The complete definition of ideal machine

Y. B. Karasik
Thoughts Guiding Systems Corp.
Ottawa, Canada.
e-mail: karasik@sympatico.ca

Alsthuller defined ideal machine as a machine with zero mass and dimensions. He also used to say that ideal machine is no machine but its function is fulfilled (or its work is done). These definitions miss his own point that the work (or the function) has to be performed by itself. Still defining ideal machine as no machine which work is performed by itself is also incomplete. The key to the complete definition of ideal machine is IFR. It says that the product by itself should accomplish what machine was supposed to do with it. Thus, the complete definition of ideal machine is this:

Ideal machine is no machine but what it was supposed to work on by itself does what the machine was supposed to do to it.

For example, what is the ideal water tank ? It is no tank at all but water by itself stays inside the area which previously was the interior of a tank and does not spill beyond it.

The above definition can be further specified depending on what kind of objects machine is supposed to work on. If these objects are raw materials, which machine is supposed to convert into products then we have the following definition of ideal manufacturing machine:

The ideal manufacturing machine is no machine but the raw materials, which it was supposed to convert into products, by themselves convert themselves into the products.

If a machine is intended to convert some inputs into outputs then we have the following definition of the ideal transforming machine:

The ideal transforming machine is no machine but inputs, which it was supposed to convert into outputs, by themselves convert themselves into the outputs.

If a machine is intended to transport something then we have the following definition of the ideal transportation machine:

The ideal transportation machine is no machine but the freight it was supposed to move, by itself transports itself.

If a machine is intended to preserve something (as in the above example with a tank that preserves water from spilling) then we have the following definition of the ideal preserving machine:

The ideal preserving machine is no machine but objects, which state, position, or shape it was supposed to preserve, by themselves preserve their state, position, or shape, etc.

If machine is intended to affect/influence/agitate something then we have the following definition of ideal affecting machine:

Ideal affecting machine is no machine but what it was supposed to affect/influence by itself affects/influences itself.

As a summary, we obtain:

Ideal machine is no machine but raw materials/inputs/objects/processes that it was supposed to preserve/transposrt/affect/influence or convert into products/outputs, by themselves preserver/transposrt/affect/influence themselves or by themselves convert themselves into products/outputs.