January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
Timeline


This siteThe web
Search
E-mail
 
The Week in Rock 'n' Roll
November 25 - December 1
Last Week   Next Week

 E v e n t s Birthdays     Farewells 

 1950s The man in black, Johnny Cash, made his debut on the country charts in 1955 when Cry! Cry! Cry! made it to number 14 in the U.S. His next seven singles would all make the country top 10, with I Walk the Line and There You Go both hitting number 1. Ballad of a Teenage Queen was his most successful song, holding the top C&W position for 10 weeks in 1958. Maybe Sun Records didn’t need Elvis Presley after all.
 1950s Buddy Holly, Sam Cooke and The Rays all made their first appearance on the same Ed Sullivan Show in 1957. Cooke belted out You Send Me, The Rays sang their one and only big hit, Silhouettes, and Holly and The Crickets performed two of their most popular tracks, That’ll Be the Day and Peggy Sue. You Send Me would hit number 1 in the U.S. the very next day, and stick for three weeks. Cooke went on to define soul, and earn the nickname, The Man Who Invented Soul.
 1950s Phil Spector had his song, To Know Him is to Love Him, begin three weeks at number 1 in the U.S. in 1958. The title of the song came from words on his father’s tombstone. Spector formed The Teddy Bears and recorded the hit in two takes with studio time left over after putting Don’t You Worry My Little Pet to tape. Another member of the vocal group, Carol Connors, went on to have a hand in writing other hits, including Hey Little Cobra, The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia, With You I’m Born Again and Gonna Fly Now, the theme from Rocky. Spector made his home in the studio and developed the famous “wall of sound,” which was used with artists like The Righteous Brothers and The Ronettes. Many of his early hit productions can be heard on the Back to Mono box set.
 1950s The Kingston Trio was the first group to have a number 1 album on the U.S. albums chart. Their self-titled release did the trick in 1958. Previously, only solo artists held the top spot. They would record successful albums over the next six years, with a total of fourteen of them making the top 10, and an additional five in the U.S. top 25.
 1950s The Crests released their forever popular doo wop hit, 16 Candles, in 1958. After switching record companies earlier that year, a new ballad was recorded. Beside You would become the next single, and for the B-side, a song called 21 Candles was planned. It was recorded as 16 Candles and got shipped out to radio stations to support the Beside You A-side. However, many disc jockeys preferred 16 Candles and soon turned it into a number 2 hit.
 1960s Bobby Darin married movie starlet, Sandra Dee, in 1960. He was currently enjoying a string of hits, including Beyond the Sea, Clementine, Won’t You Come Home Bill Bailey and Artificial Flowers, all in 1960. A year earlier Darin spent nine weeks at number 1 in the U.S. with Mack the Knife. The couple would divorce in early 1967.
 1960s The Everly Brothers joined the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves at Camp Pendleton, San Diego, in 1961. They became part of the 8th Battalion, as artillerymen. A bulk of material had been recorded for Warner Brothers Records before the duo were cut off from the outside world, and from that stockpile, Crying in the Rain was issued as a single. Don and Phil left the marines six months later.
 1960s Willie Nelson played the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville for the first time. It happened in 1964, three years after Patsy Cline had a huge hit with his song, Crazy. Nelson opened for Roger Miller, who was very hot with Chug-a-Lug, followed soon by King of the Road. Willie would sign with RCA Records the next month and record a very successful album with Country Willie: His Own Songs.
 1960s Jimmie Rodgers suffered a fractured skull and a broken wrist in a mishap on the San Diego Freeway in 1967. He was allegedly beaten by three police officers and required brain surgery. Rodgers now has a huge steel plate in his head. Ten years had gone by since the success of the number 1 smash, Honeycomb. Rodgers added to his list of hits with Kisses Sweeter Than Wine, Oh-Oh I’m Falling in Love Again, Secretly and Are You Really Mine, all top 10 songs in the 1950s. Not much success came with the ’60s, but Rodgers was mounting a bit of a comeback with his new single, Child of Clay, when the incident occurred. He would recover and return to performing a little over a year later.
 1960s Cream played their final two concerts in 1968 at the Royal Albert Hall in London. Over 10000 fans attended while thousands more were turned away. British groups, Yes and Taste were supporting acts. It seems odd to fans that Eric Clapton doesn’t think very highly of the music created by his band with Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker.
 1960s Steppenwolf’s first album went gold just as their new single was peaking inside the top 10 in 1968. Magic Carpet Ride was the group’s second big hit, following Born to Be Wild up the charts. A number of minor hits continued into the early ’70s, with only Rock Me making the top 10. Born to Be Wild gained immortality after it was used in the 1969 film, Easy Rider. The song has since been on countless other soundtracks.
 1960s John Lennon returned his MBE award to Buckingham Palace in 1969. The Beatles had been given them in 1965 for their part in boosting the British economy. Lennon sent his award back with a note that read, “Your Majesty, I am returning this MBE in protest against Britain’s involvement in the Nigeria-Biafra thing, against our support of America in Vietnam, and against Cold Turkey slipping down the charts. With love, John Lennon of Bag.”
 1960s Simon and Garfunkel found themselves on American television in 1969, hosting their own TV special. Only The Boxer single had been released as new music that year, with Garfunkel being busy starting an acting career. Extensive sessions for the Bridge Over Troubled Water LP were almost wrapped up as well, aiming at a February 1970 release. One sponsor of their show backed out after learning about some of the political content being aired.
 1970s George Harrison released his triple album, All Things Must Pass, in 1970. A number of the songs were left over from Beatle sessions, while others were just filler on the very bloated album. Phil Spector helped produce a very muddy sounding album that ended up sitting at number 1 for 7 weeks in the U.S. The following year, legal action was begun against Harrison because of the My Sweet Lord track, which was thought to be lifted from He’s So Fine.
 1970s Elton John had his fifth consecutive number 1 album in the U.S. when his Greatest Hits collection spent the first of 10 weeks at the top in 1974. The previous hit albums were Honky Chateau, Don’t Shoot Me I’m Only the Piano Player, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road and Caribou.
 1970s John Lennon made good on a bet he had with Elton John in 1974. Elton was in the studio helping Lennon record Whatever Gets You Through the Night, and bet that it would become a number 1 hit. Lennon accepted his wager that if it did hit the top, he would appear with Elton on stage. The song topped the Billboard charts on November 16th, and so the two giants of rock ‘n’ roll performed at Madison Square Gardens on Thanksgiving day. Whatever Gets You Through the Night, Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds and Paul McCartney’s, I Saw Her Standing There were the three songs they played together. The latter was introduced as “a number by an estranged fiancé.”
 1970s Bohemian Rhapsody hit the top spot in the U.K. this week in 1975, where it stayed until the end of January 1976. It was the biggest hit since 1955, when Slim Whitman’s, Rose Marie, had a stranglehold on the number 1 position. And in 1999, Queen’s mega-hit (twice!) was voted the best song in the Music of the Millennium poll, organized in Britain by Channel 4, HMV and Classic FM.
 1970s Kevin Godley and Lol Creme left 10cc in 1976. At the time, the group was coming off the smash hit, I’m Not in Love. Nine years later Godley and Creme made the top 20 with Cry, a song that was covered in the 1990s by The Philosopher Kings. Godley and Creme have also been very busy directing music videos, including one for U2’s, The Sweetest Thing. The remaining duo of Graham Gouldman and Eric Stewart continued with the 10cc name and did very well with their follow-up album, Deceptive Bends.
 1970s The Band’s final hurrah, The Last Waltz, took place in 1976, on November 25th. It included appearances by Bob Dylan (playing Forever Young), Van Morrison (Caravan), Eric Clapton (Further On Up the Road), Joni Mitchell (Coyote), Neil Young (Helpless), Ringo Starr (drums), Emmylou Harris (vocals, guitar), Muddy Waters (Mannish Boy), Ronnie Hawkins (Who Do You Love) and Neil Diamond (Dry Your Eyes).
 1970s Supertramp recorded its concerts at Le Pavillon in Paris for the live album, Paris in 1979. Take the Long Way Home, from Breakfast in America, was climbing the charts at the time and made it to number 10 several weeks later. Paris was released in 1980 as a double album and contained the number 15 hit, Dreamer, a live version of the song that was originally on the Crime of the Century album. Roger Hodgson eventually left the band a couple years later, and in 1997 he released his own live album that included his versions of Take the Long Way Home, The Logical Song and Give a Little Bit.
 1980s Just as compact discs were being demonstrated as the new music format in 1981, the British Phonographic Industry released a statement commenting on how, “home taping is wiping out music.” Artists like Elton John, Gary Numan, Cliff Richard and 10cc agreed there should be a tax added onto the price of blank cassette tapes. Of course the same issue would be raised years later when CD copying was possible by consumers.
 1980s In 1981, Foreigner’s, Waiting for a Girl Like You, made it to number 2. For the next 10 weeks, it would unsuccessfully try to topple Physical and I Can’t Go for That (No Can Do) from the number 1 position. The band would have to wait until 1985 to have it’s first top hit, when I Want to Know What Love Is (which sounded like a sequel to Waiting for a Girl Like You), hit the top.
 1980s Neil Young was sued by Geffen Records in 1983 because it was claimed that his new music for the label was “not commercial in nature and musically uncharacteristic of his previous albums.” It seemed David Geffen didn’t realize that Young’s albums are intentionally recorded to be “uncharacteristic of his previous albums.”
 1980s Do They Know It’s Christmas? was recorded in London in 1984 by an all-star cast of British artists. Midge Ure and Bob Geldof wrote the song that became the biggest selling single in the U.K. at the time. The track was listed under the Band Aid name and was performed by the writers as well as Paul Young, Sting, Phil Collins, members of U2 and many others. The song raised money for famine relief in Ethiopa. Do They Know It’s Christmas? is available on a number of Christmas compilations, as well as on The Very Best of Midge Ure / Ultravox.
 1980s In 1987, REM had their first entry into the top 10, with The One I Love. Shortly after, they signed with a major record label (Warner Brothers), and went on to have a string of hits with Stand in 1989, and several more in the early 1990s, including Losing My Religion, Shiny Happy People, Drive, Man On the Moon and Everybody Hurts.
 1980s Level 42 lost brothers, Boon and Phil Gould, to poor health in 1987. The two left the group when Level 42 was at its peak, with the Running in the Family album. Children Say was on the charts and went to number 22 in the U.K.
 1990s The Eagles had their reunion album at the top of the charts in 1994 when Hell Freezes Over hit number 1 for the first of a couple of weeks. It included an excellent revision of Hotel California, as well as many of their more popular songs. Tracks like Take It Easy, Desperado, I Can’t Tell You Why and Tequila Sunrise were performed for an MTV audience, in addition to the four new songs on the album, Love Will Keep Us Alive, The Girl From Yesterday, Learn to Be Still and the new single, Get Over It.
 1990s Kenny G set a world record in 1997. He was out promoting his new Greatest Hits album when he made a stop at New York’s, J&R Music World store. The G man took a deep breath and held an E-flat note on his saxophone for 45 minutes and 47 seconds. The most amazing part of the whole event was the fact that there was someone still around to stop the clock.
 1990s The Zombies reunited very briefly in 1997 to promote their new box set, titled Zombie Heaven. Leader Rod Argent (keyboards), Paul Atkinson (guitar), Colin Blunstone (vocals), Hugh Grundy (drums) and Chris White (bass) hadn’t played together in 30 years. They performed their two biggest hits, She’s Not There and Time of the Season at London’s Jazz Café.
 
 B i r t h d a y s Events     Farewells 

November 25:
Percy Sledge (1941) and Amy Grant (1960) first experienced Warm and Tender Love.
November 26:
Tina Turner became One of the Living in 1938. There was Love in Store for John McVie of Fleetwood Mac when he was born in 1945.
November 27:
Al Jackson (Booker T. & The MGs, 1935), Jimi Hendrix (1942) and Eddie Rabbitt (1944) were all delivered Step by Step.
November 28:
Berry Gordy Jr. (the father of Motown, in 1929), Bruce Channel (1940), Randy Newman (1943) and R.B. Greaves (1944) became Short People.
November 29:
John Mayall (1933), Chuck Mangione (1940), Felix Cavaliere (The Rascals, 1944) and Barry Goudreau (Boston, 1951) became products of Good Lovin’.
November 30:
Dick “Face-Lift” Clark (1929), Roger Glover (Deep Purple, 1945) and Billy Idol (1955) landed in the Cradle of Love.
December 1:
The Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy announced the arrivals of Billy Paul (1934) and Lou Rawls (1935), Bette Midler (1945) and Gilbert O’Sullivan (1946).
   
 F a r e w e l l s Events     Birthdays 

November 26:
Tommy Dorsey choked to death a week after his 51st birthday in 1956.
November 27:
Barbara Acklin died of pneumonia in 1998.
November 29:
David “Butch” McDade of The Amazing Rhythm Aces died of cancer in 1998 at the age of 52. George Harrison lost his battle with cancer in 2001. He was 58.
November 30:
Tiny Tim died of a heart attack in 1996.
December 1:
Lee Dorsey died in 1986 from emphysema.

Last Week   Next Week
 
July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
7 - 13    14 - 20    21 - 27
28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 31

 
Timeline

Shop at
Alex's CD World
Alex’s CD World
January
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Feb 4

February
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Mar 3

March
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - 31

April
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - May 5

May
6 - 12    13 - 19    20 - 26
27 - Jun 2

June
3 - 9    10 - 16    17 - 23
24 - 30

 
Timeline
July
1 - 7    8 - 14    15 - 21
22 - 28    29 - Aug 4

August
5 - 11    12 - 18    19 - 25
26 - Sep 1

September
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 29    30 - Oct 6

October
7 - 13    14 - 20    21 - 27
28 - Nov 3

November
4 - 10    11 - 17    18 - 24
25 - Dec 1

December
2 - 8    9 - 15    16 - 22
23 - 31

 
Timeline