QUÉBEC
Coat of Arms

Armorial Bearings

Officially granted by Royal Warrant on May 26, 1868, by Queen Victoria. Revised by the Government of Québec on December 9, 1939, in order to more fully represent Qué'bec's heraldry and history.

Divided into 3 horizontal bands, the top band displays three fleurs-de-lis, a highly-recognized symbol of Québec, on a blue background. The bottom band displays three green maple leafs with gold veins, representing Canada, on a gold background. The middle band displays a blue-tongued, blue-clawed Heraldic Lion, representing the Crown.

Coat of Arms

Officially granted by Royal Warrant on May 26, 1868, by Queen Victoria. Revised by the Government of Québec on December 9, 1939, in order to more fully represent Qué'bec's heraldry and history.

Sitting atop an artistically-rectangularized Armorial Bearings is the Royal Crown representing Qué'bec's current relationship with England.

The Motto, JE ME SOUVIENS, which means 'I Remember', is printed in blue lettering beneath the Shield.

Although the motto has been official since 1939, it has been unofficially recognized since 1883 when Eugène-Étienne Taché, the designer of the Parliament Building in Quebec City, planned an engraving of the Coat of Arms of Québec (as granted by Queen Victoria) above the door of the Main Tower entrance. The plans were added to the building contract and was signed on February 9, 1883.

In the early 1960's, the Tower underwent major renovations and the original Coat of Arms engraved above the door was replaced by the new version.

It is unclear where and when the motto 'Je Me Souviens' was first quoted and there are many theories. It is, however, commonly accepted that the motto effectively represents the French influence in Canada's early history and clearly defines Québec as a distinct province in the Confederation.