Scientific Computing World endorses Anti TRIZ-journal !

In December 2003, "Scientific Computing World" magazine published a TRIZ review by Ray Girvan which praised the role of Anti TRIZ-journal.

In particular, the article reads: "The TRIZ market has its dissidents, notably Yevgeny Karasik, one of Altshuller's ex-students and a classical Triznik, who is highly critical of current offshoots from the original vision of a general, non-computerised, approach to innovation. He notes that 'There is still no proof that algorithmisation of problem solving - an art - is achievable. Altshuller's research technique is hard to reproduce effectively, as nobody is as good at formalising the intuitive process of extracting interesting and novel inventions from the ocean of all inventions. However, that aim is appealing; there's an objective necessity to significantly improve the innovation process in industry. TRIZ (and all its modifications) promises to fill that vacuum; that is why it finds clients.' "

It is, of course, a great honour to be called a dissident. However, I do not consider myself to be "a classical TRIZnik". Moreover, I am not against computerizing TRIZ. I am against of doing it improperly. Our company "Thought Guiding Systems" is the only one that offers a correct approach to computerizing.

I also could not recall the above quotation from me. After digging in the memory, I recalled that in October 2003 Mr. Girvan contacted me and asked for an opinion about the current state of TRIZ. My response to him was as follows:

"...If we assume the point of view that TRIZ is a new area of research aiming at algorithmization of the art of problem solving, then its current state is as follows:

Probably facing the necessity of squeezing this opinion into his not too long article Ray Girvan compressed it into a pseudo quotation: 'There is still no proof that algorithmisation of problem solving - an art - is achievable. Altshuller's research technique is hard to reproduce effectively, as nobody is as good at formalising the intuitive process of extracting interesting and novel inventions from the ocean of all inventions. However, that aim is appealing; there's an objective necessity to significantly improve the innovation process in industry. TRIZ (and all its modifications) promises to fill that vacuum; that is why it finds clients."

Nevertheless, despite the above shortcomings, Ray Girvan review is an important step forward towards the balanced assessment of TRIZ.