YUKON
Coat of Arms

Armorial Bearings

Officially granted by Royal Warrant in February 1956 by Queen Elizabeth II.

Topping the Shield is the red Cross of St. George represents the early English explorers of the Yukon Territory. Centred on the cross is a 'roundel in vair', symbolizing the importance of fur trade in Yukon's early history. The red 'spires' in the lower portion of the shield represent the Rocky Mountains with the gold circles representing the mineral wealth of the territory. The wavy blue and white lines running vertically between the mountain spires represent the Yukon River and the many creeks and streams of the Klondike where gold can be found.

Coat of Arms

Officially granted by Royal Warrant in February 1956 by Queen Elizabeth II.

Standing on a mound of snow atop the Shield is a Malamute (Husky), representing the importance of this dog as an agent of survival in a hostile land. Physically strong and able to withstand the bitter cold of the north, the Husky not only provided (and provides) transportation with its ability to pull heavy loads on dog sleds, but it also provided vital warmth through the cold winter nights and, occasionally, food for desperate explorers and travellers.