. in 1972. They were just releasing their fifth album at the time, A Good Feelin’ to Know, which featured great songs like Sweet Lovin’ and the title track.
 1970s At a 1973 Who concert, a 19 year old fan sat in on drums to replace an exhausted Keith Moon, after he could no longer continue. It must have been contagious as the young drummer later said that he too was exhausted, but after only three songs. Moon said he was suffering from jet lag, as the band was touring to promote Quadrophenia.
 1970s Ringo Starr had the number 1 song this week in 1973. Photograph, from the Ringo album, was his third of seven consecutive, top 10 singles in the U.S. (even McCartney couldn’t beat this), and Starr’s first to hit the top. He would return two months later with You’re Sixteen. Starr was busy in 1998, releasing two albums, Vertical Man and VH1 Storytellers. Storytellers is his most entertaining album. Between tracks, Starr gives the stories behind songs like, With a Little Help From My Friends, It Don’t Come Easy, Don’t Pass Me By, Back Off Boogaloo, Octopus’ Garden, Photograph and Love Me Do. He also treats us to an impression of the late Peter Sellers.
 1970s Spooky Tooth called it quits in 1974, after releasing seven albums since 1968. They had several shifts in personnel, and saw the likes of Gary Wright, Mick Jones (later with Foreigner), Chris Stainton (who went on to work with Joe Cocker), Henry McCullough (recruited by Paul McCartney and Wings) and vocalist Mike Harrison. They were an all-British band but never charted at home, experiencing their greatest success in the U.S.
 1970s Jerry Lee Lewis was arrested twice in two days in 1976. He was arrested on a drunk driving charge and then the next day, drove to Graceland demanding to see Elvis Presley, while waving a pistol at the Memphis mansion. Two months previously, Lewis literally almost became “The Killer” when he shot holes through his office door, hitting Norman Owens, his bass player, in the chest. Owens recovered and later sued.
 1970s Chuck Berry was released from prison in 1979 after serving time for tax evasion at the Lompoc Prison Farm in California. He was in for four months, while his last studio album of new material, Rockit, was issued by Atco Records.
 1980s Tina Turner’s cover of Al Green’s, Let’s Stay Together, entered the U.K. charts this week in 1983. She attained superstar status in the following years, and recorded songs with Eric Clapton, David Bowie, Rod Stewart and Bryan Adams.
 1980s Tom Evans of Badfinger committed suicide on November 23rd, 1983, not long after a heated telephone argument with bandmate, Joey Molland. Fellow group member, Pete Ham, also hanged himself, back in 1975. Their last album had been Say No More, from 1981. Next to Roy Orbison, Badfinger was the unluckiest act in the business.
 1980s Big Joe Turner died in 1985. He was one of the first artists to play rock and roll when he had a hit with Shake, Rattle and Roll in 1954. The song was soon covered by Bill Haley and His Comets. Likewise, Turner preceded B.B. King with Sweet Sixteen, and wrote Honey Hush, a hit song also recorded by Jerry Lee Lewis and Paul McCartney.
 1980s In 1987 this week, Billy Idol had his biggest single with a live version of Tommy James and The Shondells’, Mony Mony. Strangely enough, the hit (and controversial), live version is difficult to find on a Billy Idol CD, and the B-side to the 45 rpm single was an excellent live version of Shakin’ All Over.
 1980s Chris Rea had the number 1 album in 1989 on the New Musical Express albums chart in the U.K. The Road to Hell was Rea’s first number 1 album, and included the lengthy title track, as well as such standouts as That’s What They Always Say, Tell Me There’s a Heaven and a re-recording of Texas, one of his songs from 1983. A sequel, The Road to Hell Part 2, was released in 1999, but didn’t come close to matching the quality of the original.
 1980s Diane Warren was the songwriter of the number 1 and number 2 songs in the U.S. this week in 1989. When I See You Smile by Bad English was at the top, followed by Blame It On the Rain, by Milli Vanilli. She has written many more since then, including I Don’t Want to Miss a Thing for Aerosmith and the Armageddon soundtrack in 1998.
 1990s The Righteous Brothers’ popularity was on the upswing in 1990, following the success of the movie, Ghost, which featured their 1965 hit, Unchained Melody. The original and a re-recorded version both made it into the top 20, while three Greatest Hits packages (from different record labels), were on the U.S. albums chart.
 1990s Freddie Mercury of Queen died of AIDS on November 24th, 1991. Both Queen albums released after his death (Innuendo and Made in Heaven) are excellent. A box set of the first eight Queen albums, The Crown Jewels: A 25th Anniversary Celebration, was recently released. Eric Carr, drummer for Kiss, died the same day as Freddie Mercury, of complications from cancer. Carr had been with the band since 1980 when he replaced Peter Criss.
 1990s In 1992, Billy Joel appeared at the Commitment to Live VI, a Los Angeles AIDS fund-raiser honouring Barbra Streisand and David Geffen. It was held at the Universal Amphitheatre in California, and Joel most likely performed songs like All Shook Up and Heartbreak Hotel that he had just recorded for the Honeymoon in Vegas soundtrack.
 1990s David Crosby spent seven hours on the operating table in 1994, finally being treated to a liver transplant. He was at UCLA’s Medical Center getting the work done after three weeks on a waiting list, and cancelling the Crosby, Stills & Nash 25th Anniversary Tour. The group was also supporting their latest Atlantic Records release, After the Storm.
 1990s Michael Hutchence, lead singer of Australian supergroup, INXS, hanged himself in 1997. He was in Sydney at the time, ready to begin rehearsals for the band’s 20th anniversary tour. Earlier in the year, the underrated INXS album, Elegantly Wasted, had been released, but received very little attention. The Hutchence self-titled solo album was finally issued in 1999. Work on it began in 1995, and was completed after the tragedy when U2’s, Bono, added some vocals.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

November 18:
Hank Ballard (1927) and John Parr (1954) first did The Hoochi Coochi Coo.
November 19:
Tommy Dorsey was still a bit young to do the Tea for Two Cha Cha when he arrived in 1905.
November 20:
Norman Greenbaum (1942), Duane Allman (1946) and Joe Walsh (1947) each began A Life of Illusion.
November 21:
Dr. John (1940) and Livingston Taylor (1950) were born at the Right Place Wrong Time.
November 22:
Hoagy Carmichael was born with a little Star Dust in 1899.
November 23:
Betty Everett (1939), Keith Hampshire (1945) and Bruce Hornsby (1954) were born in the Mandolin Rain.
November 24:
Pete Best (1941) arrived after much Crying, Waiting, Hoping. Donald “Duck” Dunn (Booker T. & The MGs, 1941) came out of Soul-Limbo.
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

November 18:
Danny Whitten (Crazy Horse) died of a drug overdose in 1972.
November 21:
Allan Sherman died of respiratory problems at the age of 49, in 1973.
November 22:
Michael Hutchence (INXS) hanged himself in 1997.
November 23:
Tom Evans (Badfinger) hanged himself in 1983. Big Joe Turner passed away at the age of 74 in 1985. Tommy Boyce was 55 when he committed suicide in 1994. O.C. Smith died in 2001 of a heart attack.
November 24:
Eric Carr (Kiss) died in 1991 of cancer. Freddie Mercury (Queen) died of AIDS in 1991.

Last Week   Next Week
 
July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
7 - 13    14 - 20    21 - 27
28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 31

 
Timeline

Shop at
Alex's CD World
Alex’s CD World
January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
Timeline
July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
7 - 13    14 - 20    21 - 27
28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 31

 
Timeline